Need To Take a Poll - What's your Experience With Outboards?

Discussion in 'Outboards' started by CatBuilder, Oct 26, 2011.

?

How Did Your Outboard Run?

  1. Carburetor: Ran Great! No problems.

    16 vote(s)
    48.5%
  2. Carburetor: Had minor problems.

    9 vote(s)
    27.3%
  3. Carburetor: Didn't run well at all.

    4 vote(s)
    12.1%
  4. Fuel Injection: Ran Great! No problems.

    7 vote(s)
    21.2%
  5. Fuel Injection: Had minor problems.

    2 vote(s)
    6.1%
  6. Fuel Injections: Didn't run well at all.

    1 vote(s)
    3.0%
Multiple votes are allowed.
  1. CatBuilder

    CatBuilder Previous Member

    There are a couple of different types of outboards out there.

    For now, let's limit this poll to outboards that are 4 stroke only. No 2 stroke outboards in the poll please.

    I have separated the poll into the user's experience with outboards that have carburetors and those that have fuel injection. Please select the appropriate one.
     
  2. michael pierzga
    Joined: Dec 2008
    Posts: 4,862
    Likes: 115, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 1180
    Location: spain

    michael pierzga Senior Member

    You can self service a carburetor...you cant service an electronic fuel injection system. If self service is important, go carburetor.
     
  3. CatBuilder

    CatBuilder Previous Member

    I disagree, Michael.

    You never have to service an injector, but you have to service a carb at least once a year when buying gas (petrol) in the States.

    I have fuel injected automobiles, they run just fine on anything, including gas sitting in the tank for 2 months. I have had 4 different fuel injected marine diesels. Same story. Sometimes the filters plugged up from junk in the fuel, but they always ran.

    I have a fuel injected diesel Mercedes engine in my RV. Runs perfectly on anything I put in.

    To contrast this, I have had 3 carb'ed outboards, a no name generator and a Honda EU2000. Every single one of them had carb problems.

    Didn't matter if I ran them out of fuel each time, drained the carb or whatever. They were all just more sensitive to moisture in the fuel and old, stale fuel.

    I am seeing a general trend/pattern to reliability in my own life (with quite a few engines for data points).

    That trend is: Fuel injection engines run better, needing only routine maintenance. Carb'ed engines run worse, needing to be taken apart one or twice a year.

    The brand new Honda 4 Stroke I bought a few years back had carb problems from the first day I used it. I had to take it back.

    I mean look at how badly cars ran before they were all fuel injected. Remember "vapor lock" and things like that? All a part of history with the advent of fuel injection in automobiles.

    I can put any gasoline at all in my fuel injected car. I've even dumped the tank of outboard gas that stopped the outboard dead right into the gas tank of the car and drove on it no problem.

    The purpose of the poll is to find a general trend in the world and see if other people have had the same experience I have had.
     
  4. cyclops2
    Joined: Sep 2010
    Posts: 242
    Likes: 8, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 94
    Location: New Jersy

    cyclops2 Senior Member

    Carburators forever !

    My 1999 9.9 Evinrude CARBURATED 2 stroke has thousands of hours, running time. Retired & run it everyday fishing & cruising. I burn 7 gallons a week in it.
    NO carb problems. Ever. Had 1 bad ignition module last year. That is it.
    The 1988 30 hp 2 stroke Evinrude is still a complete virgin.

    Always able to start & get home with bad fuel. Put a credit card partialy over the carburator opening. Rich mixture, but did the job.
    Computer F I ? NO WAY. Row or a tow job. :mad:
     
  5. michael pierzga
    Joined: Dec 2008
    Posts: 4,862
    Likes: 115, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 1180
    Location: spain

    michael pierzga Senior Member

    Me too, Ive been operating carbureted outboards for 50 years. No significant problems.
    Nothing wrong with fuel injection. Very efficient. I just dont understand it .

    Besides, very few carburated outboard left these days.
     
  6. cyclops2
    Joined: Sep 2010
    Posts: 242
    Likes: 8, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 94
    Location: New Jersy

    cyclops2 Senior Member

    Actually both are

    Equally reliable.

    CatBuilder just happens to be extremly unlucky buying motors.

    NO ONE can time, adjust or do anything to a FI computer. Look at the deniles by Mercruiser FI & ignitions.

    I ordered my 2002 5.0 L V8 with the 2 barrell carb. 0 complaints or problems.
    I am lucky with anything mechanical...........I NEVER take anything back for maintainance.......What is the skill level of the person that is going to work on my vehicle ?.............No checkups. No problems.

    E Tech got smart & stopped the dealers from "" finding "" problems for at least 3 years.
     
  7. Milehog
    Joined: Aug 2006
    Posts: 436
    Likes: 38, Points: 28, Legacy Rep: 215
    Location: NW

    Milehog Clever Quip

    Even though I always drain my carb'd Honda engines, twice after winter layover one or the other engine has experienced issues with the carb's low speed circuit. The affected engine would barely run and stall at times. I put Chevron Techron additive in the fuel and ran the engine on the problematic throttle setting for 10 minutes then let it sit. Both times the engines ran fine the next day.
    Note; I used Techron additive, not diluted fuel system cleaner with Techron. Besides fuel stabilizer this stuff is very helpful for carbureted boat motors with todays fuel.
    Would Seafoam have worked as well? Dunno. I suspect the newer technology stuff is better.
     
  8. cyclops2
    Joined: Sep 2010
    Posts: 242
    Likes: 8, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 94
    Location: New Jersy

    cyclops2 Senior Member

    My winterizing marina in upstate N Y is the best.
    Never a bit of problems mentioned or extra charges. It runs perfect spring summer & fall. I do not even touch the idle mixture screw.
    You guys are having a bad time.

    Ethanol is a SOLVENT. How the heck can it cause problems with varnish ?

    I open a fuel shutoff valve. Let the float do the refill. Wait 1 or 2 hours for the fuel to soften anything. BRAAP. Starts & idles like last time I shut it down.

    I am super lucky. Right.
     
  9. cor
    Joined: May 2008
    Posts: 114
    Likes: 10, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 85
    Location: Alaska

    cor Senior Member

    Carbs and FI both have potential problems and features.

    Generally FI is more realiable and precise. No need to mess with a "choke" control. Sealed systems are not effected by "varnish" build up.

    FI parts tend to be more expensive, but also have a longer service life. Injectors are expensive, but generally last thousands of hours. High pressure electric fuel pumps are also much more expensive than the diagrapham pumps used with carbs.

    Both systems can be worked on, but they each require their own set of skills and tools. FI systems may need special electronic test equipement, but then again engines with multipal carbs need a mercury filled manomitor to sync the carbs properly.

    These are the same type of issues that people used to have with ignition systems. Old motors had points and condenders that could be adjusted by anyone. New motors have CDI (or some other type of electronic) ignition. The CDI systems work great, they almost never need servicing, but when they do the parts are expensive and it requires a different type of skills than the older mechanical systems.

    Personally if I have the option I will take FI and CDI ignition over the older stuff.

    C.O.
    http://whatsintheshop.blogspot.com/
     
  10. michael pierzga
    Joined: Dec 2008
    Posts: 4,862
    Likes: 115, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 1180
    Location: spain

    michael pierzga Senior Member

    The CDI system is great. In the past I had problems with ignition, not with CDI. Perhaps Ive been lucky but Ive had good luck with all brands of outboard motor.
     
  11. TeddyDiver
    Joined: Dec 2007
    Posts: 2,587
    Likes: 125, Points: 73, Legacy Rep: 1650
    Location: Finland/Norway

    TeddyDiver Gollywobbler

    Never drained carburator or anything w/ ouboard tank stored outdoors winter and summer (not in the sun light thou) empty or full of fuel, never problems. Just buy a model with good rep, and it has nothing to do with brand. Like the old 9.9 Evinrude.. it just works not like the 8hp model which was a disaster..
     
  12. michael pierzga
    Joined: Dec 2008
    Posts: 4,862
    Likes: 115, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 1180
    Location: spain

    michael pierzga Senior Member

    The low profile evinrude 9.9, think they marketed it as yachtwin is a very fine motor. The mercury 9 point something, with the FNR shift built into the twist grip handle is also a very fine motor for yacht tendering.

    The big problem in the US is poor fuel quality. They add corn cobs to the fuel to make you feel like youre getting more for your money, but ocasionally a kernal breaks off a cob and wedges its little head in your fuel system. If you are alert to it you can take defensive measures.
     
  13. powerabout
    Joined: Nov 2007
    Posts: 2,925
    Likes: 66, Points: 48, Legacy Rep: 719
    Location: Melbourne/Singapore/Italy

    powerabout Senior Member

    for sure the US has the worst fuel and hence massive problems that the rest of the world doesnt see
    The ethanol being a solvent, as mentioned above, and being very hydroscopic means it cleans /disolves anything it can then it adds water then it evaporates to leave the mess behind
    Run your engine very day you may never see the problem
    Cars have had closed fuel systems for years so the ethanol cant get access to the air to get the water.
    Most have return lines so fuel gets filtered a lot and people use them every day.

    Boats are just starting to have Evaporative emmission regs so it many problems will start to go away, unfortunatey USCG wont allow return line for gasoline.
    Just speak with anyone that raced something in an alcohol class, everything was drained and dried after each use
     
  14. michael pierzga
    Joined: Dec 2008
    Posts: 4,862
    Likes: 115, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 1180
    Location: spain

    michael pierzga Senior Member

    They say that if you limit the fuel tanks contact with air you can slow down the degradation. For instance a full tank or two vents, large diameter vent for refueling that is then closed off, then a smaller vent for running. The secret is to be alert
     

  15. powerabout
    Joined: Nov 2007
    Posts: 2,925
    Likes: 66, Points: 48, Legacy Rep: 719
    Location: Melbourne/Singapore/Italy

    powerabout Senior Member

    A statistitian could say "the more tax you pay on your fuel the better the quality is"??
     
Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.