New build hull turnover

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by Wayne Grabow, Apr 4, 2010.

  1. Wayne Grabow
    Joined: Aug 2003
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    Wayne Grabow Senior Member

    Great milestone to finally turn over the hull. Now I start with epoxy and glass on the inside of the bottom, finish the transom, add decking, and onward. Still it is great to be past all the bottom sanding and finishing.[​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
     
    1 person likes this.
  2. chuckboat
    Joined: Apr 2010
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    chuckboat Mr. Ishman

    WOW! Looking good.
     
  3. Wayne Grabow
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    Wayne Grabow Senior Member

    Thank you for your kind reply. Progress continues, and it finally is starting to look like a real boat. Other tasks intrude on my time; don't know when it will be finished, but I am getting impatient.[​IMG][/IMG][/IMG]
     
  4. Landlubber
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    Landlubber Senior Member

    Good on ya Wayne, keep up the good work, be patient, it will soon be over but the quality of your work will be admired for decades to come, so don't rush it.
     
  5. chuckboat
    Joined: Apr 2010
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    Location: Tennessee

    chuckboat Mr. Ishman

    Yeah, Wayne, I know what you mean. My project is currently delayed due to funding. (Lack of) I have built a scale model from my plans though. I keep the model here on my desk to feed the dream of getting it built and into the water. I am hoping to begin construction within the year, but that will all depend on the economy and other business developments. It's nice to have a dream but the reality of life is "Basic needs before recreation".
     
  6. KnottyBuoyz
    Joined: Jul 2006
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    KnottyBuoyz Provocateur & Raconteur

    Very nice Wayne. Keep up the good work. I'm afraid I'll become too impatient when I get near the end and rush things a little too much. I think you have to remind yourself to take the extra time to do it right the first time 'cause you'll never have the time to go back and do it right. Otherwise, looking forward to seeing the finished boat all wet! Carry on!
     
  7. slopoke21m
    Joined: Jul 2010
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    Location: Gardnerville, Nv

    slopoke21m new guy

    LOL...I can relate...built this a while back...
    [​IMG]
    Louie
     
  8. Wayne Grabow
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    Wayne Grabow Senior Member

    Ready to leave the shop

    [​IMG][/IMG][/IMG]

    Still needs touch up, but it is ready to have the engine and wiring installed. The trailer has been ordered. I want to put cushions in, a bimini top created, and a travel cover for protection, but with winter closing in, I may have all winter for that.
     
  9. TeddyDiver
    Joined: Dec 2007
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    TeddyDiver Gollywobbler

    Great work Wayne! :)
     
  10. sean-nós
    Joined: May 2010
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    sean-nós Senior Member

    Looks great, Time for her to pay you back for the blood,sweat and tears,and she will.:) Now for the next one.:D
     
  11. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    Nice craft, well done!
     
  12. Wayne Grabow
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    Wayne Grabow Senior Member

    Thanks for the favorable comments. It always means more when it comes from someone who understands what it takes to design and build a boat. Actually there has been no real "blood, sweat, and tears". I really enjoy the mental stimulation of design problems; also the creativity of bringing a vision into reality; and the physical exercise is healthy too. Finally, I have a very comfortable shop now; far superior to any previous projects. However, this boat is to be considered a prototype; the first powerboat I have designed and, as such, I am constantly asking "What can be improved on?" and can see some areas to try a different approach.

    The hull was conceptualized as a fast launch with moderate power, about 30 hp, hence the B/L ratio is low and the weight is fairly light. I have learned that standard trailers are made for higher B/L ratios and smaller outboards have small props which may allow excess slippage. Also I now better understand the requirements for controls and interior arrangement and wish that I had incorporated more forethought into the initial framing so that the interior could easily look more finished.

    "Now for the next one" is an attractive phrase to me. I just don't like the slow progress; too many other tasks and commitments to see the rate of progress I desire. You have to be crazy to do this stuff repeatedly, but I guess I qualify.
     
  13. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Wayne, "for your next one" learn how to cope with the Powder Horn issue in the forward sections of the sheer. This is a very common issue with most novice designer that haven't had training by a pro designer. It's an easy thing to fix, but you have to be aware of the issue to catch it. It's quite noticeable in the very first image posted.
     
  14. Wayne Grabow
    Joined: Aug 2003
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    Wayne Grabow Senior Member

    PAR: "you have to be aware of the issue to catch it" Thank you for your constructive criticism. I appreciate your comments. I realized that I had a "powderhorn" curve to the forward sheer. It resulted from the intersection of two conic projections, as you probably know. The entire hull surface is developable. I thought about fixing it, but elected that as a minor aesthetic concern (to me), it wasn't worth worrying about. But I respect the opinion of the experts here such as yourself, and perhaps should have given it more consideration. My initial thoughts are to alter the foredeck projection or simply warp it using a non-developable shape. Care to give me a hint as to an easy fix?
     

  15. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

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