Newbie pls help guide me

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by Lion warrior, Mar 8, 2010.

  1. Lion warrior
    Joined: Mar 2010
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    Lion warrior Junior Member

    I have never built a boat. I'm really wanting to learn how to build one but am kinda stuck on where to start. I know I want to build a wooden boat and would like for it to be an outboard that sits two people at least but is cost effective and easy to build. Anyone have any suggestions what I should start with? How much does building a boat really cost? More importantly where is the best place to get plans? Any help would be greatly appreciated. I know I have a lotto learn.
     
  2. hoytedow
    Joined: Sep 2009
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    hoytedow Carbon Based Life Form

    The cost depends upon the size and quality of the boat. First gather a materials needed list. Then check the internet for prices of each material.

    For example:

    x sheets of 1/4 inch plywood marine grade @ $X per sheet =_________

    x 1" #6 s.s. screws @ $.X per screw =_________

    x gallons epoxy resin @ $X per gallon =_________

    x yards fiberglass cloth @ $X per yard =_________

    x feet of whatever wood for stringers @ $X per foot =_________​
    and the list goes on.

    Total the right hand column and don't forget to save all receipts for the state to issue a clear title when completed.

    The above list could be entirely different depending upon building method and materials chosen. Read this forum and gain much knowledge before starting your project. Take photos as you progress and post them here.
    Happy building.:)
     
  3. Lion warrior
    Joined: Mar 2010
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    Lion warrior Junior Member

    Thanks! I didn't even think about saving the receipts.
     
  4. Guest625101138

    Guest625101138 Previous Member

    1 person likes this.
  5. hoytedow
    Joined: Sep 2009
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    hoytedow Carbon Based Life Form

    Rick, that is an excellent thread to suggest to the newbie.:cool:
     
  6. robertgrandbois
    Joined: Mar 2010
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    Location: West arm nipissing

    robertgrandbois Junior Member

    I built a S&G 14 ft skiff last year. I never have been a woodworker and did not have any tools. The experience was rewarding and had alot of fun doing it. I encourage you to do it I did a great job and the boat is just beautiful. there is no greater feeling then ridin in YOUR boat.
     
  7. Lion warrior
    Joined: Mar 2010
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    Lion warrior Junior Member

    I'm still on the fence about it... Trying to do more research to figure out how it all works. Unfortunately I can't find anyone around my area that has ever built one and I don't like messing up.... It sounds like a lot of fun and I'd love to ride around in my own boat. Guess I'll keep reading and trying to figure it out till I'm confident on how to do it.
     
  8. rasorinc
    Joined: Nov 2007
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    rasorinc Senior Member

    Go to the Glen L marine design site. On the left hand side click on BOAT PLANS the click on outboards. There are dozens to look at then go to customer photos for building pictures. http://www.glen-l.com/
     
  9. Lion warrior
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    Lion warrior Junior Member

    I've looked at that site over a hundred times. I've bee really tempted to order a plan. Have you personally built any boats with their plans? I really like their outboards.
     
  10. rasorinc
    Joined: Nov 2007
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    rasorinc Senior Member

    I built the Flying Saucer, my first build, in------------------1958. Junior in high school and cut out all the frames in woodshop.
    I'm now building the Bearcat, which I'm putting on hold awhile, and am currently cutting out franes for the Cuddy sport which can be inboard or out.
    I will put in inboard engine stringers though build the transon for 2 outboards or one. Money will guide me which engine combo I go with. Eventually it will be an inboard but I also want a kicker engine. Best of both worlds for me at this time. Buy a study plan of somethine you like and join their forum also so you can talk to builders of the actual boat you like. Best, Stan
    PS---DON'T BUILD TO SMALL AS YOU ALWAYS SEEM TO WANT ROOM. IT IT CAN CARRY 4 YOUR WORLD OPENS UP.
     
  11. Stumble
    Joined: Oct 2008
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    Stumble Senior Member

    Lion,

    Welcome to the addiction!

    It can be great to build your own boat, incredibly rewarding, any you will have a much better understanding of how all boats are made after the process is over. My advice is to most definatly buy a set of plans, and for your first build follow them very closely, and be willing to toss pieces away if they don't come out quite right. Since minor measuring errors always seem to magnify as a build goes on.

    My working method is to measure twice, then cut, then measure again. Normally i then toss thie piece away and do it over to get it exacally right. :p


    Also be aware that it will likely take longer than you initially think it will to complete, particularly if you have a family that demands time from you.
     
  12. Lion warrior
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    Lion warrior Junior Member

    Thanks stumble! I figure that no matter which way I go, it will take me a long time. The only time I could work on it would be evenings and weekends... Right now I'm trying to figure out how complicated fiberglass boats are to build. I'm not sure which would be best and actually I'm having a hard time figuring out how you build a fiberglass one. It seems wood and fiberglass blend in together. For instance most of the things I've read the boat starts out as a wood build then they put fiberglass over it.... Is that a wood or fiberglass build? Is fiberglass strictly layers of fiberglass built around a mold? If so what keeps it's structure in tact? I'm sure I sound dumb to experts out there but everything I've been reading is confusing me. Lol.
     
  13. Stumble
    Joined: Oct 2008
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    Stumble Senior Member

    Lion,

    Just a very brief synopsis of building techniquest leaving out all of the detail from the processes:

    Wood: build a frame for the boat normally comprised of the keel, and stringers (lateral structures) then lay planks on the outside of the stringers for the hull.

    Fiberglass: Build a negative mold(the interior contor) of the hull just like in wood construction, then place layers of resin inpregnated fiberglass mat over the mold until you reach the desired thickness, remove the mold.

    Now these are the very basics, but as you can see fiberglass boats almost demand a multi boat production run to be worth the trouble since there is a lot of work spent building the mold. Which is why almost all privatly build boats are wood, and because of the sped up time once the mold is compleated why almost all commercial boats are fiberglass.

    Notice that is is very common to build a wooden hull, then wrap it in fiberglass to provide abrasion and wear protection. The difference here is that the fiberglass instead of being an inch or more thick may only be two layers (1/8 inch) per side of the wood thick.

    Personally for a first time build I would recommend building a wooden boat from a set of plans, and marrying that to a commercially manufactured mechanical parts. But as for specific boat designs... there are hundreds on the web that offer plans for just a few hundred dollars which while it may sould like a lot is probably going to be the cheapest purchase for the build.

    Just a few webistes with plans for sail:
    http://www.duckworksbbs.com/index.htm
    http://www.instantboats.com/boats.html
    http://www.glen-l.com/

    I would just peruse them looking for something you like, but then limit yourself to boats that have actual people that have built them, and perferably will advise you as you go if you run into problems.
     
  14. lewisboats
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    lewisboats Obsessed Member


  15. sean-nós
    Joined: May 2010
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    Location: Dublin,Ireland

    sean-nós Senior Member

    Hi this is a link to my Glen-L malahini it was built in a year of evenings and a bit at the weekend, most of the timber I got from a local woodworking shop bins "one mans rubbish another mans gold" for the engine I put an add in all the free adds looking for any old engines running or not and got lots of replies and picked out 4 engines two 50hp and two 80hp one of the 50 engine was sized and the other ones gearbox so I just matched them up.All the fittings were bought on ebay.I had never built a boat or worked with fiberglass before but with the book from glen l and the help on the forum it was not too hard.

    http://s753.photobucket.com/albums/xx179/fergalbutler/
     
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