Nicopress and 1x19

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by frolicsailing, Sep 7, 2007.

  1. Landlubber
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    Landlubber Senior Member

    1/19 is quite suitable to press swage, sorry gonzo, but it is very normal here to do so, and i have done it for at least 40 years myself. Only one swage is needed, and the wire is left just exposed from the end or the swage.
     
  2. Landlubber
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    Landlubber Senior Member

    ...if perchance you are concerned about the hand swaging, just spend the few dollars required for roll hydraulic pressing, it is there for a long time, so just spend the money on wire above 3/16", so much easier.
     
  3. wolfenzee
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    wolfenzee Junior Member

    My problem is not so much that of the swage, but rather the soft eye. I have a wooden mast and the standing rigging goes up around the mast and back onto itself (with a block of wood nailed to the mast called a mast hound keeping it up there). To do this 7-19 wire with a serving is either required or preferred.
    Even though it wasn't done 30 years ago (with no ill effect) it was suggested I put tar in the exposed end of the wire to prevent the main argument against using nicopress rigging (sea water getting down in there and causing corrosion)
     
  4. wolfenzee
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    wolfenzee Junior Member

    Where you talking about a mechanical flemish splice [​IMG]

    or a "proper splice"
    [​IMG]
    finding someone to splice wire no a days can get expensive, especially considering I would have around 20 splices necessary
     
  5. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

  6. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    The flemish eye splice has no tucks and is stronger than the liverpool tucked splice. The copper sleave in the picture has no effect on the strength of the Flemish eye.
     
  7. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    The copper sleeve is just a finish to keep the tucks from getting snagged.
     
  8. Landlubber
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    Landlubber Senior Member

    Yes, that one works well.
     
  9. xlr8
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    xlr8 Junior Member

    I am a professional rigger for more than 30 years. At first I don't recommend using 7 x 19 wire for standing rigging as this wire stretches a lot. This wire was developed for running rigging. Before the introduction of 1 x 19, 6 x 7 and 7 x 7 were used for standing rigging, these wires are flexible enough to splice or to swage with copper ferrule. Do not use aluminium ferrule for stainless wire as this is intended to use for galvanized wire.
    Normally I don't recommend using 1 x 19 wire over 3/16" for nicopress swage as the outer strands tends to open up. This means the inner strands take most of load and end up in reducing total tensile strength.
    I you have low budget project, you can use larger thimble for this and weld open end and weld a channel bar inside thimble to prevent thimble from deforming. Hope this can help.
     
  10. wolfenzee
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    wolfenzee Junior Member

    Because my boat is wood with a wood mast if I used the fancy expensive low stretch rigging and high tech sails, I'd damage the boat. Nice to know that I shouldn't use the stuff I can afford anyway.
     
  11. DCockey
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    DCockey Senior Member

    The amount of stretch is relative. 7x19 stretches a little over twice what 1x19 does for the same load. For a racing or performance oriented boat that wouldn't be acceptable. For a cruising boat, particularly one with a more traditional type of rig, I doubt it would make a noticeable difference.

    Do you know of a current source for 7x7 wire in stainless steel wuitable for marine use?
     
  12. wolfenzee
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    wolfenzee Junior Member

    Dyna form wire (sometimes called "compact")is smaller in dia. for the same strength and stretches 30% less than 1x19
     
  13. xlr8
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    xlr8 Junior Member

    Stretchy wire causes mast to bend too much and whole rig falls to leeward. Traditional wooden spars have higher safety factors means they have more moment of inertia compare to modern spars. Loading of rigs are same between modern or traditional rig.
    Dyform(Compact) wire must be terminal swaged or use Norseman type fittings. They are very stiff.
     
  14. DCockey
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    DCockey Senior Member

    "Too much" depends on the design of the rig and how the boat is used. NOt all boats are designed to maximize performance. Not every person who sails puts performance at the top of their list.
     

  15. Landlubber
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    Landlubber Senior Member

    Not every person who sails puts performance at the top of their list.....emmm no not until another boat just ahead starts to fall back as you gather him up......
     
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