New with many questions and ideas.

Discussion in 'Projects & Proposals' started by Tanto_Mo, Mar 25, 2020.

  1. Tanto_Mo
    Joined: Mar 2020
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    Location: Missouri

    Tanto_Mo Junior Member

    Trying to get a feel for what is need in an entire build for a boat to traverse the world and back. I am not a sailor by any stretch of the imagination. There are sailors and fisherman in my family but I have spent much of my life inland, namely Missouri. I have no experience towards ship design or operation, with that said I am looking for collaboration in a concept, and design.

    A few questions I have for anyone interested are:
    1) would any of you be interested in collaborating with me in a budget design?
    2) how come sails are so massive in the center versus two smaller sails on the sides [front and aft or left and right] or even masts that can be collapsed for storms?
    3) what are some big considerations to have for actually being seaworthy for both the vessel and myself?

    I know much of these are likely to be obvious to many of you here, I also realize that research is a big part of the journey however, I am unsure of what is valuable to not only to myself but; in general not going to be misleading.
    The purpose of this post to clarify, is to learn and connect through this forum. As well as to ensure quality information dissemination.

    I really look forward to your responses.
     
  2. kapnD
    Joined: Jan 2003
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    Location: hawaii, usa

    kapnD Senior Member

    Read books by Dave Gerr, Ted Brewer and others to try and get your head around the subject of boats.
    Google up info on trans oceanic sailing, and search Amazon for books about others who’ve done that.
    A good start point for your project is to develop a “SOR”, a statement of requirements.
    Develop a budget and some specific ideas, then post them here for discussion.
     
  3. Tanto_Mo
    Joined: Mar 2020
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    Location: Missouri

    Tanto_Mo Junior Member

    What are you meaning with the SOR (statement of requirements)? When I searched it, I couldn't find more than Clean title templates for boats or project proposals for properties. Was that what you were pointing to or was there a different direction you're trying to guide me in?
    Thanks for getting back kapnD
     
  4. fallguy
    Joined: Dec 2016
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    fallguy Senior Member

    The SOR is a comprehensive listing of the needs of the vessel. For example, you want
    -bluewater capable
    -long passage capable
    -low cost, although there is no such thing in a build
    -staterooms?
    All other details you need and want.

    The idea you would design is foolish. So don't consider it unless you have a few million bux to lose on a bad design.

    The best way to get a boat like you wish on a budget is to purchase a used one. The costs to build in time and money are really daunting.

    $3000 a foot would be doing well, so a 50 footer coming in at $150k would be considered budget by all standards I'd say...you could probably find a capable used vessel for 1/3rd to 1/2 of that... I might get laughed at for presenting such wild numbers, probably the $3k a foot is rather low really...
     
  5. Tanto_Mo
    Joined: Mar 2020
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    Location: Missouri

    Tanto_Mo Junior Member

    Thank you for the useful tips and starting points fallguy, I had an impression that is what was meant but clarity is better than guess work any day. While I have no disagreement with your later comments, I am adamant in this process. If it's laughable then I can accept that, visionaries are generally crazy until they succeed. With that said I will, keep all the great information that's provided with high regards.
     
  6. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    What process are you adamant about? The questions you post are really basic. That means you are very far from having the knowledge to start a design, budget or otherwise. To start with, define budget. You are dealing largely with engineers, and we are adamant about putting precise numbers and dimensions to designs.
     
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  7. Tanto_Mo
    Joined: Mar 2020
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    Location: Missouri

    Tanto_Mo Junior Member

    Again I realize these are basic questions, I am adamant about the whole process in general, more specifically I would say actually making a stable, comfortable, and relatively low cost boat. I prefer function over form; it's important to not waist money, time, and effort on something that just looks cool. I have been going over research about materials and their application in the marine industry mostly. Currently I am working on defining the parts that you and the others have laid out. It's not hard to grasp the information that has been provided so far as well as other information that I can find, just sorting through it is a relatively long process of course. Working with engineers isn't foreign to me however, the original budget, to answer the largest question so far. I would like to keep it under $250,000. So far I have not been satisfied with used boats for that price or less.
    If there is information you'd like to direct me to I would happily dive in. Currently waiting to purchase the books suggested.

    Thanks for the reply gonzo.
     
  8. Tanto_Mo
    Joined: Mar 2020
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    Location: Missouri

    Tanto_Mo Junior Member

    To caveat to some of my basic questions, I have been searching for those answers to the basic questions and am yet to get anywhere. I must just be looking in the wrong places.
     
  9. Rumars
    Joined: Mar 2013
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    Rumars Senior Member

    Tanto what exactly are your questions? The ones about boat design I mean.

    There are enough boats, used and new, in the up to 250 000$ to get anyone safely and confortably around the planet. You only have to play some youtube to see it done. That budget only becomes insufficient if you are looking for particularly large boats, but even in that category there are bargains to be found. If the current designs do not satisfy you tell us why. What's wrong with them in your opinion?

    Please tell us at least what size boat you envision, better yet also how many crew, what regions to be sailed, etc.
     
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  10. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    For example, I have cruised extensively on what many considered small boats. I find them easy to handle. The last longish cruise was from Milwaukee, through the Mississippi to Colombia on a 25 footer.
     
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  11. fallguy
    Joined: Dec 2016
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    fallguy Senior Member

    Building a proven design is difficult.

    Designing and building a prototype is extremely difficult.

    Read up on diesel ducks. The designer has passed, but the design may be his crowning achievement. Of course, you are limited to hull speed on displacement hulls. A catamaran will take you places far faster.
     
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  12. bajansailor
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    bajansailor Marine Surveyor

    Tanto Mo, please do listen to all the good advice given above.
    If you want to build a boat, ok, buy a set of stock plans and have a bash at it. The odds are very good that you will never finish it. Can you see yourself working on the boat every day for the next 5 - 10 years?
    If you want to see the world, buy an existing boat.
    Do an 'advanced' search on Yachtworld - www.yachtworld.com - and type in as many constraints as you like re size, type, cost, location etc.
    And see what 'comes up'.
    If you like it, buy it and go sailing.
    You wouldn't want to build a car from scratch if you can buy one second hand or even new for less than the cost of building one, would you?
     
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  13. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    To answer the OP original question. What you need is to be a sailor. Sailors have gone around the world on boats that were not ideal but current standards. I like boats that have the least amount of stuff. They are simple and do the job. For less than $10,000 you can buy an adequate boat to go sailing. For all you know it will make you so seasick that your sailing career won't last more than one morning.
     
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  14. missinginaction
    Joined: Aug 2007
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    missinginaction Senior Member

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