Ocean News

Discussion in 'All Things Boats & Boating' started by ImaginaryNumber, Oct 8, 2015.

  1. myark
    Joined: Oct 2012
    Posts: 689
    Likes: 16, Points: 28, Legacy Rep: 57
    Location: Thailand

    myark Senior Member

    The science is nothing new; global warming is causing ice to melt and seas to expand, leading to increased flooding - but the realities have hit home in recent years.
    'We share the same backyard': The islands disappearing off Australia https://www.sbs.com.au/news/we-share-the-same-backyard-the-islands-disappearing-off-australia??connectsbs=1&cx_cid=sbs:bench:naca:EN:native:evergreen:2018:DisappearingIslands
    Kathy thinks the at-risk Marshall Islands could be underwater in the next half-century: “50 years… that makes sense to me, but I’m not a scientist,” she says.
    But some islands may be uninhabitable well before then.
    [​IMG]
     
  2. ImaginaryNumber
    Joined: May 2009
    Posts: 415
    Likes: 40, Points: 28, Legacy Rep: 399
    Location: USA

    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    This mind-boggling study shows just how massive sea level rise really is | Washington Post

    It may sound ridiculous to even contemplate. But in a new study just out in the open access journal Earth System Dynamics, scientists have actually published an idea and calculations for what it would take to keep the oceans from rising. The idea is to pump excess seawater more than two miles into the air to the top of the Antarctic ice sheet, where it would freeze and stay put — for a very long time, although not forever.

    360 billion tons of ocean water would need to be pumped to lower the oceans by one millimeter -- and the oceans are currently rising at a rate of 3mm per year. To pump that volume of water would require 7% of the total energy that we generate each year. Or we could install 850,000 wind turbines around Antarctica to provide the power.

    The scale of this proposal is, in the end, self-refuting — which, again, is part of the point.
     
  3. SamSam
    Joined: Feb 2005
    Posts: 3,731
    Likes: 131, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 971
    Location: Coastal Georgia

    SamSam Senior Member

  4. myark
    Joined: Oct 2012
    Posts: 689
    Likes: 16, Points: 28, Legacy Rep: 57
    Location: Thailand

    myark Senior Member

    A solution to plastic in the ocean

    [​IMG]
     
  5. ImaginaryNumber
    Joined: May 2009
    Posts: 415
    Likes: 40, Points: 28, Legacy Rep: 399
    Location: USA

    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    Climate Change Could Force Over 140 Million to Migrate Within Countries by 2050: World Bank Report

    The report, Groundswell – Preparing for Internal Climate Migration, is the first and most comprehensive study of its kind to focus on the nexus between slow-onset climate change impacts, internal migration patterns and, development in three developing regions of the world: Sub-Saharan Africa, South Asia, and Latin America.

    It finds that unless urgent climate and development action is taken globally and nationally, these three regions together could be dealing with tens of millions of internal climate migrants by 2050. These are people forced to move from increasingly non-viable areas of their countries due to growing problems like water scarcity, crop failure, sea-level rise and storm surges.

    These “climate migrants” would be additional to the millions of people already moving within their countries for economic, social, political or other reasons, the report warns.

     
  6. ImaginaryNumber
    Joined: May 2009
    Posts: 415
    Likes: 40, Points: 28, Legacy Rep: 399
    Location: USA

    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    Chevron says it will not dispute climate science in U.S. lawsuit | Reuters

    A Chevron attorney said in court on Wednesday that the company supports scientific conclusions that humans are causing climate change, a response to a lawsuit that accuses five major energy producers of misleading the public for years about their role in global warming.

    At a hearing in San Francisco federal court, Chevron attorney Theodore Boutrous also said that the scientific consensus about greenhouse gas emissions did not fully form until the past decade.

    The judge asked Boutrous if the other four companies agreed with his presentation, and Boutrous said he was only speaking for Chevron.

    “I’m going to ask them at some point if they agree with everything you said,” Alsup said.
     
  7. ImaginaryNumber
    Joined: May 2009
    Posts: 415
    Likes: 40, Points: 28, Legacy Rep: 399
    Location: USA

    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    The Great Pacific Garbage Patch counts 1.8 trillion pieces of trash, mostly plastic | LA Times

    The Great Pacific Garbage Patch is an accumulation of junk that has collected in the waters between California and Hawaii -- and it's getting larger. Twice the size of Texas, the floating mass of about 79,000 metric tons of plastic is up to 16 times larger than previously thought, according to scientists who performed an aerial survey. The results, published Thursday in the journal Scientific Reports, reveal that this plastic blight in the Pacific Ocean is still growing at what the researchers called an "exponential" pace.
     
  8. ImaginaryNumber
    Joined: May 2009
    Posts: 415
    Likes: 40, Points: 28, Legacy Rep: 399
    Location: USA

    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

  9. ImaginaryNumber
    Joined: May 2009
    Posts: 415
    Likes: 40, Points: 28, Legacy Rep: 399
    Location: USA

    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    Climate change threatens world's largest seagrass carbon stores | EurekAlert

    In the summer of 2010-2011, Western Australia experienced an unprecedented marine heat wave that elevated water temperatures 2-4 degrees Celsius above average for more than two months. The loss of seagrass at Shark Bay after the 2010-2011 marine heat wave released up to 9 million metric tons of CO2 into the atmosphere over the three years following the event. This amount is roughly the equivalent to the annual CO2 output of 800,000 homes, two average coal-fired power plants or 1,600,000 cars driven for 12 months.

    "This decrease [in seagrass cover at Shark Bay] is significant because seagrass meadows rank among the most intense CO2 sinks in the biosphere, giving them the name 'Blue Carbon ecosystems.' They take up and store CO2 in their soils and biomass through biosequestration. The carbon that is locked in the soils may remain there for millennia if seagrass ecosystems, which offer physical protection to these stocks, remain intact" explains Professor Carlos M. Duarte, professor at King Abdullah University of Science and Technology and co-advisor to the Ph.D. thesis of the lead author.
     
  10. ImaginaryNumber
    Joined: May 2009
    Posts: 415
    Likes: 40, Points: 28, Legacy Rep: 399
    Location: USA

    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    Google Timelapse

    Featuring select locations around the Earth.
    Miami, Brisbane, Las Vegas
    Mountain glaciers, Antarctic glaciers
    Logging in California, Solar Farm in China
    Aral Sea, Dead Sea
    etc

    [​IMG]
     
  11. ImaginaryNumber
    Joined: May 2009
    Posts: 415
    Likes: 40, Points: 28, Legacy Rep: 399
    Location: USA

    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    The Arctic’s carbon bomb might be even more potent than we thought | Washington Post

    Scientists had predicted that most of the greenhouse gases released from the carbon-rich, frozen soils of the Arctic would be less-potent carbon dioxide, rather than more-potent methane. Research published in Nature Climate Change suggests that waterlogged wetland soils, where oxygen is not prevalent, will produce a considerable volume of methane. Previous studies had not examined warming waterlogged Arctic soils over a long period of time. This study discovered that it took three years or more for the methane-generating microorganisms to really start producing.
     
  12. ImaginaryNumber
    Joined: May 2009
    Posts: 415
    Likes: 40, Points: 28, Legacy Rep: 399
    Location: USA

    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    Land degradation may affect 3.2 billion people globally | Economic Times of India

    Worsening land degradation caused by human activity is undermining the well-being of two fifths of humanity, driving species to extinction and intensifying climate change, says the world's first comprehensive evidence-based assessment of land degradation and restoration. Produced by the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES),
    land degradation cost the equivalent of about 10 per cent of the world's annual gross product in 2010, through the loss of biodiversity and ecosystem services. The report estimates in just over three decades 4 billion people will live in drylands, and 50 million-700 million people will be forced to migrate by 2050.
     
    Last edited: Apr 3, 2018
  13. ImaginaryNumber
    Joined: May 2009
    Posts: 415
    Likes: 40, Points: 28, Legacy Rep: 399
    Location: USA

    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    The Sahara is growing, thanks in part to climate change | Washington Post

    Earth’s largest hot desert, the Sahara, is getting bigger, a new study finds. Yet it is not just the spread of the Sahara that is frightening, the researchers say. It’s the timing: It is happening during the African summer, when there is usually more rain. But the precipitation has dried up, allowing the boundaries of the desert to expand.

    The study was published in the Journal of Climate.

    [​IMG]
    Son, one day all this will be yours.
     
  14. ImaginaryNumber
    Joined: May 2009
    Posts: 415
    Likes: 40, Points: 28, Legacy Rep: 399
    Location: USA

    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    Study reveals potential stability of ocean processes despite climate change | PHYS.org

    The complexity of ocean biochemical processes makes it difficult to accurately simulate how the ocean absorbs CO2 from the atmosphere and how it stores this carbon as global conditions change.
    In a new study, published in Global Biogeochemical Cycles, a more realistic representation of the marine ecosystem indicated that the ocean will take up and store carbon at similar rates regardless of global changes in physical properties, like temperature, salinity and circulation.This means that an increase in temperature and the associated reorganization in ocean circulation, for instance, has less of an effect on the marine ecosystem's ability to absorb CO2 from the atmosphere and store it in the subsurface layers of the ocean.
     

  15. ImaginaryNumber
    Joined: May 2009
    Posts: 415
    Likes: 40, Points: 28, Legacy Rep: 399
    Location: USA

    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    Big increase in Antarctic snowfall | BBC

    Scientists have compiled a record of snowfall in Antarctica going back 200 years. The study shows there has been a significant increase in precipitation over the period, up 10%.

    The effect of the extra snow locked up in Antarctica is to slightly slow a general trend in global sea-level rise. However, this mitigation is still swamped by the contribution to the height of the oceans from ice melt around the continent.

    [​IMG]
     
Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.