New swim platform for a 1973 Silverton Sedan

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by missinginaction, Jul 7, 2016.

  1. missinginaction
    Joined: Aug 2007
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    missinginaction Senior Member

    Back in the early spring I decided that a swim platform incorporating a small outboard kicker would be my final big project on my restoration of this good old boat.
    I'll post some photos below that show the boats original state, the building of the new platform and how she turned out.
    I constructed the platform from Philippine Mahogany. Two layers, planed down to 5/8 inch. The laminated wood was oriented 90 degrees to give the platform additional stiffness. All properly sealed (3 coats epoxy) and primed/painted and reinforced so as to withstand the forces applied by the outboard and the additional weight it has to carry.
    The inside of the transom was also reinforced with 1 inch thick MDO (again entombed with resin) and 17 ounce cloth between the hull and the ply and between the ply layers. I used COOSA Composite below the water line (not cheap but nice stuff to work with and light!
    Well, a picture is worth 1000 words they say so I'll let the photo's speak for themselves.

    Regards,

    MIA
     

    Attached Files:

    bajansailor likes this.
  2. 7228sedan
    Joined: Nov 2009
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    7228sedan Senior Member

    Nicely done! I'm bringing back a 72 Luhrs 28. I just installed a full transom teak/mahogany platform this past spring. Good call with the transom reinforcement... I probably should have done so myself. I ended up adding additional brackets with significant through bolt reinforcements. It's amazing how thin these transoms are.
     
  3. missinginaction
    Joined: Aug 2007
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    Location: New York

    missinginaction Senior Member

    Thanks for the compliment 7228. Good to see someone else saving one of these older boats from the landfill.

    Today was the first time I had the chance to put that little Yamaha T 9.9 kicker to the test. The New York Canal System publishes accurate mileage information so I decided to take a ride today and see how far 3 gallons of gas would take me.
    It took a short time to figure out how to run that Yamaha. I found that it could push me at 5 MPH in calm conditions. A head wind might slow me to 4.5, a tail wind might push me to 5.2.
    Occasionally I encountered a cross wind of maybe 10-15 MPH. This caused a problem because if I wasn't right on top of the steering, the wind would push me off course and the helm would respond very slowly or not at all. If I couldn't get back on course with the kicker, I'd start the main engine and run with both for a minute or two. Even at idle the main would quickly have me back on course.
    I ran 24.5 miles at an average speed of 5 MPH. I used my main engine for a few minutes on 3 occasions to make course adjustments and I used my main engine to pass through a couple of locks as it's easier to maneuver in tight quarters with the main.
    I still had about a quart left in my little red portable fuel tank when I docked at the end of the trip.
    That Yamaha delivered right around 8 miles per gallon. Yes, it was a leisurely trip but 25 miles or so on 3 gallons of fuel is quite economical.
    I won't run on that Yamaha all the time and certainly not in narrow channels or in windy conditions. But I can see myself running that kicker on a calm morning, when I'm in no particular rush.

    Regards,

    MIA
     
  4. 7228sedan
    Joined: Nov 2009
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    Location: New Jersey USA

    7228sedan Senior Member

    Very nice! I'm surprised that the little kicker moved it so well. What do you have for primary power?
     
  5. missinginaction
    Joined: Aug 2007
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    missinginaction Senior Member

    Just a small block Ford V-8, 302 CID. It's a v-drive boat, which takes a little getting used to when you're working on it as the engine is installed backwards, the flywheel and transmission faces forward. The engine sits in the back of the boat under the aft cockpit.
     
  6. 7228sedan
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    7228sedan Senior Member

    Oh believe me I know :) My 72 has a 454... it fills the engine compartment up pretty well compared to the original 318. What kind of numbers do you see performance wise with the 302? I get 13 knots at 3000 RPM with the tabs extended. I'll see 21 at full open. I burn 11 GPH or so at 3000. It's a slow ride but very stable and relatively efficient considering the mass.
     

  7. missinginaction
    Joined: Aug 2007
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    Location: New York

    missinginaction Senior Member

    I've never even bothered to open her up. I just use her as a 5-10 yacht. We have a 10 MPH speed limit almost everywhere around here. With marinas, yacht clubs and private docks there are a few places that people can go 45 but not many.
    Those old Silverton's were known to be slugs and Iknew that when I bought her. The plan was nice and easy. When I'm in a hurry I run her up to 2000 RPM and get about 8 MPH. Otherwise it's displacement speed.....
     
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