NES standard for loadline

Discussion in 'Stability' started by athvas, Nov 29, 2014.

  1. athvas
    Joined: Feb 2013
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    Location: india

    athvas Senior Member

    Hi

    Is there separate NES standard for Loadline or IMO Load line convention to be followed. (Hull openings)
     
  2. NavalSArtichoke
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    NavalSArtichoke Senior Member

    You'll have to provide more information for us provincials - what's NES?
     
  3. Ad Hoc
    Joined: Oct 2008
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    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    Nope.
    Unless you can get obtain Crown immunity, all vessels must comply with IMO regulations.

    Naval Equivalent Standards. It is the previous system used to build warships of old, before Classification slowly began taking that role.
     
  4. NavalSArtichoke
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    NavalSArtichoke Senior Member

    Warships are exempt from having a Load Line according to Article 5(1)(a) of the ICLL Convention. In light of this, it's not clear why the OP thought an NES existed.

    IIRC, naval vessels must meet intact and damage stability criteria developed by the various national defense establishments, which stability criteria usually exceed those applied to commercial vessels.

    I know that several classification societies have developed rules for the construction of naval vessels, but these govern hull structure and machinery. I don't think the various navies have abdicated their role in determining stability criteria for their vessels.
     
  5. Dutch Peter
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    Dutch Peter Senior Member


    Not quite! NES = Naval Engineering Standard, please see below extract


    "Defence Standards (DStan)

    These standards are sponsored by the Ministry of Defence and include aluminium bronzes, aluminium silicon bronzes and copper-nickels used in demanding military applications, where high fracture toughness, low magnetic permeability and excellent corrosion resistance are required.

    The standards explain the various classes required in service (for example, on a submarine) and include details of the mandatory, non-destructive testing by ultrasonic, dye penetrant and X-ray methods.

    The DStan specifications were formerly designated Naval Engineering Standards (NES).

    For further details of DStan, visit www.dstan.mod.uk. "


    Although this is focussed on metals, I'm sure other naval aspects are also covered.
     

  6. Ad Hoc
    Joined: Oct 2008
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    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    Err..quite right.

    I've not used them for over 20 years and over time 'we' euphemistically called them 'equivalent' owing to the mess between Class and NES brewing in the 90s. I should have checked my old dusty booklet behind me in my bookcase first! :p
     
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