New 14'-16' Daysailer/Weekender Design: Raison d'etre

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by Doug Lord, Nov 11, 2011.

  1. CloudDiver
    Joined: Jun 2014
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    CloudDiver Senior Member

    Awesome! You do great work!

     
  2. pogo
    Joined: Mar 2010
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    pogo ingenious dilletante

    Pretty good,
    shortened boats.
    But why ?


    pogo
     
  3. CloudDiver
    Joined: Jun 2014
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    Location: San Diego

    CloudDiver Senior Member

    Going back to the OP, using the scow bow design carries the full width of the beam father forward to maximize internal volume.

     
  4. pogo
    Joined: Mar 2010
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    Location: Germany Northsea

    pogo ingenious dilletante

    No , cutting off the bow to maximize volume for a desired length.

    How much does half a meter costs more ?


    pogo
     
  5. Skyak
    Joined: Jul 2012
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    Skyak Senior Member

    It looks to me like the waterline comes to within six inches of a point. The 'gain in volume' is angled below and mostly wasted space up near the deck. I can't help concluding that adding waterline length (pointed waterline) and trimming the bulbous bow above the waterline would be a significant improvement with no increase in overall length. Have you considered the noise generated by waves slapping that bow while anchored and trying to sleep?

    The best concepts for daysailor/weekender I have seen are nice sport boats with large cockpits and well designed tents.
     

  6. CloudDiver
    Joined: Jun 2014
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    Location: San Diego

    CloudDiver Senior Member

    I guess we all eventually circle back to the an old universal concept in boat design; "you can't have everything" in a single design.

    My interest in this concept comes from a specific limitation for moorings in my area. On Mission Bay, San Diego California, you can lease a mooring for $600 per year. So if you are willing to dinghy out to your boat, have no pier-side facilities, and of course no live-aboards, $50 a month is the best deal in my region to keep a sail boat in the water. The LOA limitation is 25 feet.

    Using my current Catalina 22 as a base line for 'what I would want if I could build it', and within the 25 foot LOA limitation, I'm hoping I could have something a little quicker and sportier than my C22 with a slightly modest increase in internal space/amenities. That's what got me interested in these threads and the Scow Bow Mini-Transat Teamwork 747.

     
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