Nylon Weave?

Discussion in 'Materials' started by Leon01323, Apr 24, 2012.

  1. Leon01323
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    Leon01323 Junior Member

    Thanks. I've sent off an email asking what prepreg sheets this company does so waiting to hear back.

    Is nylon not one of the strongest though.

    Thanks
     
  2. Herman
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    Herman Senior Member

    One other trick is to alternate layers of nylon film with dry fabric, and press that.
     
  3. Leon01323
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    Leon01323 Junior Member

    Am I right in thinking "normal" prepreg is jut a thin sheet of nylon or other thermo plastic? The only supplier in the uk I have found has thin sheets or rolls which has uni weave impregnated in it as well ?

    Thanks
     
  4. Herman
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    Herman Senior Member

    The product we are discussing is fabric (uni, woven) which contains the nylon in it, just like a normal polyester or epoxy laminate. With the difference that you can remelt the nylon and shape it with heat.
     
  5. Leon01323
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    Leon01323 Junior Member

    Ah thats what i thought. Though all the prepregs ive come across so far are uni weave treated with high temprature epoxy which cures when formed with heat.

    will they be a mix of epoxy and nylon in them or pure nylon etc. found this company :

    http://www.ambercomposites.com/prepreg/?gclid=CNOXnb7i4a8CFVASfAod9GsMCg

    could you shed any light on that ? may have to call them :)

    Cheers
     
  6. Herman
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    Herman Senior Member

    These are all epoxy, thus thermoset prepreg. Nylon is a thermoplastic prepreg.
     
  7. Leon01323
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    Leon01323 Junior Member

  8. Herman
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    Herman Senior Member

    No, it just looks like carbon laminate. Nylon is the resin, not the fiber!
     
  9. upchurchmr
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    upchurchmr Senior Member

    A thermoplastic prepreg is some plastic heated and squeezed into a layer of Fiberglass or graphite or kevlar. The layer can be cloth or unidirectional.

    The thermoplastic and fiber is what makes it a pre-preg. Pre impregnated fiber which is used as a single layer, then stacked, and heated with vacuum and pressure to make a multi-layer laminate to use in your part.

    Thermoset pre-preg is more normal and cannot be used with the thermoplastic prepreg as far as I have ever heard.

    Very easy to get the two confused.

    Thermoplastic prepreg is more exotic and relatively unused.
     
  10. upchurchmr
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    upchurchmr Senior Member

    Leon,

    Nylon is not one of the strongest materials.
    http://machinedesign.com/BDE/materials/bdemat2/bdemat2_29.html - the maximum tensile strength for nylon in this table is 14,000 #/sq in. The strength for a graphite composite at work is 82000#/sq in. We would never use nylon for major structure - too heavy. Specialty parts with special needs, like the bending and toughness for the parts that started this off would be a completely different thing.

     
  11. Leon01323
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    Leon01323 Junior Member

    Im just lost trying to find the material i need to look into to even see if it is something i can do haha...There are obviously a lot of differnt types as you guys have help me find out.

    Is one of the reasons people use thermoset pre pregs to reduce the amount of resin that builds up during laminating a piece or is there another reason. Ive seen videos of people applying epoxy that cures at high temp and then using that to make a piece and curing it in an oven.

    If i could make one of these boards using epoxy on its own then i would. But is that strenghth achiveable at a lighjt weight?

    Thanks
     
  12. Leon01323
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    Leon01323 Junior Member

  13. Herman
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    Herman Senior Member

    Nice find. Indeed they have what we are discussing here. Unfortunately not in fabric, only UD.

    The reason for using prepreg/epoxy can be found in many factors:

    -clean
    -high tech (strength, weight)
    -do-able quality control / process control (very important for flying objects...)
     
  14. Leon01323
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    Leon01323 Junior Member

    I was reading up on their site and they can do it in different materials. I'd be inclined to go with mostly uniderectional if I could try this.

    If this ends a dead end I will try epoxy. I had good results with just chopped strand and a special core I made was very strong but I broke it doing a certain trick haha.

    Then I tried weave which did not bond with my core hence why I then got a vacuum bag.

    Thanks
     

  15. upchurchmr
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    upchurchmr Senior Member

    Leon,

    Thermoplastics, including Nylon, will have a much higher impact capability, but will be somewhat more flexible.

    Thermosets are much more common and will be higher stiffness, but will break at a lower impact load.

    You could try to make a similar board using a more flexible epoxy (Gougeon has one) but I have no idea what your results will be.
     
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