NEW affordable, long-term liveaboard design query

Discussion in 'Projects & Proposals' started by Filmdaddy, Dec 22, 2005.

  1. Filmdaddy

    Filmdaddy Previous Member

    After a hiatus, I am back and asking, again, for ideas about a lumberyard design boat that would function as a long-term liveaboard. What tips or ideas are out there for making the boat quick and easy to build, maintain and operate? Power, materials, plans, size... any information is solicited and will be gratefully received.
     
  2. JPC
    Joined: Jun 2005
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    Location: Hong Kong

    JPC Junior Member

    Noting your response to the results in your earlier thread, I'm wondering if you might have an example of a production boat that has some of the features that YOU like. Maybe that would coalesce the comments towards ideas that are useful for you. (I know that you're not actually looking for comments on an existing boat, per se, but maybe this would help simply by providing a starting point for a conversation that you could then redirect as certain ideas appeal/don't-appeal).

    Are there some out there that have caught your eye or inspired your thoughts towards the project you've described?
     
  3. Filmdaddy

    Filmdaddy Previous Member

    I guess the prototype that intrigues me the most is George Beuhler's "Pilgrim". Go to http://www.georgebuehler.com/Pilgrim.html, and check it out. It can, according the the text, be built for $15,000 in 1998 dollars. It isn't perfect for the intended use, but it is closer than most of the other boats I've seen, and I can see how it could be modified to become a superb liveaboard. (Mr. Beuhler isn't interested in changing anything. I corresponded with him briefly, and he says the boat is what it is. i agree with him, of course. I just have these dreams...)
    "Loose Moose" is another example of a boat that embodies some of the things that I would like to see - simple, fast build...
     
  4. Deering
    Joined: Feb 2005
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    Location: Juneau, Alaska

    Deering Senior Member

    Besides living aboard it, what else do you want to do with it? Cross oceans? Catch fish? Leave it parked at the marina? Do you have strong feelings about a particular aesthetic?

    Form follows function, particularly as you get more "affordable".
     
  5. yipster
    Joined: Oct 2002
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    Location: netherlands

    yipster designer

    once saw a 15 meter sharpie flatbottom furnished inside, (most work and biggest part of the $) having the port side panel made separatly and placed in after interior installations.
     
  6. Filmdaddy

    Filmdaddy Previous Member

    Deering...
    No particular preconceptions, beyond an interest in at least a 'limp-home' capacity sail plan. Most of the time, the boat would be cruising in good weather, on the hook in bad. Some consideration in dealing with cold weather would be appreciated. There is no interest whatsoever in crossing oceans. Rivers are more likely, with lakes from small to large the norm. Build must be fast, easy and cheap. The aesthetic component would reflect entirely your observation that form follows function. A "beautiful" boat would be one that would provide a low technology home where two people could live with warmth and a touch or privacy when required, and make their slow, gentle way from place to place without much fuss at all. Fishing (sport) would be a plus, marinas will be an exception.

    Yipster...
    Now that's just clever! Creative, thinking 'outside the hull'! What do you think of the idea of an Ikea interior? Instead of hand crafting and fitting the interior, simply buy good but cheap furniture and cabinetry and install it in the boat. It would speed up construction, and cut down on the costs.
     
  7. Deering
    Joined: Feb 2005
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    Location: Juneau, Alaska

    Deering Senior Member

    My older brother has expressed very similar thoughts to yours. Here's a design we looked at which may have promise. Simple construction, plywood stitch & glue for quick assembly. Low costs. Easily scaled in size. http://www.boatplans-online.com/studyplans/GT27_study.htm

    Not a blue water boat by any stretch, but looks like it can handle a bit of chop with good freeboard. Low draft. Should be stable on the hook which is a plus for a liveaboard.

    My guess is that two reasonably capable guys could build this boat in a month if they stayed on task (fine print: your mileage may vary. does not include outfitting).
     
  8. Filmdaddy

    Filmdaddy Previous Member

    Yeah, I like the concept. I actually considered this a while back, and am still contemplating the possibilities. I might like a little more room, though. How do you think it would scale up to, say, 33 feet?
     
  9. Deering
    Joined: Feb 2005
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    Location: Juneau, Alaska

    Deering Senior Member

    Pretty easily I would think. You might need to increase scantlings a bit. Ask the boys over at Bateau if they could enlarge it.

    Often with ply construction you want to keep the size within a certain multiplier to maximize material usage. For instance, it would be a mistake to make a hull bottom 49 inches wide...
     
  10. Filmdaddy

    Filmdaddy Previous Member

    Yeah, too right. That's why I mentioned lumberyard boats. I don't know who coined the phrase, but it is exactly right - as little carpentry and cabinetmaking as possible because the wood is used as it comes from the lumberyard.
    Stitch and glue seems like such a no-brainer, easy, economical, fast, the resulting boat can be as sturdy and long-lived as any other boat, given the same maintenance. About the only negative I've been able to find is that, as a construction method, it requires a design with hard chines. And for me, that's not a bad thing at all.
    In your opinion, how hard would it be to add the 'limp home' sail plan to this design?
     
  11. Deering
    Joined: Feb 2005
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    Location: Juneau, Alaska

    Deering Senior Member

    Can't help you on the limp home sail plan - up here our backup propulsion is a second outboard.

    But it can't be that tough - a stick and a bedsheet I figure, though some smartypants on this list will go on and on about stability and bending forces... and they'll use fancy nautical terms like 'keel' and 'rudder' and 'boom'.

    Get a 9.9 hp high-thrust outboard and you'll be all set.
     
  12. Filmdaddy

    Filmdaddy Previous Member

    <grin> Thanks. I'll start checking the Wabaso site.
     
  13. SamSam
    Joined: Feb 2005
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    Location: Coastal Georgia

    SamSam Senior Member

    This is something that you might at least get ideas from. Sam
    http://houseboatdesigns.com/eco50build.htm
     
  14. Filmdaddy

    Filmdaddy Previous Member

    Thanks, Samsam. Good site. Food for thought.
     

  15. SamSam
    Joined: Feb 2005
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    Location: Coastal Georgia

    SamSam Senior Member

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