New pilot house skiff design

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by CaptChap, Aug 26, 2022.

  1. CaptChap
    Joined: Aug 2022
    Posts: 11
    Likes: 6, Points: 3
    Location: Jonesport, ME

    CaptChap Junior Member

    Here is a little skiff project that I'm building. Getting ready to flip the hull and star on the house.
    Comments?
     

    Attached Files:

  2. bajansailor
    Joined: Oct 2007
    Posts: 3,012
    Likes: 1,170, Points: 113, Legacy Rep: 37
    Location: Barbados

    bajansailor Marine Surveyor

    Welcome to the Forum Captain.
    The drawings of your 18' skiff look very neat - do you have any photos that you can post showing your construction progress so far?
    I tried googling the Bar Island 18, but I did not get anywhere (such as a website about them) - and they don't even appear to have a Facebook page.
    Have you been supplied with stability information with the plans that you bought?
    She seems to be fairly beamy, with the beam carried well aft, but it would still be interesting to see what sort of stability data she has, and the effect of two heavy crew members sitting in the seats in the pilothouse will raise the centre of gravity a bit.
     
  3. CaptChap
    Joined: Aug 2022
    Posts: 11
    Likes: 6, Points: 3
    Location: Jonesport, ME

    CaptChap Junior Member


    Hello BajanSailor -
    Thank you for your kind comments about my design. First, you won't find anything online about "Bar Island Boats"; it is just the name of my little shop up in Jonesport Maine, which is really my small garage/shop/design loft (LOL). My place sits directly on Chandler Bay, overlooking picturesque Bar Island.
    I have spent most of my life designing, repairing, building, and sailing boats of all sizes and types. This little project is just a retirement exercise to keep me busy (and broke), in my old age.
    I actually modified Walter Baron's very successful "Lumberyard Skiff" design, and somewhat followed his construction technique. I highly reccommend purchasing his little booklet, which really helps anyone starting out in simple plywood skiff construction. Another design commentator ("SkiffMan" a senior member on Wooden Boat Forum) kindly estimated the stability data, based on my design parameters, as follows (his quote):
    "At 2200# I am calculating a metacentric height GM of about 54". GM for decent motion in rough water: 24" for the largest powercraft, 60" for the smallest powercraft. Too high GM gives too fast a motion to stand and work or fish, and too low does not give enough responsiveness to the waves for good seakeeping.... I calculated your nominal cruise speed using 30hp to be about 16 knots. So with S/L ratio of 3.93, your CG would be best at 61.2% of the at-rest waterline from the bow."
    I calculated the displacement numbers for my boat to be as follows:
    ESTIMATED DISPLACEMENT IMMERSION DATA
    WL DEPTH (IN) (FT) VOLUME (CU.FT.) WEIGHT (LB.)
    5.0 0.417 28.5 1823
    5.5 0.458 31.3 2005
    6.0 0.5 34.2 2188
    6.5 0.542 37.0 2370
    7.0 0.583 39.9 2552

    I estimate my final loaded displacement (w/50 hp outboard, 3 crew, fuel, etc.) to be around 2200 lbs.
    I am currently finishing prepping the bottom & topsides for painting before I flip the hull over, then I'll start the interior & pilothouse.
    Thanks for your comments & questions...keep 'em coming!
     

    Attached Files:

    bajansailor likes this.

  4. CaptChap
    Joined: Aug 2022
    Posts: 11
    Likes: 6, Points: 3
    Location: Jonesport, ME

    CaptChap Junior Member

    Sorry for the bad formatting in my previous reply ... here is my displacement/immersion depth table.
    upload_2022-8-27_10-27-17.png
     

    Attached Files:

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