New Age Trawler/Motorsailer; Kite assisted PowerYacht

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by brian eiland, Nov 20, 2007.

  1. Tad
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    Tad Boat Designer

    If it was me, and if the voyage was a spectacular success, or even made predictions, I would be getting the story out....asap. The fact is that almost every attempt to revive commercial sail in the past 40 years has ended in failure. The only successes I can think of are the "cattlemarans" of the Caribbean tourist industry. The larger the project the bigger the failure.

    I'm suggesting we eliminate large vessels and transoceanic freight of useless consumer goods. The earth and human society cannot sustain it. Local production and transportation lends itself to small units which spread the load and the wealth around, but keep it local. I'm taking about 50-100 miles max.

    I think putting kites on oil tankers is fooling yourself that you have done something good. Eliminate the need for that oil to be processed, shipped, stored, distributed, sold several times over, and then burnt, and perhaps you really have done something good.

    I have carried freight under sail, done offshore commercial fishing under sail, even carried livestock under sail. The schedule is always there, and its almost impossible to ignore. There are numerous external forces at work, the wind, the tide, connections, crew changes, it's endless. What will happen when the Skipper of Beluga SkySails phones head office...."Forget the schedule guys, we're saving fuel". Head office will kindly remind him that there is a schedule, and he'd best keep to it.
     
  2. Guillermo
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    Guillermo Ingeniero Naval

    Tad,
    Shipping is the most efficient transport system in terms of energy used per ton/mile carried. 800 times less than the airplane. It is also the cheapest system in terms of total cost per ton/mile. Better than trucks and even trains.
    Land and air transport have also several other drawbacks, both in enviromental costs, investments needed and infrastructures saturation.
    Should we ban airplanes, trucks and trains? ;)

    Some interesting info:
    http://www.uofaweb.ualberta.ca/ipe//pdfs/TransportPaper-Cappato_Capocaccia.pdf
    http://www.epolitix.com/EN/Forums/Sea and Water/cf53bb1d-5e2b-4798-bb00-8336776faed2.htm
    http://www.dft.gov.uk/about/strategy/transportstrategy/hmtlsustaintranssys

    Interesting reading:
    Jeffrey Samuel Barkin. “The Counterintuitive Relationship Between Globalization and Climate Change.” Global Environmental Politics, vol. 3, #3 (August 2003), pp. 8-13. Abstract:
    "Scholars and activists are concerned, sometimes simultaneously, with mitigation of anthropogenic climate change and the environmental effects of globalization. Many analysts argue that a solution to both problems is localization; increasing the costs of transportation should increase the cost of long-distance transportation, making local and regional exchange economically relatively more efficient. The argument here, however, is that dealing with climate change will have the effect of reinforcing patterns of economic globalization, at the expense of patterns of economic nationalization and continentalization. Transportation by sea has historically been, and continues to be, more fuel-efficient than transportation by land. Limiting anthropogenic carbon emissions in transportation therefore favors sea transport over land transport. Historically, patterns of trade favored global seaborne trade routes over trade within land-based regions. The model to look in understanding the effect of action on climate change on global trade pattens, therefore, is not the future proposed by the localists, it is at historical patterns."

    Cheers.
     
  3. Guillermo
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    Guillermo Ingeniero Naval

    http://www.skysails.info/index.php?...ws]=104&tx_ttnews[backPid]=6&cHash=db100ad2b6

    Hamburg / Mo-I-Rana, 14 March 2008. “We can once again actually ‘sail’ with cargo ships, thus opening a new chapter in the history of commercial shipping,“ was the verdict from Captain Lutz Heldt following his return from the nearly two-month maiden voyage of the multi-purpose heavy-lift project carrier “Beluga SkySails”, which sailed from Germany to Venezuela, the United States and Norway. In even moderate winds, the first flights of an initial 160-square-meter towing kite propulsion system from the Hamburg-based manufacturer SkySails demonstrated how this innovative auxiliary propulsion system was able to substitute for 20% of the engine’s power. “With that we impressively validated the original expectations we had for the system“, was how SkySails managing director Stephan Wrage (35) assessed the first practical trials aboard the Beluga ship. “In the future, depending on the route and weather conditions, we’ll be able to post fuel savings of between 10% and 35% using wind power.” The “Beluga SkySails” set sail to Venezuela from Bremen on 22 January and reached the Norwegian port of Mo-I-Rana on 13 March 2008 after travelling a total of 11,952 nautical miles. The testing of the SkySails-System on board the ship newbuilding MV “Beluga SkySails” to be equipped with this innovative technology is being co-funded with some 1.2 million euros as part of the European Union’s “LIFE” program.

    “The MV ´Beluga SkySails’ maiden voyage is proof in motion of a new kind of hybrid drive on the water that simultaneously reduces both voyage costs and climate-damaging emissions,“ said Niels Stolberg (47), the president and CEO of the Bremen-based project and heavy-lift cargo shipping company Beluga Shipping.

    “The initial focus during the first half of what is set to be an approximately 12-months pilot testing phase aboard the “Beluga SkySails” is on calibration work and adjustments to stabilize the towing kite propulsion,” reported Stephan Brabeck (46), the technical director of SkySails, adding how “in the second half the flight times will be extended and the performance perfected.” On numerous days during the maiden voyage the system was put in action for periods of between a few minutes and up to eight hours. During that time the SkySails-System pulled the ship with up to 5 tons of power at force 5 winds, which when compared to the engine output represents a relief of more than 20%. Projected onto an entire day, this performance by the “Beluga SkySails” represents savings of about 2.5 tons of fuel and more than $1,000 a day.

    Captain Lutz Heldt (57) is impressed with the first flights of the 160 square-meter SkySails aboard the MV “Beluga SkySails”. After the pilot phase the towing kite will be replaced by one that is twice the size, delivering double the amount of energy and which will save two times as much fuel and climate-damaging emissions. Beluga Shipping GmbH in Bremen expects a drop in bunker costs of approximately $2,000 per operating day. The shipping company will be giving part of these savings – 20 percent – directly to the crew as an incentive. Kites with a sail surface of up to 600 square meters will be used on two larger Beluga P-Series carriers that are to be outfitted with SkySails-Systems in the future. Currently under construction, each vessel will have 20,000 tons deadweight and on-board cranes with a lifting capacity of 800 to 1,400 tons.


    The WINTECC project
    The goal of the WINTECC (WINd propulsion TEChnology for Cargo vessels) project, which is partly funded by the EU as part of its “LIFE“ program, is to measure the savings in energy and CO2 that can be achieved with the help of an innovative propulsion technology. “By cofunding this undertaking we want to set a clear signal for climate relevant technologies of the future. And we are delighted that the SkySails technology offers such an enormous global potential for savings“, commented Paul F. Nemitz, deputy head of the European Commission’s Maritime Policy Task Force, about promoting the project. The EU is contributing 1.2 million euros of the project’s total budget of 4 million euros as part of its “LIFE” program. Also taking part in the undertaking besides Beluga Fleet Management GmbH & Co. KG in Bremen and the manufacturer SkySails from Hamburg are the companies OceanWaveS in Lüneburg and ALDEBARAN in Hamburg. (Demonstration of an Innovative Wind Propulsion Technology for Cargo Vessels, Project Number: LIFE06 ENV/D/000479)
     
  4. Tad
    Joined: Mar 2002
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    Tad Boat Designer

    I think the efficiency of water transport is pretty obvious to those with a understanding of basic naval architecture. But it seems to be big news to many in the transportation industry. Texas A&M University just completed a study and found that barges are the most efficient way to move cargo into the heart of the USA via the river system. Big news!

    With sadness I've watched the European canal transportation system be replaced by trucking. This has endless impact, more roads, bigger bridges, more noise, pollution, oil required, etc. Barges chugging quietly up canals filled with ducks is far more sustainable long term.

    I am certainly not advocating one form of transportation over any other. If things must be shipped by all means do it via water. What I am advocating is reducing the need for massive global shipping of everything via every means.

    What this means is everyone thinking seriously about every purchase we make. Banning things never works, to create a truly sustainable future we must eliminate or reduce the need for the endless pollution which supports the "modern lifestyle". This involves choices, for instance I took my last jet flight several years ago. I'm done with that technology.

    With further reading I have found that the Beluga SkySails delivered manufacturing equipment from Germany to a wood plant in Venezuela. Is this plant producing construction material for the folks of Venezuela? I don't know but I guess the plant is owned by foreigners producing product from cheap local materials to be shipped to the USA and Europe. No doubt it's accompanied with a "sustainable green" sticker. Americans and Europeans (being the largest consumers) have to look at this and think about the real cost to the environment for that cheap construction material.
     
  5. Guillermo
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    Guillermo Ingeniero Naval

    I totally agree. One of the most significative ways to reduce the spoiling of earth is educating developed countries people to be sensible consumers instead of vain, hedonistic and compulsive ones. We shouldn't buy a new car if our old one is still going strong (and even better, increasingly use our local BMW*), we shouldn't buy several dozen pairs of shoes if we manage with just three pairs, etc, etc,etc. But unluckily this is proving to be a bigger, dificultier and slower task to perform than reducing CO2 and other emissions and wastage by just developing and using improved technology, which is our present time-race nowadays. There's no politician willing to commit political suicide by telling voters they are behaving like ungrown children. It's much easier to blame multinationals and the like, and obligue them to develope and use eco-friendly systems, whatever that means.

    Cheers.

    (*) BMW = Bus, Metro & Walking.
     
  6. mark424x
    Joined: Feb 2006
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    mark424x Junior Member

    Ok, I'll be the guinea pig and get this wrong. Hopefully someone can correct me.

    5 tons, guessing at 20 knots?

    5 tons-force = 10,000 lbf
    20 knots = 33.7 ft/s
    1 HP = 550 ft lpf/s

    10,000 lbf * 33.7 ft/s / 550 = 612.7 HP

    612 HP/ 160 sq m = 3.8 HP/sqm

    Sounds a little high. I thought their target was 2HP/sqm.
     
  7. Guillermo
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    Guillermo Ingeniero Naval

    Yes, 5 tons sounds pretty high for a 160 sqm kite as an average. If my memory doesn't fail me, 1.4 HP was the expected average and 2 HP a maximum one. Probably that figure is instant pull at some point of the dynamic flight in a certain moment, so a maximum (they continuously record pull at the constant-tension whinch). I'll ask the guys.

    Cheers.
     
  8. juiceclark

    juiceclark Previous Member

    Love it! I wonder if one could utilize a dinghy davit dual purpose for launching the sail? You know...attach the sail to the davit, point it straight-up, extend fully and then release.

    The sail just seems the most convenient and idiot-proof way to take advantage of wind propulsion in a power boat. Moreover, there's nothing in the way when not in use. If I can run a 50' sportfish at 7k with the genny pushing hydrolics, I'll bet a small sail could give us 11k or 5k without power.

    Tony in Sw FL
     
  9. Guillermo
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    Guillermo Ingeniero Naval

    Sensible idea! Probably an hydraulic crane with a double use for kite launcher and deck hardware and light cargo handlig, could significantly reduce the initial investment. :)

    Cheers.
     

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  10. mark424x
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    mark424x Junior Member

    Yes, nice idea. Certainly the key to making this successful is the launch and recovery process. I'd think for powerboaters to go for it, it would have to be as easy as a furling system on a sailboat. A couple other thoughts:

    Perhaps a small pilot kite that would have just enough power to keep a collapsed main kite aloft, with say 50' of line attached to the main kite (so it would fly above the main kite). If you could de-power the main kite, you would also use the pilot kite to keep the main kite out of the water during recovery. One of my goals would be to use a kite for roll stabilization in addition to motive power. Perhaps the small pilot kite could be used stand alone in heavier air or just for some roll stabilization.

    I'd also think you'd want to have little tension in the control lines, so while the main force is applied to the boat at the optimal place, control could be done from a flybridge, portugese bridge, or other convenient location.

    Optimally, we'd have some sort of snuffer or sock, perhaps an on deck tube that you draw the kite into for storage/relaunch, again to make launch/recovery very simple and easy for one person.
     
  11. Guillermo
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    Guillermo Ingeniero Naval

    It's difficult (although probably not impossible) the kite to collapse down, as it is obligued to constantly fly in a figure of eight by the canopy actuator. All control lines are brought to this canopy.

    Interestingly, one of the main challenges to develope the Skysails was the towing cable, as it has to host the control wires in its core, which brings the problem of the matching of the different stretching properties of the various materials.

    Launching and retrieving the kite in a simple manner was the main goal, as it is basic not obliging to increase the crew number or make them to learn and perform hard skills. As far as I know it's now a matter of a couple of ordinary seamen with little fuss. A kite hosting underdeck tube has already been considered.

    Cheers.
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2008
  12. mark424x
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    mark424x Junior Member

    I understand. I was thinking of the case of a modest pleasurecraft and assuming that it would be a passive kite without active flight patterns and controller. Thanks.
     
  13. brian eiland
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    brian eiland Senior Member

    Interesting Blog Submission

    Smoother sailing on kite-and-diesel hybrid ships

    From sails to steam to diesel – and back to sails. That’s what some innovative shipping companies advocate to clean up the polluting cocktail of smokestack spew from tankers and yachts. As a proof of concept, this week the MV Beluga SkySails, a ship outfitted with a 160-square-meter kite, finished a breezy voyage from Germany to Venezuela, the United States and Norway, powered in part by wind across 11,952 nautical miles.

    The Beluga SkySails system uses software that charts a course to find the best wind conditions, and compressed air to change the angle of the kite to match different wind speeds and weather. The European Union-funded company’s chief executive expects to see fuel savings of 10 to 35 percent using wind power, depending on the route. To achieve further increases, the company expects to move to a larger sail of about 320 square meters later in 2008.

    Kites are more than just a gimmick; simple as they may be, they’re a legitimate avenue of research, along with investigations into speed reductions, the potential to switch to less harmful fuels from diesel, and the elimination of drag. For example, in 2005 a shipping company unveiled its “concept car carrier” – alas, not the platform upon which all concept cars are shuttled around to motor shows, but rather a zero-emissions, solar/wind/fuel-cell-powered tanker called the E/S Orcelle. But before that vessel makes it out into the open waters, we’ll more likely see ships run on gas, probably with sleeker profiles and improvements in propeller design. Consider, for example, a company called PAX Scientific that designs biomimetic, spiral-shaped turbines that could help ships cut through water more smoothly, improving their fuel efficiency by about 10 percent.

    It remains to be seen whether retrofitting sails to tankers will catch on, but Skysails estimates the potential upgrade market for its system at more than 40,000 ships. Through 2013, Skysails is targeting less than 1% of that market—about 400 ships.

    A key part of the success of sails will depend on incorporating satellite predictions and long-range weather forecasts to help chart courses that are energy-efficient without sacrificing much on speed. Past efforts to launch kite-based ship propulsion have floundered due to the unpredictability of wind conditions.

    And there’s definitely room for improvement in long-distance shipping. A 2003 University of Delaware study found that the world shipping fleet consumes about 289 million tons of fuel each year, of course accompanied by a gargantuan emissions profile. According to Geotimes, “the world’s fleet of cargo ships, fueled by refinery leftovers — black sludge that’s cheaper and thicker than crude oil — emits more carbon dioxide than the world’s fleet of airplanes.”

    ...from a blog "Plenty" green magazine
     
  14. Guillermo
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    Guillermo Ingeniero Naval


  15. kach22i
    Joined: Feb 2005
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    kach22i Architect

    I've just discovered that the "kite" method may not be "new age" but before 2000BC!

    Check this out.

    Mysterious Stern Appendage
    http://www.worldwideflood.com/ark/hull_form/ancient_hull_form.htm
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Looks more like a kite to me, how about you?

    What do you see?

    I see a BOW Appendage for kite drive.:)

    Video of a modern kite sail in action:
    http://www.metacafe.com/watch/766538/kiteboat_hawaii/

    http://willienelsonpri.com/peace/370/a-peaceful-solution-dan-tracy.html
    [​IMG]

    The bow prowl kind of acts like the rod in the rod & reel in the video. In this ancient boat a crew member could scale the bow apendage and untangle the kite if needed. This design would be less likely in allowing the kite to touch the water and get wet. No synethic cloth back then, they would want to keep the cotton or silk dry at all cost.
     
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