Need info on this boat

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by pironiero, Sep 12, 2020.

  1. pironiero
    Joined: Apr 2020
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    Location: saint-petersburg, Russia

    pironiero Junior Member

    I wonder what's the name of this sail configuration, why main sail is not attached to the boom and what benefits and drawbacks it provides?

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  2. bajansailor
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    Location: Barbados

    bajansailor Marine Surveyor

    The configuration including the headsail could be called 'running down wind goose-winged' where you have a sail on each side.

    The mainsail is 'loose footed' in that the foot is not attached to the boom (eg by sliders in a track) - it is only attached by the clew outhaul.
    One possible advantage of this is that you can adjust the camber / shape of the sail more easily using the clew outhaul, compared to if the foot was in a track.
    One disadvantage is that the clew has to be much stronger to take all the loads - if the foot of the sail is in or attached to the track uniformly along it's length, there is much less load on the clew outhaul.
     
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  3. pironiero
    Joined: Apr 2020
    Posts: 47
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    Location: saint-petersburg, Russia

    pironiero Junior Member

    Thank you! And what about performance?
     
  4. bajansailor
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    Location: Barbados

    bajansailor Marine Surveyor

    I am not too sure which type would have a better (if any) overall performance.
     
  5. jehardiman
    Joined: Aug 2004
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    Location: Port Orchard, Washington, USA

    jehardiman Senior Member

    If you mean which is the better performer between loose footed or not, it depends on too many other conditions. Broadly speaking, loose footed is marginally better in light winds due to more draft while a footed sail can be made flatter in heavier winds, thus the "shelf and zipper" or the J class "mainstreet boom" styles trying to give one sail both qualities.
     
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  6. Will Gilmore
    Joined: Aug 2017
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    Location: Littleton, nh

    Will Gilmore Senior Member

    It is generally accepted among sailors and sail makers, that loose footed is the way to go. Some captured footed sail's have a "shelf" sewn into them to allow for a more uniform camber and deeper draft at the foot. The boom and outhaul, like bajansailor suggests, needs to be strengthened to allow for flatter, close-hauled sailing. This is especially true if you use mid-boom sheeting.

    -Will (Dragonfly)
     
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