new member (would like to build the SOF rowing wherry Ruth)

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by whosail, Nov 12, 2014.

  1. whosail
    Joined: Nov 2014
    Posts: 10
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Henderson,NV

    whosail Junior Member

    Thank you G. Gentlemen I am a brand new user from the desert of Nevada. I would like to build the SOF rowing wherry Ruth and probably will call on you for help. I am 79 years old, built a St Pier Dory in the early seventies and rebuilt a 32 ft Monterey fish boat in the early eighties both with the help of knowledgeable shipwrights. A span of 30 plus years. This will be a brand new project but I have been out of touch for many years and will need help. Hope I can count on some of you for that help.

    Dave
     
  2. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
    Posts: 13,570
    Likes: 375, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 2031
    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    Congratulations on you project, and welcome to the forum.
     
  3. messabout
    Joined: Jan 2006
    Posts: 2,980
    Likes: 187, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 1279
    Location: Lakeland Fl USA

    messabout Senior Member

    You can, indeed, count on some of our knowledgeable members for help if you need it.

    Welcome to the forum.
     
  4. Petros
    Joined: Oct 2007
    Posts: 2,936
    Likes: 139, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 1593
    Location: Arlington, WA-USA

    Petros Senior Member

    welcome to the forum!

    I have built about a dozen SOF kayaks and a number of small sailing dingys also using SOF construction of my own design. Nothing to be intimidated about, it is one of the fastest methods and easiest to learn I think of all construction methods. Many here will be happy to help you along your way.

    Nothing from stopping you to get started right away.
     
  5. whosail
    Joined: Nov 2014
    Posts: 10
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Henderson,NV

    whosail Junior Member

    Lost my message! Thanks for your response. First order of building will be to locate wood.

    Being in Southern Nevada it may be difficult.

    Dave
     
  6. Petros
    Joined: Oct 2007
    Posts: 2,936
    Likes: 139, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 1593
    Location: Arlington, WA-USA

    Petros Senior Member

    you can buy suitable wood from any lumber yard, but you will have to pick through the pile of larger lumber to find the clear pieces. Than you rip them down with a table saw to the size you need, or a bit larger and sand or plane them smooth. often the lumber yard will cut it into smaller stringers for a reasonable fee if you do not have a table saw.

    You can make a good circular saw into a suitable table saw by getting a very good quality narrow curf blade and than screwing it to the bottom of work bench with a plywood top that has a slot cut into it.

    I have used doug fir, western red cedar, alaskan yellow cedar (if you can find it), and spruce that I bought from a big box store lumber yard. often I have to work my way down through the pile to get some fairly clear pieces. They do not have to be perfect, just have enough if it clear so you can get some full length stringers without defects or grain runout. It is a really inexpensive way to make your own boat lumber, but it takes some effort.
     
  7. whosail
    Joined: Nov 2014
    Posts: 10
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Henderson,NV

    whosail Junior Member

    Thanks Petros. I have located Marine plywood at $70.00 a sheet (4x8). the only cedar I have located were fencing material will probably have to go with fir and as u advise pick it carefully

    Dave
     
  8. NoEyeDeer
    Joined: Jun 2010
    Posts: 982
    Likes: 30, Points: 28, Legacy Rep: 300
    Location: Australia

    NoEyeDeer Senior Member

    If you can only get fir, and you're fussy about weight, you could use slightly thinner stringers. IIRC they're sized at 3/4" thick, and are fine at that size in western red cedar. Douglas fir has a modulus of elasticity around 50% greater than WRC, so for an equivalent stiffness you could plane them down to 21/32".

    This would drop the weight by 14%, and would make the stringers easier to twist into position, while leaving the overall stiffness the same. Strength would be greater than WRC at 3/4". They'd still be substantially heavier than WRC stringers though.

    You could also change the width, but optimising that way, while potentially better for weight, would make building a bit more difficult.
     
  9. lewisboats
    Joined: Oct 2002
    Posts: 2,329
    Likes: 126, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 1603
    Location: Iowa

    lewisboats Obsessed Member

    Dave uses fencing material... Make sure you soak everything. Getting the twists and bends to stick without it cracking is a pain. I currently have an Annabelle under construction in my dining room, however... the bends on the Ruth aren't quite so dramatic as it is considerably longer.
     
  10. whosail
    Joined: Nov 2014
    Posts: 10
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Henderson,NV

    whosail Junior Member

    Thanks Steve I will see what I can find. May have to go with a CVG fir for the stringers,etc if I can't get the length.

    I wrote a response a few minutes ago, but lost the screen. Hope you don't get this twice.

    Dave
     
  11. upchurchmr
    Joined: Feb 2011
    Posts: 2,866
    Likes: 89, Points: 48, Legacy Rep: 579
    Location: Ft. Worth, Tx, USA

    upchurchmr Senior Member

    Are you able to get to a Home Depot or Lowes?

    They both (locally) have WRS. You probably will have to splice the stringers to get full length, I regularly get 8, 10, and sometimes 12' boards for 15' kayaks, so everything has to be spliced.

    Best to do a 8/1 splice or longer and use a boat building epoxy.
    I personally use West system, mostly because that is what I started with.
    The splice joint will break in the wood if you take just a little care.

    Actually, here in Texas, it wouldn't matter if I used Fir, I would most likely have to splice anyway.

    It does take a good bit of time picking thru the entire wood pile to find enough useful wood. You really don't want any knots in the finished stringer. Most of the time I go back to the store multiple times to get enough for one project.

    I hope you actually have such stores, reasonably in reach.

    Good luck.

    PS. to get the curve Dave specifies for the Gunwale I personally would laminate two thinner boards in the specified curve. One person had the full sized wood "relax" closer to straight and had to add shims to the keel, etc to get the proper shape. There are other threads about Ruth here and on woodenboat. com
     
  12. NoEyeDeer
    Joined: Jun 2010
    Posts: 982
    Likes: 30, Points: 28, Legacy Rep: 300
    Location: Australia

    NoEyeDeer Senior Member

    You can always scarf join for length if you have to. Beginners are often a bit worried about scarfing, but it's not difficult.
     
  13. whosail
    Joined: Nov 2014
    Posts: 10
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Henderson,NV

    whosail Junior Member

    Ruth build

    Thanks guys appreciate the info. We do have Lowes and Home Depot so I will investigate. As far as laminating, years ago I laminated oak frames into a Monterey Clipper (fish boat). If I laminate I would have to pick up the bend and am not quite sure how to go about this. In the Monterey we could get a little sloppy with the glue. We picked up the bend right in the hull, however picking up the bend for gunwales and stringer for the Ruth might be difficult unless I fastened them to the frames and be extra, extra careful with the process. Making a pattern would be ideal, but not available or ! (help)

    I will be scarfing.

    Dave
     
  14. NoEyeDeer
    Joined: Jun 2010
    Posts: 982
    Likes: 30, Points: 28, Legacy Rep: 300
    Location: Australia

    NoEyeDeer Senior Member

    Can't see why you couldn't laminate them in situ on the frames. The frames will be set up on a strongback anyway so...
     

  15. upchurchmr
    Joined: Feb 2011
    Posts: 2,866
    Likes: 89, Points: 48, Legacy Rep: 579
    Location: Ft. Worth, Tx, USA

    upchurchmr Senior Member

    I personally would do just that.

    It is a vertical bend that is difficult, so split the gunwale in a horizontal plane, put one half on the frames, straighten up all the stringers like you want them, then attach the top 1/2 of the gunwale.

    I generally use deck screws thru the stringer into the frame to set the position. That way I can adjust as much as I need. When it is set I pull out a few joint screws, epoxy the joint, and put the screws back in to hold it while it cures.

    If you want to just lash the joints, you can always cut loose one that is out of place and re-do it.

    PS, I haven't done a Ruth but I have done 6 SOF kayaks.
     
Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.