Newbie builder question, help is appreciated

Discussion in 'Materials' started by Florida_Skiffs, Feb 21, 2013.

  1. Florida_Skiffs
    Joined: Feb 2013
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    Florida_Skiffs Junior Member

    Im building my first boat, a lumber yard skiff. Or based something off the lumber yard skiff, but when im done it wont be considered a lys. I was planning on using 3/4 meranti on the bottom, and 1/2 meranti on the side, Covered in 1208 fiberglass. If im covering the inside and outside is it really that important to use marine grade wood? I dont want to skimp on it but if its not nessary id like to save the money. I want to get 7-10 years ot of it. What are your opinions?

    -Matt
     
  2. Tungsten
    Joined: Nov 2011
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    Tungsten Senior Member

    My first boat was built from interior Baltic birch ply 9'x42" floor, 3/8 bottom and 1/4 sides.Learned alot about glass and epoxy.Gave it a coat of oil paint.Sold it about 2 years ago now,i talk to the fellow every year since and all is well.
     
  3. Florida_Skiffs
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    Florida_Skiffs Junior Member

    I would use simple exterior grade plywood (3/4inch bottom and 1/2inch side)and cover with 12 oz cloth, then epoxy, how much expoxy do you think i should need and how many coats, 4.5 gallons enough? i would fill and blemishes with wood putty
     
  4. boatbuilder41
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    boatbuilder41 Senior Member

    My experiance glassing both sides is one little pin hole and the boat gets water logged. It can never dry outcausing premature rot
     
  5. Florida_Skiffs
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    Florida_Skiffs Junior Member

    Does pressure treated pine work?
     
  6. boatbuilder41
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    boatbuilder41 Senior Member

    Marine plywood alone is good for ten years. How big of boat are you building?
     
  7. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    I'm not sure how big a project you're building, but your scantlings are way over the top.

    3/4" plywood on the bottom can offer some protection, but for strength 1/2" is all you need. The sides can be 3/8" and you can get away with 1/4" if lightness is desired (it usually is).

    There's absolutely no reason to use a combi mat product (1208) on this type of build. You'll just waste resin for zero gain. 1208 is a 12 ounce biax fabric, lightly stitched to an 8 ounce mat. The mat is for use in polyester and vinylester laminates, to improve elongation properties and isn't necessary with epoxy laminates. A single layer of 12 ounce biax will not offer any significant strength or stiffness on 1/2" or 3/4" plywood planking. If you do use it, you'll just add unnecessary weight and make fairing a lot harder.

    Using light layers of fabric on plywood boats is to help waterproof and improve abrasion resistance. In this regard, you can use 6 ounce cloth, set in epoxy, with 1/4 or less the epoxy needed for 1208.

    Are you building the Old Warf, Lumber Yard Skiff? Which version?
     
  8. Florida_Skiffs
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    Florida_Skiffs Junior Member

    The lumber yard skiff 16 but I may modify it to be a semi v. I was wanting 3/4inch on the bottom for extra stiffness when pounding into waves, but you think 1/2inch will suffice?
     
  9. Submarine Tom

    Submarine Tom Previous Member

    I never have and never will waste my money on "marine grade plywood".
     
  10. boatbuilder41
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    boatbuilder41 Senior Member

    Gluv-it .skip the glass if you feel you can make waterproof seams. Avoid standing water inside when not in use. Avoid oak leaves in boat.if covered when stored ,uncover often to prevent mildew inside.i used plywood boats for commercial use for many years. They are great when properly cared for
     
  11. boatbuilder41
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    boatbuilder41 Senior Member

    I agree with tom. Its just a matter of opinion. None of my plywood hoats were marine grade
     
  12. Florida_Skiffs
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    Florida_Skiffs Junior Member

    I live on the water, saltwater, i can either bottom paint it or lift it out of the water when not in use with my davit. So would normal pressure treated exterior pine work? And should i only glass one side? Just epoxy the inside? Just epoxy each side and glass the seams? ASking all my questions while i can
     
  13. boatbuilder41
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    boatbuilder41 Senior Member

    Dont rely on any resin sticking to pressure treated wood for very long. And careful to avoid plywood without exterior glue between layers, like luan.
     
  14. boatbuilder41
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    boatbuilder41 Senior Member

    Total difference in salt water and fresh.........
    fresh water will rot wood much faster
     

  15. Florida_Skiffs
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    Florida_Skiffs Junior Member

    Alright so no to pressure treated.
     
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