need help choosing proper resins

Discussion in 'All Things Boats & Boating' started by Jason555, Apr 28, 2009.

  1. Jason555
    Joined: Apr 2009
    Posts: 1
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    Location: Syracuse, IN

    Jason555 Jason555

    I am going to attempt to replace the transom of my 1984 Bayliner. I would like specific information on which resins or fiberglass I should use for the strongest hold. Their are many products out their and I want to ensure I get the best one for the job. Any other advice on replacing the wood would be much appreciated. I've never attempted anything like this other than when I replaced the floor of my boat. I think the floor turned out nice but this is a bigger job and much more important. I have the motor (AQ125A) pulled and the stern drive. This Thursday I plan on cutting out the old wood and attempting to replace it. Is their a video I should purchase. Do I put the fiberglass or resin between the plywood and in between the plywood and the fiberglass? It appears the original just has fiberglass around the edges of the wood but I haven't really got that far yet. It also appeared to be 2 slabs of 1/2" and one 3/8". Mainly at this point I need to get the correct bonding materials shipped to me. Vendors, manufacturers, part #'s. Any specific info would be greatly appreciated. I want to be sure I have the best bond possible. I am a rookie after all.
     
  2. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    This topic has been covered many times on this board. Use the search tool and look up "transom replacement" and variations of. I tell novices to use epoxy, simply because is stronger, more water proof and easier for the backyard repair to complete successfully.

    Before cutting into any thing, read up on some of these previous threads, they could save you a fair bit of grief.

    Eventually you'll have a pretty good idea of what's involved and you'll have specific questions which we can answer.

    http://www.boatdesign.net/forums/fi...lding/transom-stringer-replacement-26751.html

    This is a current thread.
     
  3. Jason555
    Joined: Apr 2009
    Posts: 1
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    Location: Syracuse, IN

    Jason555 Jason555

    Transom Replacement - bayliner

    I here the term "skins" being used alot. Can someone explain the meaning a little.
    My transom is approx. 2' x 2' (as far as the plywood area I am replacing). Should I by a gallon of epoxy resin? Is this to much / not enough for the job. I need to cut out the old ply which I think I can handle. After that is their prep work to be done to the area that the new transom plywood will being going onto. I was told to drill holes in the transom fiberglass and bolt the new wood down while I am doing the fiberglass work. So I will probably do that. I suspect that I should use the epoxybetween the transom and the first board. Also in between each piece of ply. Which happens to be 3 layers of 1/2 plywood. When I did my floor last year I used fiberglass that was basically fiberglass hairs that I bought from Autozone. I used this stuff on bigger cracks and resin in smaller areas and to cover the whole floor. I did this hoping to seal the plywood from getting wet. Somewhere in these forums I read the stuff from the auto store is not as strong as what you get from marinas. Is this true or can I use that stuff for this project also?
     

  4. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 19,133
    Likes: 473, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 3967
    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    It sounds like you used mat and polyester resin. You have to use mat with polyester resin, but not with epoxy. Mat is a bulking reinforcement and has very little strength to it. Cloth is the stuff that adds strength.

    As you've probably read in the other threads, I tell novices to use epoxy. It's stronger, easy to work with, don't kick your butt with the smell and more water proof then any other resin.

    You can use temporary screws to hold the plywood in place as the goo cures. This insures good contact, but don't get carried away, you can squeeze out all the goo and have nothing left between the pieces you're gluing.

    The prep after all the demolition is done is to grind all the surfaces down so they're clean and have a good scratch to them.

    Down load the "user's guides" from www.westsystem.com and www.systemthree.com as these will cover the basic materials, step and methods for mixing, adding fillers, etc.

    Make sure the core is well tabbed back into the hull shell, at least several inches. This is where the strength comes in.

    Once everything is in, coat all surfaces with a few sealing coats of straight epoxy. This locks down these surfaces, making them water proof in prep for paint.

    The skins is the actual 'glass surrounding the plywood or other wooden element. In a typical transom core replacement, one of the "skins" is removed (outside or inside), which offers access to the inside of the transom. This skin is then reattached with thickened epoxy.

    It appears you have more then one thread going on this subject. It will be difficult to keep track of comments, suggestions, etc. Consider combining them.
     
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