new to boats-is older boat ok?

Discussion in 'Powerboats' started by hannahsmom, May 3, 2005.

  1. marshmat
    Joined: Apr 2005
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    Location: Ontario

    marshmat Senior Member

    cyclops- 'fraid I'm no traveller, but everyone should pass on the devil's-advocate lesson to anyone who's buying anything- house, car, boat, whatever....
     
  2. woodboat
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Baltimore MD, USA

    woodboat Senior Member

    Were you the winner?
     
  3. hannahsmom
    Joined: May 2005
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    Location: santa cruz ca

    hannahsmom Junior Member

    yep. still recovering from the "what did we do" . Thanks to you all it's contingent on a surveyor; and our boat friend turned out to be friends with the owner's mechanic. Also we think we can get an immediate slip in moss landing- 25 mins away. so we get the mech. out to check the engine, give him 1000 deposit and truck it down to the harbor- spend a week before we can get a hull guy to check it out. then I will be here bragging on my salmon.
     
  4. woodboat
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Baltimore MD, USA

    woodboat Senior Member

    Well awesome, sounds like you got a good deal.
     
  5. mackid068
    Joined: Feb 2005
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    mackid068 Semi-Newbie Posts Often

    I'd start to worry, but that's just me. Again, have someone experienced look at the hull (fiberglass, I assume) for blisters and strength and have a mechanic do a runthrough of all primary systems: W/C, water, fuel, engine, steering, throttle etc.
    Buy some nice SOLAS Type I PFDs, a good set of flares (check out landfallnavigation.com) and 2 or so good inflatable PFDs for you and your husband to wear all the time on the boat. Get a Switlik RescuePod or something of that nature as well.
     
  6. marshmat
    Joined: Apr 2005
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    Location: Ontario

    marshmat Senior Member

    What mackid said.

    I'd add that if you're new to boating it's worthwile to take a short course in the basics.... something that covers colregs, navaids, weather, etc. as it will make you a lot more confident and a lot safer on the water.

    Happy boating!
     
  7. hannahsmom
    Joined: May 2005
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    Location: santa cruz ca

    hannahsmom Junior Member

    Thanks- So far we have found a basic boating course through the coast guard aux. that my husband will take this spring- than next fall I will take the long, detailed version. They also have a new boat check- nothing structural, just safety and info. Of course now my husband is looking for a truck to tow the boat- sigh... the money sink has started.
     

  8. mackid068
    Joined: Feb 2005
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    Location: CT, USA

    mackid068 Semi-Newbie Posts Often

    Truck...truck...fuel...costly...Take the course, it'll help. Also, read Ted Brewer's basic boat design guide. I forgot the exact title, but it is a boat design bible and it'll help you choose hull types and what not.
     
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