New antifoul discovery - 100% effective AND green

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by brian eiland, May 16, 2009.

  1. Boston

    Boston Previous Member

    yah I'm not so sure grease is exactly legal in most places, or at least not as antifouling

    two things i've always thought might help. One would be to occasionally electrify the underside of the boat with an alternating current. If a conductive grid where present under the paint, and that paint not an insulator, then a fairly strong current every once in a while might just put a dent in the growth process. Anyone ever try that ? or something like it, maybe a sponge or brush thats got a couple of leads and fries the little darlings as you move it over the underside of the hull ?

    another I though of was if your in predominantly salt water and your growth is barnacles and sea weeds, then wouldn't you kill off most of it by simply moving up a freshwater river a few miles and let the fresh water kill off the stuff. Making more easily removed ?
     
  2. Frosty

    Frosty Previous Member

    Grease works --it is not illegal-- the barnacles do not grow on grease.
     
  3. whitepointer23

    whitepointer23 Previous Member

    you can buy electric antifouling kits, don't know if they work or not.
     
  4. Frosty

    Frosty Previous Member

    Infact its old technology, works well but usually for larger vessels.
     
  5. Silver Raven
    Joined: Oct 2011
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    Location: Far North Queensland, Australia

    Silver Raven Senior Member

    Gooday 'pipe' & others - What is it about this subject - that I don't understand.

    Read post # 1 1 4 What's up with the difficulty here. Steal mom's 'teflon' ironing spray - 4 coats - let dry - 2 years - no barnies.
    Use teflon - silicon, etc, lots of new (only been out for the last 40 years) stuff on the market & cheep as chips (or horse, pig, roo, wallaby - see cooking section) easy-peasy - user friendly. Electric systems would cost more in 1 year than I've spent in the last 25 years.

    Ciao & go eat good food complete with 'sundowners' X 6 (kiwi speak), james
     
  6. sdowney717
    Joined: Nov 2010
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    Location: Newport News VA

    sdowney717 Senior Member

    if thinking of grease use a lithium based grease. Lithium greases are not easily washed away with water. Something like a sticky marine axle grease designed for trailer bearings.
     
    1 person likes this.
  7. powerabout
    Joined: Nov 2007
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    powerabout Senior Member

    as long as it doesnt leave any trace you can see in the water
     
  8. brian eiland
    Joined: Jun 2002
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    Location: St Augustine Fl, Thailand

    brian eiland Senior Member

    Interesting, thanks for that Silver Raven

    I just heard a bit on the radio about this super slippery product called LiquiGlide.
    http://www.liqui-glide.com/

    Wonder if we can find some uses for this in our marine world?

    Just noticed this:
    Q: Can the coating be put on anything else?

    A: We’ve been able to put it on just about everything we’ve tried so far: glass, plastic, metal, ceramic…
     
  9. brian eiland
    Joined: Jun 2002
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    Location: St Augustine Fl, Thailand

    brian eiland Senior Member

    LiquiGlide

    Created at MIT with their help

    A research group at MIT has developed LiquiGlide, a slippery, non-toxic coating that makes sure every last drop of any condiment flows right ...

    http://www.gizmag.com/liquiglide-coating/22660/
     

  10. brian eiland
    Joined: Jun 2002
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    Location: St Augustine Fl, Thailand

    brian eiland Senior Member

    Antifouling Technology, based on Shark's Skin

    This subject came up back on page 6 of this subject thread, but never generated a lot of discussion. I'mn on their mailing list and keep getting press releases, but not many relating to marine use. Seems the medical field is a much more viable market....dollar wise.

    But we should keep track of this technology,....could be a real game changer for pleasure boats.

    I mentioned this over on another subject thread, but got very little responce. Hopefully the pleasure boater will benefit from this technology real soon?

    Sharklet? Marine | Sharklet
     
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