new trends in tugboats

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by jclew, Mar 10, 2011.

  1. jclew
    Joined: Feb 2011
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    jclew New Member

    Would anyone be so kind as to share some views on new trends on tugboats for both ocean and harbour duty? thanks!
     
  2. BayouDude
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    BayouDude Junior Member

    For harbor duty high horsepower, z-drives and FiFi capability to go after LNG contracts. As far as offshore tugs there hasn't been much change in the gulf market other than open sterns with rollers for fleeting anchors.
     
  3. daiquiri
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    Location: Italy (Garda Lake) and Croatia (Istria)

    daiquiri Engineering and Design

    Last edited: Mar 10, 2011
  4. jclew
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    jclew New Member

    Thanks, BayouDude. Do you know what tug operators look for particularly when selecting designs?
     
  5. jclew
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    jclew New Member

    Thanks, daiquiri. This is indeed interesting. Do you know how many vessels have been fitted with this to-date?
     
  6. daiquiri
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    Location: Italy (Garda Lake) and Croatia (Istria)

    daiquiri Engineering and Design

  7. BayouDude
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    BayouDude Junior Member

    jclew

    When most operators come to us for design they pretty much know the boat they want. If they don't have a particular hull in mind they at least know what the boat must do ;most of the time because the boat is being built for a particular contract. Some need eye level for pushing barges inland, others need high horsepower and fuel range for rig moves. etc. As a designer it would be a good idea to have at least one boat of each type that can be tweaked for the particular application. For a harbor tug you will need a wide beam and deep hull to keep the vcg down. You looking to sell your own design or doing this for a class project?
     
  8. jclew
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    jclew New Member

    I'm exploring tugs as a design project, so I'm trying to find out what to incorporate on my design. Much appreciate everyone's advice!
     
  9. HReeve
    Joined: Dec 2009
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    HReeve Junior Member

    Well, as was mentioned, there are a ton of different types of tugs out there, depending on what you application is. You need to decide what you are going to design the vessel to do, then go from there.

    If you go to some websites for firms that design tugs, you'll see the wide variety of designs, from Ocean Going / Anchor Handling & Supply, to Escort, to docking assist, to ATB, to.... And within each category, there are a variety of ways to skin a cat.

    Take a look at www.RAL.ca and look under the designs tab for a sample of what's out there.
     
  10. Submarine Tom

    Submarine Tom Previous Member

    jclew,

    The thing to do is figure out what you need the tug to do first and to prioritise what you expect in the way of performance in each area. Then, what do you need in the tugs construction to allow for each function and expectation to be met.

    -Tom
     

  11. keysdisease
    Joined: Mar 2006
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    keysdisease Senior Member

    The Ship Docking Module concept isn't new, maybe 10 years old, probably older but so am I. The first one operated here in Ft Lauderdale, I think the Broward. It's a Z drive with a few twists.

    http://www.seabulktowing.com/assets/pdfs/sdm_broch_linear_020909.pdf

    It really something to watch these pull up to a ship and just reverse ends, no backing and filling or even turning, they are always pointed in the right direction.

    Steve
     
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