Nissan LD28

Discussion in 'Diesel Engines' started by Saqa, Jun 28, 2014.

  1. Saqa
    Joined: Oct 2013
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    Location: Hervey Bay

    Saqa Senior Member

    Hi guys, is this a suitable candidate for boat use? I have two of these that were meant to go in a 1600kg car but I put them aside for future use on something else. I am currently looking at some DIY plate cats in the 22' size. Does anyone know about resources in Australia or online for marinizing these? and if they would have the power to drive a boat like that?
     
  2. d1970
    Joined: Jun 2012
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    Location: canada

    d1970 Junior Member

    In automobile applications they are good units,albeit underpowered by today's standards.
    I'm not sure how they will fare with the continuous load,though I'd think they are quite a bit tougher than the vw's used by another member here on his cat. If you leave them naturally aspirated, I would expect a decent life out of them with regular maintenance and no mishaps.
    Will leave the other q's for the experts :)
    Good luck with the project and make a thread with pics when you go at it!

    Edit : Google turns out a few results. Seems it has been in use in marine applications for decades.
     
  3. Saqa
    Joined: Oct 2013
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    Location: Hervey Bay

    Saqa Senior Member

    Excellent, thanks for that. I didnt even think to google it :)
     
  4. garthbishop
    Joined: Jul 2014
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    Location: Philippines

    garthbishop Junior Member

    I was told NOT to use car engines with TIMING BELTS,,,, go for the older PUSH ROD TYPES...
     
  5. Petros
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    Petros Senior Member

    interesting advice about the timing belts. I presume because a broken belt would leave you stranded with a badly trashed engine. In auto/truck applications the belt has proven to be very reliable as long as it is changed at the proper interval. Personally I actually prefer the belt over push rod or timing chains, at least in the automobile applications. Do not the VW engines use a belt? I would think the Nissan is a much more reliable and durable engine over the VW. I have also seen many gasoline auto engines adapted to marine use, that also use the timing belt.

    Perhaps it is just obsolete fears, or old fashioned thinking. A modern and reliable timing belt equipped engine would be a far better choice I would think than a old, unreliable push rod engine, particularly if parts are hard to find.
     
  6. garthbishop
    Joined: Jul 2014
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    Location: Philippines

    garthbishop Junior Member

    Also i have thought the same... Harley Davidson motor-cycles replace the chain with the TOOTHED BELTS... These big bikes would sure put more torque load on these belts... My friends Hyundai Galloper diesel engine broke the timing belt,, but did NOT damage the engine.. He replaced the belt and drove off... Here in PHILIPPINES ,,, MOST SPEEDOMETERS ARE DISCONNECTED,, 20 year old cars advertised as LOW MILAGE hehehe... or connect the speedometer when selling,, shows 50,000 klms instead of 500,000 klms done,,, hehehe..
     
  7. Westfield 11
    Joined: Apr 2008
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    Location: Los Angeles

    Westfield 11 Senior Member

    It depends if you have an interference engine on a non-interference type. In the former if the belt breaks, the pistons will hit the valves, in a non-interference type they won't. If you are worried, use an engine with a timing chain instead. It has been a long time since any Japanese company built an engine with a pushrod, they are all overhead cam instead. Did your "experts" tell you to avoid EFI in favor of carburetors as well? Is 1960's technology supposed to be more reliable than more contemporary tech?
     
  8. garthbishop
    Joined: Jul 2014
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    Location: Philippines

    garthbishop Junior Member

    I was going Diesel because i thought Gasoline can be more dangerous and prone to fire.. Here in Philippines the old timing chain diesels Isuzu,, Nissan,, Kia,, good condition for US$600 to US$800 with gearbox..
     

  9. Saqa
    Joined: Oct 2013
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    Location: Hervey Bay

    Saqa Senior Member

    Looks like this engine needs a turbo anyway for a nice strong output. Fitted one to a car and she is a pig now. Engine used to have a turbo on it when it was in that car previously and performed much better then. Too heavy for what lil power it can put out. I now also have a 5 cyl 2.5L Volvo engine, petrol. The car it came from was fun to drive with some decent acceleration and hit 200kmph without any stress and fuss in a heavy station wagon (estate) vehicle. The Nissan on the other hand is completely uninspiring
     
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