New boat

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Braydenh28, Jul 12, 2015.

  1. Braydenh28
    Joined: Jul 2015
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    Braydenh28 Junior Member

    Hi guys I have recently brought a 5 meter Hartley powered by a old 105 Chrysler. Picked boat up pretty cheap. I thought I would join forum to share progress and also get tips as have no experiance with repairing boats, I have been reading afew post on forum and that to get info. The boat has no rot that is obvious enough and needs a good paint up and that, would it be reccomended to fiberglass or is that a waste, any info for me would be much appreciated. Thanks a lot brayden
     

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  2. Braydenh28
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    Braydenh28 Junior Member

    Picture
     

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  3. Braydenh28
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    Braydenh28 Junior Member

    Picture 3
     

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  4. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    gonzo Senior Member

    For a fiberglass job to be successful, all the paint needs to be removed. That means that all the hardware has to be removed too. Unless there is a problem, paint should be fine.
     
  5. Braydenh28
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    Braydenh28 Junior Member

    I am planning to repair and replaint, I have been told by previous owner it has a sealer, primer and lead paint, there is a small crack in the bottom of hull very small that has been repaired with fiberglass but isn't very good so will have to seal up wee split or recover in more fiberglass maybe...Do I have to sand hull right back to the ply before I repaint? Do I need to re seal it first and what to use to fix wee split also do I need to reprime before I paint. There is no rot
     
  6. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    I certainly would not be sanding back any paint unless it is cracked or peeling, but I would sand around the "wee split" to see what is happening there. I'm not sure what the sealer would be, a primer as the name suggests is the first coat. And if it is red lead, it must be a pretty old job, you can't get that stuff today that I know of. So be careful with sanding it, you don't get any health benefits from ingesting it.
     
  7. FMS
    Joined: Jul 2011
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    FMS Senior Member

    Fix the crack or "split" properly first. Then only after that's fixed 100% do any cosmetic painting. Post photos of the "small crack" if you have any question. My worry would be that if it was fixed and cracked again there could be a larger issue causing it to crack.
     
  8. Braydenh28
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    Braydenh28 Junior Member

    Ok cheers guys I will take photos tomorrow In daylight,
     
  9. Braydenh28
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    Braydenh28 Junior Member

    What are me steps for painting?... Ino for a car you sand back to steel apply etch primer on steel, apply body filler then primer then base then clear... Is there a etch primer type product I need to apply to the bare patches of ply? Or do I just use a primer? Do I need to seal after final coat of paint has been applied?
     
  10. Braydenh28
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    Braydenh28 Junior Member

    Photo
     

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  11. Braydenh28
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    Braydenh28 Junior Member

    Another
     

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  12. Braydenh28
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    Braydenh28 Junior Member

    Next photi
     

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  13. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    In what kind of state is the "refrigerator" on the back ?
     
  14. Braydenh28
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    Braydenh28 Junior Member

    Lol it I guess u talking about the old outboard... It runs
     

  15. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    This boat doesn't appear to be an encapsulated build, so the procedure is to remove any loose and flaking paint, sand back the edges to "feather" them into surrounding areas, fill any places necessary, prime, then paint. Don't be tempted to use a pressure washer, which would be a quick way to remove loose stuff, as it'll just blast off bits of wood too, making more work for yourself.

    Once the loose stuff is removed and the boat roughly sanded, you'll see all the areas that need attention. Repair these before filler is used. Automotive fillers generally don't work on boats. They usually just pop right off, when the wood expands and contracts with moisture content. Use an epoxy filler, which you can make yourself or buy as a pre-mix (such as QuickFair from System Three). After the repairs and filling are done, prep the surfaces just like it's a piece of outdoor furniture and paint it.
     
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