Northwest passage

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by BATAAN, Aug 26, 2011.

  1. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    And Bataan..If the Yacht is still accessible, cruise by and ask how they dealt with garbage... solid waste. For me, on a long cruise, garbage is a big issue. I carry a purpose built 150 liter aluminum garbage drum aft in the lazarette.. With best practice and a stalk of timber to tamp it down, this equals about three or four weeks of solid waste...cans, glass, plastic... for a crew of 5. How did they deal with 90 days of solid waste ?
     
  2. BATAAN
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    BATAAN Senior Member

    Michael, the vessel is gone, bound south for the canal and home to UK, so I cannot ask, but it is a very real concern.
    Solid waste is always building up and some must be legally dumped when far from shore sometimes, like glass and tins, but never plastic.
    Your compression method sounds like a good idea.
    On BERTIE we try to make as little waste as possible, and keep the bags on deck.
    When cruising in Desolation Sound, a fellow on a recycling barge took them from us, and charged us $10 per bag to do so.
    Many small isolated communities we visit by boat don't want our trash, and I can understand why. It's not the big city and there's no local landfill or disposal site.
     
  3. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    The question was ...when designing an exploration type vessel , what features are needed ?

    At present Im on a cruise . Onboard is 60 ltrs of waste lube oil, 20 liters of waste diesel oil and several buckets full of filters and assorted toxics.

    These waste issues must be addressed. Its unacceptable to venture into pristine, remote territory unless the yacht is properly fit out
     
  4. BATAAN
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    BATAAN Senior Member

    If necessary to change and store used oil on a cruise, it must be a prolonged one, as the usual procedure is to do this before leaving.
    60 liters of used oil?
    This seems quite excessive and you must have a large vessel with more than one engine or generator. In the NW US where I live most marinas have a waste oil disposal facility. The vessel in the original posting has a Yanmar of about 40 hp and uses little oil.
    Commercial vessels have storage tanks for used fluids. Most yachts lack the space for such. Personally I never discharge anything illegal.
    Any voyaging vessel, not just in high latitudes like the NW passage, must deal with its own waste in a responsible and thoughtful way, as the ocean is not our garbage dump.
    Any NW passage vessel needs room, displacement and stability for multiple standard 55 gallon drums on deck to store fuel and used oil.
     
  5. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    For the past 40 years Ive been a full time sailor. Im in the wheelhouse right now.. 8933 miles into a 5 month cruise. Oil changes happen every 250 hrs. 50 liters in the main engine oil sump... No way around it.

    Many times it can be weeks until I come across a port with proper Marpol facilites. Its the same with solid waste...difficult to responsibly dispose. Vessels planning on long self sufficient cruises must consider these details.
     

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  6. Milehog
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    Milehog Clever Quip

    Can waste engine oil be filtered enough to be mixed with diesel fuel? I've seen old timer heavy equipment operaters and truck drivers do this, dosen't necessarily mean it's a good idea though.
     
  7. BATAAN
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    BATAAN Senior Member

    So this seems like an argument for larger displacement in a NW passage vessel. Noted.
    Original voyagers left with 5 years supplies on their primitive and unacceptable vessel (in modern eyes).
    Seems shallow draft (under 2m) would be good, ability to power for long periods of time and make good use of favorable winds with a large rig, carry vast amounts of supplies and waste. Must be strong enough to freeze in and resist grinding ice at other times.
    Maybe Amundsen wasn't so far off the mark in the ideal vessel.
     

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  8. BATAAN
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    BATAAN Senior Member

    Sounds like a good idea to explore and find out more about. Thanks for the tip.
     
  9. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    Larger displacement ? or a sophisticated program with internal backup....not backup provided by the taxpayer. It cracks me up when I hear people state that they deserve freedom of the seas at the public's expense.

    As for filtering and re burning waste oil..probably. Best advised to be very careful about this concept when operating far from assistance.
     
  10. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    As to design..from my experience a good boat for sailing in difficult geography would be one who could ground out and stand on her own bottom
     

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  11. MikeJohns
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    MikeJohns Senior Member

    Overall convenience and resulting comfort at anchor goes up as draft goes down. So many options for shelter are denied the deeper draft boats. That could be a real asset exploring high latitudes.

    But caught in heavy weather i'd choose an entirely different hullform.
     
  12. cor
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    cor Senior Member

    I have never been through the NW passage, but I live about 40 miles from the western end of it. Just about any boat with a reasonable range under power could make the trip, as long as you have the patience to wait for the ice. Having the proper communication equipment to get ice reports would help eliminate some of the need for patience.

    C.O.
    http://www.rudstrom.blogspot.com/
     
  13. Tad
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    Tad Boat Designer

  14. Tad
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    Tad Boat Designer


  15. John1234
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    John1234 Junior Member

    Hmmmm...

    Steel Hulls? Lengths of 100 feet? Years of provision and harmful chemicals? Rescue and navigation electronics? Specialized gear? Lets just bring along the condominium and stake a claim.

    Let me see. The Inuit have been navigating for thousands of years on animal skin kayaks with bone frames, designed and built long before mathematics and engineering surfaced to their left brains. Those scantlings must have been engineered by aliens from another planet that didn't know the definition of money. Just saying.;)

    Open up the world's waters to anyone that wants to walk on water if you ask me, whether they be liquid, solid, frozen or boiling.
     
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