New yacht - what to buy

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by Tantalus, Jan 30, 2011.

  1. Tantalus
    Joined: Mar 2010
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    Location: Auckland, New Zealand

    Tantalus 1963 kauri cruiser

    We've decided to sell our launch and get back into sailing. I need help deciding on what to get. Am looking at a new Bavaria 32; Jeanneau 33i; Beneteau 32; Hanse 32 & the HUnter 33.
    Important criteria for us:
    furling main & jib, auto helm, electric anchoring, head room, reasonable size bed, hot water, spray dodger, bimini, price. Along with the essential sailing abilities - obviously.
    Any thoughts/ suggestions please?
     
  2. Landlubber
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    Landlubber Senior Member

    ...buy used and save thousands mate, everyone around you is going broke, so now is not the time to waste good money on a new (with way too many people adding profits) boat.
     
  3. Tantalus
    Joined: Mar 2010
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    Tantalus 1963 kauri cruiser

    Hmmm. I hear you. My last 6 boats were all 2nd hand. New is nice!!! Plus, if you look after it, it you get your money back. There's a 2005 model Bavaria for sale here now at the same price as a brand new one! Go figure?
     
  4. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    I dont know prices .

    Bavaria is little more than a disposable kitchen appliance. Ive always had a good impression of French production build standards and style.
    I was recently on a Hanse.. 50 footer new....the construction details look good , the design was professional Judel Vrolik., but the style was stark..all square corners...looked like an IKEA flat pack interior with a snub nosed bow requiring a fold out anchor contraption.

    As Landlubber stated...its a buyers market these days...you should be able to purchase an already fit out, higher class production boat like an X Yacht for the same money as a Beneteau .

    Drive a hard bargain.

    And remember some of the Race boat classes, like the Farr 30, are being replaced by a new class. Top boats with top gear are going cheap. Speak with a good yacht broker and have cash in hand.
     
  5. Tantalus
    Joined: Mar 2010
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    Tantalus 1963 kauri cruiser

    Good advice, thanks. Although I want good sailing abilities, I will mostly cruise, not race.
     
  6. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    The advantage to a race boat is that the equipment level and build specs are always high. of course there is some compromise with deck layout and interior volume. Low interior volume, complex deck layout and a deep keel are the prime reasons that older race boats sell cheap.

    Mumm 36
    http://www.yachtworld.com/boats/199...cing-Sloop-2071470/Bremerton/WA/United-States

    and a Mumm 30

    http://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1997/Mumm-30-2286898/Barcelona/Spain


    Ill bet you could knock ten grand off those prices and walk away with a nice boat.

    of course New Zealand is a different region...there might not be so many boats desperate for new owners.
     
  7. Landlubber
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    Landlubber Senior Member

    Tantalus, have a look on Google in the USA, money is very short there and boats for sale a plenty, buy overseas, sail for as long as you want to and forget duty unless you wish to take her home.
    You are in a seriously good position to buy, be ruthless and you will save a lot, go in for half of what they are asking and chances are it will still be yours, there is VERY little real cash about and plenty of people loosing their homes will gladly get rid of the boat to save the home or business......take advantage if the situation while you too can do so, it will only be a limited time that you have cash to spare too, as the world is changing rapidly, buying a good quality live sea aboard boat is a good investment.
     
  8. Landlubber
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    Landlubber Senior Member

    ...also remember, the new boat will require a considerable amount of cash to get it ready to cruise the world, about 20 to 50K.....
     
  9. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

  10. Tantalus
    Joined: Mar 2010
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    Tantalus 1963 kauri cruiser

    98k US & tax & duty & delivery & exchange rate @ around .77 - all for a boat launched in 1987? I don't think so!
     
  11. Tantalus
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    Tantalus 1963 kauri cruiser

    Or 1989?
     
  12. Tantalus
    Joined: Mar 2010
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    Tantalus 1963 kauri cruiser

    Another question: main sail furling - in-mast or in-boom? What is best and why?
     
  13. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    In boom furling is a pain in the ***. Ive sailed a few hundred thousand miles with the stuff and wouldn't touch it for my own boat. Torn luff tapes and blown out battens cost big money to repair and will constantly plague you. . When the sail is rolled you cant perform simple maitence like new tell tales or batten tension, the sail gets wet on the mandrel and molds or corrodes the mandrel, leech lines are difficult to arrange and use...........................

    In mast is more reliable and easier to use.

    Both rely on buttons and electro gizmos to work.

    Nothing wrong with a well thought out conventional slab reefing system on a small boat.

    If I had money to waste on electro gizmos it would be a pair of electric winch's. They are very versatile..lifting a man aloft...hauling kedge anchors, lifting tenders, sheeting sails, rolling the genoa, hoisting sails..........


    Oh and Id say that swan 36 is stuck in Antigua...subtract 15 grand right away. Also look for yacht stuck in Hawaii.


    Luff tape damage at radar height
     

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  14. Crag Cay
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    Crag Cay Senior Member

    In Boom furling is brilliant. Just requires some simple understanding and care and then it's hassle free.

    I've sailed for years with a very early version of the Danish Sailtainer and it's so easy on a 36ft boat. No electrics or anything complicated - and there is no comparison between the ease of use of boom furling and slap reefing (even with batt cars, Dutchmen systems, etc, etc). The latest developments (especially Schaefer and Leisure Furl) are even better.

    Boom furling also gives you a proper fully battened, full roach mainsail.

    I always think boom furling is a bit like windvanes; there's countless people who will tell you that windvanes can't do this, or you will have problems with that, and that an autopilot is so much simpler. But 30 years on, my Monitor self steering together with the In-boom reefing and have proved that (in the right hands), they are amongst the best features on the boat I sail.
     
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  15. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    Full battened full roach leach mainsails are nice but overrated on a cruising boat.


    How does your mainsail handle batten compression load at the luff tape batten pocket interface ? Something new ? When you jibe the mainsail huge load is transmitted from batten to pocket at the luff as it snaps from port to stb jibe.
    Motoring with a full main in a seaway will destroy the luff pockets as the main slats back and forth and the compression cannot be transferred into a batten car luff track .

    Do you have leach line run down the luff..if so how does the roller compensate for this leach line purchase and jammer BUMP in the rolled luff stack diameter ? and keep halyard tension from crushing it on the boom ? If the leach line increases the roll diameter you have a short tight luff and a long loose leach. A Roller boom must stack the sail evenly leach and luff.

    I must put a man in a chair and hoist to the leach to tension . Not fun at night with the third reef.

    How do you control mold formation from a wet horizontally furled main in the boom ? My sail looks old after a year.

    How do you control chafe on the reefed main leach and luff as it saws on the side of the boom when you work, reefed, to windward in a seaway ?

    How do you reef and " Boom Up" to keep the boom end from dragging thru the back of waves ? Ive never met a system that allows you to alter the geometry of boom height to suite sea conditions.

    How do you set the storm tri ? Do you carry a separate track ?

    And I can assure you that when something goes wrong with the boom furler and you must drop, at sea, the uncontrolled luff mainsail with full battens on deck, that you have a science project on you hands. The last time I had to cut the carbon battens in half with an angle grinder and remove in two pieces to control the loose main on deck. Expensive day and the next 2 thousand miles without a mainsail.

    You wont sell me one. The whole system is an expensive lightweight steamroller marketed to folks who dont know how to correctly pull in a slab reef.
     
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