Newbie Here. What's wrong...

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Connie C, Oct 26, 2015.

  1. Oleboynow

    Oleboynow Previous Member

    You arefunny
    Try steering you boat to a distant point and set acourse NOT Allowing for the current
    See where you end up
    Sailed since age 13
    Done Ocean crossings as Skipper
    Been atsea asEngineer
    Still what do I know
    Good luck . You seem like a nice guy
    Exacty But if you are not aware of a current
    Then in the
    Middle of the night you will endup on the bricks
     
  2. Waterwitch
    Joined: Oct 2012
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    Location: North East USA

    Waterwitch Junior Member

    Oleboynow I think is saying there seems to be a lack of lateral resistance in the hull form that Par has drawn.
     
  3. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Egress has the same accommodation for resisting leeway as most boats of her configuration. In her case she has twin skegs aft, sufficient lateral area, thrust vectored propulsion and assuming a skipper with half a brain, more than capable to the currents she'd likely see. No one is or should suggest she's a serious passage maker, but compared to most houseboats, she's far superior. Most currents will not be an issue, as she'll power through (an easily motivated hull form), though you're correct some course plans and possibly corrections, might be necessary, but this isn't the fault or responsibility of the hull form so much as the person handling her.

    I'm not sure what complaint you're attempting to offer, but she's not going to march around anything, if on her hook(s) properly, particularly with a steadying sail hoisted off her mast. I have a few of these types of design under my belt now, so you'll need to qualify your comments a bit, or maybe it's simply a translation issue I'm having offence with.
     
  4. whitepointer23

    whitepointer23 Previous Member

    You won't win this argument par. Must be a translation thing. I like your version better than a boxy old house boat .
     
  5. Oleboynow

    Oleboynow Previous Member

    Yes she will march around her anchor
    And the lil skegs are nothing
    Accept critique if you put up a design
    The Dutch have used lee boards for Eons
    Learn
     
  6. Connie C
    Joined: Oct 2015
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    Location: Florida

    Connie C Junior Member

    PAR, okay, here's what I want. A little houseboat for weekend and sometimes vacation (weeklong) cruises several times a year, in sheltered waters of the upper Gulf Coast, anywhere in the area from New Orleans to Appalachicola. Trailer the boat from Pensacola to St. Joseph's Peninsula, or Choctawhatchee Bay, or St. Andrews Bay. Or leave Pensacola on the water and cruise Santa Rosa Sound, or the Intracoastal Waterway in South Alabama, along the Redneck Riviera.

    I don't want to fish. I don't want to race. I want to travel along the coast and in the evening, anchor and fix something for supper and eat on the deck. Maybe now and then, dock at a waterfront restaurant for a seafood supper... Then, in the evening, hubs can watch TV and I can write.

    I think my drawings convey what I want as far as accommodations -- a place to cook, a place to eat, two places to sleep, the helm, a head with a porta pot and a camping-bag shower (or a pump-sprayer shower), a some lockers for stowage, and a computer desk. For the hubs, a television. A place under the cabin sole for freshwater and gray water tanks -- capacity? I dunno, fifteen or so gallons each?

    Electricity generation for a compact refrigerator, a small household air conditioner, husband's TV and my computer. At certain times of the year, the AC would not be needed, but in summer down here, it's a must.

    I want to learn about solar energy and deep cycle batteries, etc., to power these appliances. Perhaps also a small camping generator.

    We have lived on the Florida coast since 1980. It's not Paradise, exactly, but close ... and we basically have never taken the time to enjoy it. Now that retirement is approaching, a boat suitable for an old fart and and old broad seems like a great way to enjoy our area. Not everyone gets to live where the water meets the land. We do, and we need to appreciate it more.

    "Winnebago ...old fishing shack... old crab peeler's shack... on a barge." Well, at least you didn't call my little shantyboat a garbage scow. I get that you don't like boats that are a little boxy structure on a platform. I do like them. If I had wanted a pointy-bow boat, I wouldn't have asked about shantyboats. I'm asking because this is new to me, and it seemed like a good way to learn.
     
  7. Oleboynow

    Oleboynow Previous Member

    I do not think so
    <removed>
    Just listen Brendon
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 27, 2015
  8. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    Location: Australia

    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Which is not relevant to "currents", all the lateral resistance in the world won't stop the current taking the boat off course. Maybe it is a translation issue.
     
  9. Oleboynow

    Oleboynow Previous Member

    Pars boat will make 20 degree leeway in a breeze
    An Etchell a fraction
    But yes current will dfift the boat with it, tanker or canoe
     
  10. whitepointer23

    whitepointer23 Previous Member

    I guess you must have posted an insult but i did not get to see it. No problem. I understand you have knowledge but to assume no one else does is a bit pompous. You started sailing at 13 ? , were you a late starter. Have you ever anchored an outboard powered boat in a current with the leg up. They dance around a lot. Put the leg down and they behave a lot better. Same with skegs.
     
  11. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    I once met a guy who claimed his boat would not rise on plane heading upstream against a strong river current, but if he took off heading downstream, planing was a soda ! What's worse, I think he actually believed it !
     
  12. waikikin
    Joined: Jan 2006
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    Location: Australia

    waikikin Senior Member

    I built a houseboat once, amongst a few other boats. At the time had not much dough & needed to build something. I made it a little more complicated than it could have been by putting a little flare into the sides- could have been straight up and down & instead of 24' long used the off cut from the swim end(sloping front of hull) to extend the sides to 25'- really just should have left it at the three 8' sheets long, the cabin was 4' high & the sides sloped in about 3" which was good, to give headroom there was about 2" of sideways spring in the 8' wide bottom & there was about 4-5" of camber in the cabin top, I use steel square hollow section bent for the deck beams about 1 & 1/4 with end brackets that capped the end of the hollow sothe headroom under the beams was about 6'4" down the middle, the fitout was simple, there was benches/seats/beds down each side these were cut from 4' wide sheets, the width was determined by available foam mattress/cushion strait fro the shop, about 800mm or so, a table forward between the benches & the forward door opened over the table so a cool breeze could come in, the bathroom was port aft in the cabin & alighned with the seats, the longtidudinal seat formed framing and ran full length of the boat, galley was same width as seats, the topsides/hull side had some aft trim cut into them so 2" higher at bow than stern- again un nessesary complication... the window to bathroom was just a circle of tinted perspex, the main cabin windows were recycled french doors.... this was not so good but "looked" good- construction of these leaked- would have been better to just style cut some perspex but they came free plus a bit of work.... the aft deck and foredeck were flush with the top of the side peices- this meant that you could see forward over the cabin which can be important.... I sold it to a bloke with an island on a river up the coast, with the money I bought an engagement ring, best bucks I ever spent..

    The above was fairly materials efficient & not that much windage, maybe not the best boat but plenty adequate..

    Jeff.
     
  13. waikikin
    Joined: Jan 2006
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    waikikin Senior Member

    I love crab, best seafood ever, if I ever build another houseboat I might call her the "Blue Swimmer" after the crabs we have here... mmmm MMmm, sweetest meat from the sea! Second might be "Crab Peelers Shack":cool:

    Jeff.
     
  14. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    Location: Australia

    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Funny thread this, oleboynow says a boat will "crab" because it lacks lateral resistance, then got a little crabby talking about the problem. The only thing missing is the crabs to eat, I am getting hungry !
     

  15. Connie C
    Joined: Oct 2015
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    Location: Florida

    Connie C Junior Member

    PAR says, "It's trailerable, can take on rivers, bays and modest coastal cruising. A houseboat/shantyboat can't do any of these things, except get dragged on a trailer."

    Apparently, this houseboat/shanty boat can do some of those things -- at least, this one can take on a barge canal. Built from Lisa B. Good plans.

    "My Launching was in Lockport, NY. I then motored to Seneca Falls, back to Lockport, then East again to haul out at Mid Lakes Navigation after 18 days. I logged 320 miles averaging 5 mph on gps. Top speed around 7 with an East bound current of 1+ mph. Fuel economy typically calculated at 14 mpg. WOW. The big boys were getting 1 to 1.5 mpg. Waves are not an issue on the NYS Barge Canal, but the boat took a few (illegal) wakes of 1 to 2 feet without incident. the waves slapped the bow, came down inside the rails, and shipped out the sides without slowing her down too much." http://www.duckworksmagazine.com/09/projects/lisabgood/

    I don't know what water these two Lisa B's are cruising, but they seem to be taking it on quite well. I think the paddle wheels, smoke stacks and wheel house on the Good Enuff are silly, but they don't seem to be hampering the little shandyboat any. And the Just Mus'in appears to be having no trouble "taking on" this body of water, whatever/wherever it is.

    Just a suggestion, re: the videos. You might turn your sound down or off before playing....

    https://youtu.be/kY9dWRtwiTQ
    https://youtu.be/mc4QUEJTQ4I
    https://youtu.be/kv6fTrmmVxU
     
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