NEwb

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by girvin, May 28, 2010.

  1. girvin
    Joined: Dec 2009
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    Location: Vancouver Island

    girvin Junior Member

    Hi so I was wondering how to get started in designing boats. I am not sure if I would want to go to back to school for naval arch but would like to get my feet wet. I about to build a 16 ft aluminum planning hull and just was wondering if I could of designed it. I am also very interested in full displacement passagemakers. So maybe not a career but would love to do some designs.
     
  2. hoytedow
    Joined: Sep 2009
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    Location: Quam prospectum!

    hoytedow Fly on the Wall - Miss ddt yet?

    A prospective employer would ask, "What are your qualifications?" Do you have any related experience such as design work, carpentry, metalwork, machining, electronics or other?
     
  3. marshmat
    Joined: Apr 2005
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    Location: Ontario

    marshmat Senior Member

    Hi Girvin,

    The first thing I have to ask is: What do you like doing?

    If your main interest is to get out on the water, you might find design work to be pretty tedious. Simply buying a boat is usually the better way to go in this case.

    If you like the idea of building a boat and having it reflect your needs and desires, a custom design from a professional designer can be just as economical (or more so) than buying a new production boat. You get input at every stage- the design is what you want it to be- but the hard part of the work (drawings, calculations, balancing various trade-offs to suit your needs) is done by the hired expert.

    Only if the design process itself appeals to you, would I suggest learning to do it on your own. There's a great deal of theoretical background to learn in order to understand how it all works- even an avid reader with an engineering background will take a few years to get up to speed. Of course, theory isn't much use without the knowledge of how it all comes together in practice, so you end up spending a lot of your spare time cruising on as many boats as you can, poking around boatyards, and reading through designers' and sailors' blogs and books to see how various ideas have worked out in the real world. When you actually get down to the design process, you'll probably find that time spent checking calculations and detailing drawings will outweigh time spent dreaming up new ideas. If you try to make a full-time business out of it, you'll have clients, marketing and cash flow to worry about.

    There are a few people (most of whom are at least a bit nuts- I can say that because I'm one of them) who enjoy this last option. If this is you (and if you have sufficient background- engineering training, boatbuilding / carpentry / metalworking experience, lots of time spent boating and working on your boat, etc.) start by reading lots of naval architecture and yacht design textbooks. Get out on other boats as often as you can. Go to school (or a distance learning program), if you're so inclined. Don't try to computerize anything until you fully understand it (a common and dangerous Big Mistake is to say "I have CAD software, therefore I can design boats"). Start small; you'll have much more luck starting with a 16' fishing boat than if you try to jump right in with a 40' trawler.
     
  4. girvin
    Joined: Dec 2009
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    Location: Vancouver Island

    girvin Junior Member

    Yes, I am a yacht delivery captain and have been on a many boats, Did the refit on my pahi 42, have done cabinetry and am very proficient in welding stick mig and tig. I also own a small surfboard label and shape glass and sand myself. I went to school for industial Design but ran out of funds. I have always enjoyed engineering and have a little experience. I have only used a CAD software designed for surfboards so I am going to take a class. I also installed electronics and systems for work when we cruised. I am not trying to make a living or even money it just seems like a fun trade and would love to design my next boat. I am more looking for info on hull shaped and righting just pretty basic stuff. I want to design a 60ft full displacement hull for us to cruise on and explore surf spots. I can see it in my head but don't know how to put it in functioning #s and on paper. I like the bruehler goose look. Very simple and workboat like but I want a narrow beam and more efficient hull. If I had the money I would get a dashew's
     
  5. girvin
    Joined: Dec 2009
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    Location: Vancouver Island

    girvin Junior Member

    Thanks Marshmat maybe I will just read some book for fun the hire someone to help me with my idea someday. Any books that will halp out with the basics?
     
  6. girvin
    Joined: Dec 2009
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    Location: Vancouver Island

    girvin Junior Member

    I might just like drawing pretty pictures LOL thats the ID guy in me.
     
  7. marshmat
    Joined: Apr 2005
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    Location: Ontario

    marshmat Senior Member

    So would I, but very few of us have the requisite mid-seven-figures net worth.

    Larsson/Eliasson "Principles of Yacht Design" is one of my favourites.... it covers all the main principles and engineering concepts involved in the design of a typical cruising boat. Of course, I can think of quite a few others that I have and like, and probably two dozen more I'd love to add to the bookshelf.....
     

  8. girvin
    Joined: Dec 2009
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    Location: Vancouver Island

    girvin Junior Member

    Thanks !
     
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