New to restorartion

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by corkhopper, Sep 26, 2005.

  1. corkhopper
    Joined: Sep 2005
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    corkhopper Junior Member

    I am soon to purchase a 1935 26' Johnson & Jago built cockler, that in 60s was converted to a gentlemen's cruiser. I am completely new to wooden boat restoration. All my friends and family think I have gone a little crazy - maybe I have! She sits very well in the water and the deisel engine runs very smoothly, but cosmetically she needs plenty of TLC. She is mahoganny on oak and I wish to redeck her completely. Will this mean removing the existing decking or can I place new on top? For her new mooring I have to motor her from the Thames to Eastbourne. Will the fact that has been sitting in the Thames and her reintroduction to salt water effect the boat in any way?

    I thank you all in advance for your patience with a novice.
     
  2. dr.j
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    dr.j Junior Member

    Removing and replacing the old decking is usually the way to go if the decking is gone. I do not favour simply covering up old problems. If you have frame/beam problems,the complete re.and re. is required. One cannot tell unless one has seen it. Are you able to post photos? As cocerns moving from fresh to salt, you will require antifouling on the wetted surface to prevent marine growth and the infiltration of marine borers. I would prefer to keep my boat in freshwater because of the problems that accompany salt water moorage.
     
  3. Bergalia
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    Bergalia Senior Member

    New to restoration

    Out of interest Corkhopper, is she a 'real' working cockler - a Leigh, or Cornish Cockler... or just one of those fancy vessels modelled on cockler lines ?
    As dr.j suggests - a photo would be nice so we can establish what we are dealing with. You mention her conversion to a gentlemen's cruiser. How much conversion ? Genuine Crabbers had very little decking. Has the conversion added much - and if so is that what's giving you heartburn ?
    Again as dr.j hints - a good tickle of anti-fouling would be required when moving her to a salt-water berth. Expensive - but worthwhile. But where on the Thames are you. From memory it has a pretty high tidal reach, and some pretty nasty things (Londoners included ) can be found floating by.
    Put her on the hard - and work like buggery. Cover her bum in one session. Let the anti-foul at least get 'tacky' before putting her back in the water. Oh, and avoid using a TBT based coat (if it's still on offer). It'll kill everything within ten metres of your mooring.
    But a photo would be handier before giving serious restoration advice. :rolleyes:
     
  4. corkhopper
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    corkhopper Junior Member

    Hi Dr J & Bergalia,

    Thanks for all your advices.

    She was built as a working cockler in Leigh-on-Sea. Not sure the date she was converted. The deck seems sound as does all the boat. I am able to get my hands on some antique mahoganny wood strip which ideally I would like to lay on top of the original deck. As soon as she arrives I will be taking her out the water to complete antifouling.

    Thanks once again
     

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  5. Bergalia
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    Bergalia Senior Member

    New to restoration

    Yes, yes, Corkhopper. A Leigh Cockler - the classic lines are clear. Trust me, I'm envious. :(
    If you've got the timber, tools, time and confidence it would be well worthwile replacing the decking. Start at the piece abutting the tabernacle (a short straight plank - the 'key') and you'll get some idea of conditions below. Check for rot around the tabernacle - often a place for 'leakage' due to mast stretch.
    Keep each piece as a pattern for the new section.
    Check the beams and supports below for any sign of rot. Scrub them well and apply a touch of linseed oil.
    I've found it easier to replace decking from the outside (gunwhales) working inwards, on alternate sides as you go - left; right; left; right etc (unseamanlike language) until only the 'key' remains to be laid.
    Give a slight bevel to upper face of planking, and 'putty knife-blade' space between each successive plank to allow for motion stress, and caulking (old fashion pitch). Then take a couple of days rubbing down with 'holy-stone'.
    Time consuming... But that's what classic timber is all about. Good luck. Let's know how you go.
    ;)
     
  6. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Welcome to the madness.

    A quick look at your photo reveled some issues you'd be well advised to seek professional counsel on. You likely have stoved in frames and possibly some hogging going on with that hull. This was determined by the hollow seen along the deck scuppers and rub around the forward end of the cabin trunk.

    Again, you'd be well advised in finding a surveyor, familiar with this type of yacht and have her looked over. The new owner sees all the pretty varnish and not the hogged sheer. This particularly true with a person new to older wooden craft.

    The deck could be the lid to a can of worms, if your not prepared or armored for the battle. Get this yacht on the hard (well blocked and supported) and have her accessed right away.
     
  7. Bergalia
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    Bergalia Senior Member

    New to restoration

    Not sure I can agree with you Par. Though maybe your eyesight is better than mine. I took the 'hogging' to be dirt streaks - remember the Thames is a pretty grubby area. True there is a nasty 'join' where the previous 'restorer' has added a couple of ports near the bows (breaking a classic line). Even so your advice is sound. She should have a professional inspection - and then go up onto the hard. :rolleyes:
     
  8. corkhopper
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    corkhopper Junior Member

    Thanks PAR & Bergalia for your advices. The 'join' was not as noticeable in real life as in the pic and indeed the hull was also dirty. Lots of flotsam and jetsum (a polite phrase) was around the mooring. Regarding the hogging, which I have looked up in my copy of the invaluable 'The Sailor's World-Book' by Admiral W H Smyth (first published 1867), could it be teminal?

    I have agreed a price on her and I am a little concerned that I have taken on too much - even though I am prepared for the endless hours in the winter to get her ready for the spring. Unfortunately, it is a lttle too late to pull out of the deal, and besides I have rather fallen for her!

    Once she is on the hard, my father-in-law, a retired boat builder, is going to give her a once-over and advise me on how to proceed.

    Thanks once again for all your help - I will have to strenghthen my resolve. I will let you know how I get on.

    Regards
     
  9. Bergalia
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    Bergalia Senior Member

    New to restoration

    Take heart Corkhopper. At least one boat in our life is meant to break the heart. If you've really set your mind on her - then go for it. Even rebuilding from scratch proves a labour of love. If you haven't done so yet, go to the library and borrow (or steal) Joshua Slocum's 'Sailing Alone Around The World.' Now there's a man who started from the ground upwards.
    But good to know you have a handy father-in-law. (Father-in-laws should only be acquired if they can prove useful...)
    And just think, at the end of it you'll have a craft which you know more intimately than any other (wives excepted) creation. Every squeak, every sigh... you'll settle back on your bunk and say - "Ah yes, that'll be the.....' ;)
     
  10. corkhopper
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    corkhopper Junior Member

    Thanks Bergalia
     
  11. corkhopper
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    corkhopper Junior Member

    Just read a short bio on Joshua Slocum - facinating. So much so I have ordered his book on amazon (equivalent to 16 australian dollars inc. shipping) - absolute bargain! Thanks for the encouragement - I am so looking forward working on my boat and making her into a real beauty.
     
  12. Bergalia
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    Bergalia Senior Member

    Attached Files:


  13. Bergalia
    Joined: Aug 2005
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    Bergalia Senior Member

    new to restoration

    the above sites should read:
    freespace.virgin.net/james_fraser.marshall/endeavour/oldnews

    and:

    alberta-ck318.freeserve.co.uk/smacklist/smack

    for some reason or other the original message became garbled...:(
     
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