New Plywood Kayak

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by ChrisMacD, Mar 19, 2022.

  1. ChrisMacD
    Joined: Feb 2021
    Posts: 9
    Likes: 2, Points: 3
    Location: SW Florida

    ChrisMacD Junior Member

    After over a year of searching and looking and plans, debating which would be most suitable, I decided that I'm just not happy with anything available.
    So I decided to just design my own. I have absolutely no idea what I'm doing here and just went by what looks right.
    Its obviously not done yet. Still have to add a lot of details.
    I had made a post here some time ago looking for some help, but unfortunately that didn't go anywhere.

    This is what I came up with.

    17'x28"

    Let me know what you think.

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    Will Gilmore likes this.
  2. BlueBell
    Joined: May 2017
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    Location: Victoria BC Canada

    BlueBell . . . . .

    I think if you've looked for over a year and couldn't find a design you liked out of all the kayaks built and designed in one of the oldest boats in the world, then who cares what others think. Build it and add it to the list.
    All the best and post pictures of your build please.
    Cheers.
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2022
  3. messabout
    Joined: Jan 2006
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    Location: Lakeland Fl USA

    messabout Senior Member

    Do as Bluebell suggests, just build it.

    However your design has some limitations. First among them is that your kayak will probably have excessive wetted surface because of the bottom configuration. Wetted surface is a prime factor for almost any human powered vessel. Have you calculated that feature?

    The appearance is typical of a conventional kayak. The details could use a bit of tweaking however.
     
  4. Will Gilmore
    Joined: Aug 2017
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    Location: Littleton, nh

    Will Gilmore Senior Member

    I like the look of her. Please tell us what your thought process is? What were the elements you specifically were looking for that you couldn't find? What combinations were you wanting? What things were you finding that you didn't want?

    I would also like to see some construction plans, or are you just gluing plywood strips together?
     
  5. ChrisMacD
    Joined: Feb 2021
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    Location: SW Florida

    ChrisMacD Junior Member

    I have not done any calculations. Wouldn't even know where to start.
     
  6. Will Gilmore
    Joined: Aug 2017
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    Location: Littleton, nh

    Will Gilmore Senior Member

    Start with displacement. How much will the kayak weigh with/without load (paddler).

    Then you will have a better idea of how to locate the seat for the best trim. Where is the paddler's center of gravity and the boat's CE? How will she sit with seat farther aft or foreward.
     
  7. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    The dimensions are more a canoe than kayak. I don't know how much you weight, but a long kayak like you drew would usually have a beam of maybe 14-16 inches; just enough for your hips to fit in.
     
  8. Kayakmarathon
    Joined: Sep 2014
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    Location: NewEngland

    Kayakmarathon Junior Member

    I think I see hollows in the waterplane at the ends. This is a very common characteristic even among stitch and glue kits. I've spent over 20 years coming up with a math model and strategy to avoid this characteristic.
     
  9. Kayakmarathon
    Joined: Sep 2014
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    Location: NewEngland

    Kayakmarathon Junior Member

    A waterline beam of 14 to 16 inches is for experts / olympic training kayaks. A stable kayak for chop and large boat wake has a beam waterline of 18 to 20 inches and a max beam of 24 inches, elliptical.
     
    Skyak likes this.
  10. scotdomergue
    Joined: Jan 2009
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    Location: Twisp, WA USA

    scotdomergue Scot

    I suggest you start with Gilmore's questions. Knowing what you're trying to accomplish would make it much easier to provide relevant advice!

    I use Free!ship software (currently version 3.36+) which provides analysis, including the ability to compare weight, displacement, and speed vs. resistance for different hull design options.

    I find 2 chine hulls to be almost as efficient as more (eg. your 4-chine design), and they're easier to build.

    Will be happy to provide additional thoughts if/when I understand better what you want and why you created your design as it is.
     
  11. skyl4rk
    Joined: Aug 2006
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    Location: Lake Michigan

    skyl4rk Junior Member

    Nice looking boat. Apparently set up for a pedal drive system? If so, because your weight will be higher up in a self bailing canoe than in a normal canoe, you might want to make it a few inches wider for stability. The vee bottom will decrease stability but will add structural strength, I would keep the vee but increase beam under the waterline a bit. You might be OK as in your plan but I suspect it will be tender.
     
  12. Milehog
    Joined: Aug 2006
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    Location: NW

    Milehog Clever Quip

    Why so much volume? Are you hauling a heavy load? A 28" beam is more appropriate for a double kayak. The boat will be sluggish and will not respond to leaned turns. 22" is pretty much the max beam for a traditional single person kayak with acceptable performance. If you are a large person maybe 24".
    If you are concerned about tipping, then you need to take lessons.
    Trust me, there is a reason you don't see 'kayaks' like that one.
     
    BlueBell likes this.
  13. AlanX
    Joined: Mar 2022
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    Location: Perth, Western Australia

    AlanX Senior Member

    I built a home designed/made paddle canoe that was about 15 foot long and 22 inch wide at the water line.
    As it was flat bottom, I had to wedge myself in the centre with my knees to stay stable.
    Otherwise it the canoe was okay.
    If I was doing it again I would have a shallow V bottom to help centralise my position.
    I would also "pad" the insides to reduce knee strain.
    Don't make the sides too high, it can interfere with the paddle.

    If this helps, regards AlanX
     
  14. ChrisMacD
    Joined: Feb 2021
    Posts: 9
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    Location: SW Florida

    ChrisMacD Junior Member

    Yes, it's will have a pedal drive. Got a pelican drive unit for a really good price on ebay.
    It is actually not much higher than my current Ocean Kayak Trident 13 (within an inch) and I don't have any stability problems with it.
    Beam has already been reduced to 26". As to a heavy load, I'm 6'4" and almost 200 pounds. There will be a live well behind the seat in the tank well and I plan on catching some decent sized fish that will be stored in the front.
    What kind of lessons? I don't have any problems in my current kayak.
    At 26" wide, it's only an inch or two wider than some commercially produced boats. There are plans available for a 15'x32" plywood kayak that have been built.
     

  15. Milehog
    Joined: Aug 2006
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    Location: NW

    Milehog Clever Quip

    A live well? I understand now!
     
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