Ocean News

Discussion in 'All Things Boats & Boating' started by ImaginaryNumber, Oct 8, 2015.

  1. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    It's very strange. In the five weeks since the thread Our Oceans Are Under Attack has been closed, there have been over 6,000 views. Doesn't make any sense to me. Hard to believe that anyone is that passionate about reading old news and stale discussions.

    Since the moderator suggested that the general topic of ocean news was a valid topic on this forum, and because I'm curious as to whether the traffic reading the closed thread will be interested in current ocean news, I'm opening another thread on this topic.
     
  2. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

  3. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    [​IMG]

    2015 melt season in review
     
  4. Yobarnacle
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    Yobarnacle Senior Member

    So, is less arctic ice a good thing or a bad thing?
    I view it as a positive development.



    http://www.planetwater.ca/research/climpact/impacts/shipping.html
    "Economic Benefits of Climatic Change


    The decrease of arctic ice extent and the increasing open-water periods may dramatically alter not only Canada's shipping industry, but the shipping industries of much of the Northern Hemisphere. The journey by ship between Asia's Pacific coast to Western Europe covers over 12,000 nautical miles, via the Panama Canal [1]. Traveling through the arctic, via the Northwest Passage, would reduce the total distance by 1/3.

    Longer ice-free seasons in the Northwest Passage will mean longer shipping seasons, and increase the likelihood of easy transit through the Northwest Passage for at least part of the year [2]. Even the modest estimates of the increase in length of open-water periods for ice stations along the Northwest Passage [click here] indicate that this coveted waterway is currently navigable for one third of the year. If the current trends continue, the Northwest Passage could be ice-free for as much as six months of year, as soon as 30 years from now. The ice will be thin enough for a moderately reinforced hull to pass through much earlier than that.

    The opening of the Northwest Passage for shipping for at least half of the year would benefit the shipping industry economically, as manpower and fuel costs will be reduced by avoiding the longer Panama Canal route. During these open-water months, only modestly reinforced hulls would be required [1], and the need for heavy ice-breakers will be reduced.

    Politcal Concerns

    The expected increase in shipping in the Canadian Arctic has sparked debate yet again over Canada's claim to the waters of the Canadian Archipelago, especially the Northwest Passage. The United States, along with several other nations, claim that these Arctic waters form an international waterway, which must be freely navigable to all commercial ships and naval fleets [1]."
     
  5. Yobarnacle
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    Yobarnacle Senior Member

    http://coralreef.noaa.gov/aboutcorals/coral101/polypcolony/

    "How old are today's reefs? The geological record indicates that ancestors of modern coral reef ecosystems were formed at least 240 million years ago. The coral reefs existing today began growing as early as 50 million years ago. Most established coral reefs are between 5,000 and 10,000 years old. Although size sometimes indicates the age of a coral reef, this is not always true. Different species of coral grow at different rates depending on the type of coral, water temperature, water turbidity, availability of light, oxygen level, amount of turbulence, and availability of food. In general, massive corals tend to grow slowly, increasing in size from 0.5 cm to 2 cm per year. However, under favorable conditions (high light exposure, consistent temperature, moderate wave action), some species can grow as much as 4.5 cm per year."

    Since corals have survived millions of years through many climate cycles, many temperature variations, an extinction event in our time seems remote.
    new polyps build on the skeletons of old polyps.
    Bleaching currently occurring, may actually contribute to healthier reefs in the future.
    Similarly as a wildfire stimulates new growth on land.
    Who knows?
    Every observed change is currently heralded as potentially disastrous. By doomsters.
    Better get accustomed to it. Change is a constant.
    We can hope doomsters aren't.
     
  6. Yobarnacle
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    Yobarnacle Senior Member

    Are Scientists Objective?

    gscim.com/Sci/Philosophy/Are_Scientists_Objective.html

    A common misconception is that scientists are totally objective. However this is nothing but a myth. Not only are scientists human and subject to all human flaws ...
    .
    Science Ain’t Always Scientific – The Myth of ...

    wakeup-world.com/2015/05/22/science-aint-always...

    By Brendan D. Murphy. Guest Writer for Wake Up World “Real scientific endeavour does not dictate what “should” be. Ideally, it designs a sound protocol through ...
    .
    On The Myth That Scientists Are Objective | The...

    www.apologeticprofessor.com/articles/2013/12/on-the-myth...

    You can’t shake a stick these days without hitting a scientist claiming that she or he would not possibly let their biases influence their judgment.
    .
    Science under siege : the myth of objectivity in ...

    www.worldcat.org/title/science-under-siege-the-myth-of...



    Scientists are people and subject to the same biases and character flaws as the rest of us.
     
  7. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

  8. Yobarnacle
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    Yobarnacle Senior Member

    Looks like fun, NOT! :D
     
  9. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

  10. Yobarnacle
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    Yobarnacle Senior Member

    Marine, bird, and wildlife sanctuaries are good policies.
    Just and reasonable laws are also good policies.

    example:
    http://dep.state.fl.us/water/wastewater/vessel.htm
    The discharge of untreated "sewage" from boats into waters of the State is prohibited by both State law (Florida Litter Law - 403.413, F.S.) and Federal law (Clean Water Act). Note, graywater is not considered "sewage" in the law. Therefore, the discharge of graywater from boats into the sea around Florida is currently not prohibited. The law defines graywater from boats as "galley (kitchen), bath, and shower water."
    "
    Very reasonable and just law.

    "Location: Fort Myers

    http://www.sailnet.com/forums/gear-maintenance/72603-urinal-plumbed-directly-overboard.html

    Question Urinal plumbed directly overboard ?


    My last boat was 25 years old when I bought it. The head was an illegal and smelly mess. Tore out everything and installed a full size portapotti MSD with deck pumpout. No more smells.

    I was left with extra thruhulls and experimented with a urinal tube to greatly extend time between pumpouts. The 5 gallon capacity of the portapotti encouraged this thinking. I found the direct overboard drain very convenient and want to equip my next boat with a urinal.

    In the summer of 2010 I had a routine boarding by the Coast Guard at Friday Harbor in the San Juans. They gave my boat an inspection and found no infractions. I have the receipt to prove it. There were no particular questions about my sanitation installation.

    I think this post could result in some interesting positive and negative input and some nuggets of wisdom as well. Mostly male responses I reckon.

    First of all, it must be understood that urine is not sewage. Sewage is defined as solids suspended in water. Urine from healthy people is sterile and harmless to the marine environment. That being said, I imagine regional law enforcement could have various definitions of sewage, perhaps requiring urine to be controlled as graywater.

    There is at least one supplier of a compact porcelain wall urinal with plumbed flushing valve. This could make for a tasteful installation but I wonder how it could be drained by gravity only, while using a thruhull safely above the boat's waterline.

    I have used a 3/4 inch tube with a funnel clamped on the inboard end. Kept a 1/2 gallon jug with a weak vinegar/water solution nearby to provide a flush of the line after each use. Never had any odors this way, never had to risk the public display of a man pissing over the side of the boat, never risked my life falling overboard with my fly unzipped. "


    Once more, rational and reasonable.

    "regional law enforcement could have various definitions of sewage"
    Is not rational or reasonable. Government by whim never is. Unfortunately, the whims of officials are frequently ENFORCED.
     
  11. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    Megatsunami: Evidence of 800-Foot Wave Worries Experts | Nature World News
     
  12. Yobarnacle
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    Yobarnacle Senior Member

    Are you worried your number might be up, imaginary number? :D
     
  13. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    It's always good to have something to worry about. :rolleyes: How do these numbers strike you?

    The Really Big One | The New Yorker
    An earthquake will destroy a sizable portion of the coastal Northwest. The question is when.

    See also: How to Stay Safe When the Big One Comes
     
  14. Yobarnacle
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    Yobarnacle Senior Member

    At least you didn't blame manmade co2 for it. Thanks. :D
     

  15. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    It's not Lent. Please don't 'imagine' that I've given up annoying you! [​IMG]

    This is how rising seas will reshape the face of the United States | Washington Post
    [​IMG]
     
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