Noyo Trawler by Glen L

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Marco1, Jan 19, 2010.

  1. Marco1
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    Marco1 Senior Member

  2. Manie B
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    Manie B Senior Member

  3. Kaluvic
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    Kaluvic New guy

    Don't know much about it but my first impression is poor visibility for gunk holing.
     
  4. Marco1
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    Marco1 Senior Member

    That boat look really nice. My only observation is that it seems smaller and it is a planing hull requiring a bigger engine. I was thinking more in a displacement hull. For speed I have a seadoo 180 to pull the girls on the ski. I happen to have a Kubota V1505 35HP with 2:1 gearbox I purchased new to put in an old Halvo, but the purchase of the Halvo fell through so I now have a new engine and would like to build a boat around it.
    I initially found this boat but it is a much bigger project and requires a much larger engine. I also have to watch the draft since at low tide I have a few sand banks on the way to my house.
     
  5. Marco1
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    Marco1 Senior Member

  6. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    Not that I want to speak for Manie, just my 2C.

    The 28ft trawler is a nice and proven design. (btw at least one was built in Turkey)
    It looks like it would fit your requirements almost perfect.
    But I doubt they send the precut ply to OZ!? And if, what would it cost? I have seen (no mainly heard about) homebuilts were the people imported Western Red Cedar to Asia, just because the scantlings were based on that.
    I think it will be better to ask for a cutting plan sent to your local mill. (they will probably not send it to a homebuilder)

    Regards
    Richard
     
  7. Manie B
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    Manie B Senior Member

    I agree with Richard and i also doubt if a kit would be economical

    also remember that lofting and cutting plywood panels for a hull is a very small percentage of the overall build

    I like the trawler but at 56 sheets of plywood and 39 gallons of epoxy it is one hell of a lot bigger and more expensive than the DE23 at 36 sheets and 26 gallons
    please believe me it is double the boat at double the price and double the headaches
    dont build a boat around an engine in your garage

    fisrtly indentify your minimum requirements - dont go overboard else it will never happen
    The DE23 with a Honda 50 four stroke is a gem and very light on fuel for this application

    the guys around here know me and they also know what i am going to say next
    start small
    build something like this first
    http://www.bateau.com/studyplans/V10_study.htm?prod=V10

    a small dinghy is a fun way to start
    you learn to work with the materials (epoxy etc)
    you start collecting and endless stream of tools and clamps
    you sort out your workspace
    you sort out your life - this is a very serious matter - boat building could lead to divorce :D
    and then you will know if you are truly a boat builder and your family accepts this "new" dad

    as you probably realise i am on my fifth build, building my "dream" boat which is a microcruiser at five metres = 16 foot long
    the first boat i was going to build when i was in the same place as you are now, would have been an Easy catamaran at 40 feet
    shows you how my little chigger and portoguese dory changed my attitude :D

    sure dream big BUT start small - at least you end up with a boat
    not a yard full of eyesore junk that takes 12 years to finish :D

    enjoy :D
     
  8. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    I don't like Glen-L designs because they are very boxy. The visibility in that steering station is very poor and not to standards.
     
  9. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    Yes Manie, but there is a hughe advantage of these kits. The builder can see a boatshape result in no time! That does encourage quite a bit.

    I agree, that, if this is the first boat ever, one should do a dinghi or canoe first.

    Building a vessel around a engine is a method I have choosen too. On another scale though.
    But I think when puttering around at moderate speed in moderate conditions is the goal, and so I understand it, the existing engine will do a proper job.

    Concur. The picture above shows a very poor layout. But the Helmsman can at least see the oncoming weather.

    Regards
    Richard
     
  10. Manie B
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    Manie B Senior Member

    gonzo i agree

    they are old and sometimes a bit tired
    as we discussed here

    http://www.boatdesign.net/forums/boat-building/building-methods-29256.html

    for many new builders it often makes more sense to build in epoxy and marine ply with a hard chine design
    we have all proved it over and over that a multi chine design is perfectly good for a cruising boat AND easy to build, resistance values are marginally higher so fuel consumption is as good as it gets
    those old designs are good for "traditional" builders that want to recapture the romance of a forgotten era
    if you want to get to the water quickly go new
    epoxy and ply is the invention of the millennium
     
  11. rasorinc
    Joined: Nov 2007
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    rasorinc Senior Member

    Have you looked at the customers photos on the Glen=L site? Lots of people have built that boat and plans are great and an easy build. Their forum is great also and you will get lots of help.
     
  12. Manie B
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    Manie B Senior Member

  13. Marco1
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    Marco1 Senior Member

    Hi guys, and thank you for the many replies. I realise that the difference between the DE23 and the TW28 is more than just 5 foot. I am glad to hear that it is a good choice for my requirements and will make sure I got the space and time to pull it off before I start.

    I did consider builidng a smaller boat like the Simon skiff 18 or similar but find it hard to find the motivation to build something I don't need. I am a carpenter, (even when in a previous life I was first a blacksmith and then a diesel mechanic) and have built large two story buildings, down to small furniture, doors and windows, shutters and even spiral staircases complete with the laminated handrail just for fun. Still...a boat is a different challenge, particulalry because of the resin/glass component even when stitch and glue is supposed to be easier than more traditional methods.

    I had a go at applying a few lyers of glass and poliester resin to an old Chris-Craft, and remember it was not as easy as 1,2,3. Probably can take a course at the local trade college before I get started.

    I see the major challenge being space and neighbours since the only place I could build it and take away cheaply is on my front lawn. Will have to build a temporary shelter though, ugly and intrusive.
    I could of course convince my wife it is better to use the backyard, but it would require a crane to lift it out over the house and that is probably not cheap even when not impossible. Most backyard glass pools are delivered that way.
    Third option is to build it at my weekender, plenty of room and have my own slipway, however it will severely cut down the time dedicated to build, to a day or two a week.

    I will have to make enquiries as to the cost of importing plywood precut, and the local plywood cut by miself or third party. I am familiar with importing from the US and have done so many times over. A packet of plywood is not a problem and it is cheap to ship. Probably only hassle will be phytosanitary treatment. Resin is a different proposition. I have never imported hazardous chemicals and would need to ask my agent. Plenty of epoxy available locally, probably not as cheap as yours though. Everything in Australia, besides Kangaroo meat is dearer due to the small population/market... or so they want us to believe.

    Will keep on working on this project. I know now that GlenL is out. Let's see what I get started with.

    One last question. How would the DE23 perform with a Kubota V1505?
    http://www.kubotaengine.com/products/05/v1505_e3_2.html
     
  14. Manie B
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    Manie B Senior Member

    The Kubota are good motors, i am in plant hire and work with small engines all frikken day.

    keep in mind that you would gear and prop the engine to give WOT approx 90% of recommended rpm to prevent over revving
    You would probably normally cruise at 2200 rpm which usually translates to relatively good fuel consumption for the V1505-E3B

    this could mean that after losses of gearing / shafts etc. you could end up with as little as 25 hp WOT - which is little

    sure its a good motor, but the controls and "gearing" forward, neutral, reverse is expensive
    prop shaft and seals / stuffing boxes, are not cheap anywhere
    vibration free mounting and cooling and exhaust is a major headache
    the 40A alternator is nice but the bellhousing to connect motor to gear box is also expensive

    do your homework of costs in your area
    and then compare to a Honda 50 four stroke
    my bet is that the outboard will be much cheaper and easier, even in your country

    the kubota will be "fun" for a while
    but the NVH will get to you and the underpower is deffinately not nice

    the Hondas are very quiet and smooth and sip fuel by comparison

    go here and read a wonderfull story that always tugged at my heart, who knows maybe one day in my next life i can go there also

    http://www.geocities.com/bill_fiero/

    http://www.c-brats.com/portal.php?sid=722afaf60f624d79ac91e0e30563a18a

    these pages CLEARLY illustrate that the DE23 is up to the job and you and your family will have endless enjoyment from it
    go honda
     

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  15. Manie B
    Joined: Sep 2006
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    Manie B Senior Member

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