need for storm covers on window for ocean cruising

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Flash Gordon, Aug 20, 2014.

  1. Flash Gordon
    Joined: Aug 2014
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    Location: Australia

    Flash Gordon Junior Member

    Hi, one of the minor annoyances with my vandestadt 34 is the pilot house window is a complete wrap around to give the impression of unrestricted forward viewing in the pilothouse. In fact the window cut outs are fairly conservative and the window is massively thick. it was professionally installed with a glueing compound over a fairly large area {no through bolts). I am told it is common to build modern boats using this method but i am nervous about serious storm damage on a glues window. it would be fairly easy to install a moulded ply storm cover with protective pads over the whole window and securing with throughbolted handrails and easy after storm damage to plug the conservative window cutouts with ply. However, if others have had no problem with the window installation method i might reduce the priority of this project? thanks for any input.
     
  2. Ad Hoc
    Joined: Oct 2008
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    Location: Japan

    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    It all depends on the installation.

    Glued in windows have been used for 20 years on fast ferries, all without a hitch. Main reason is the standards that they must comply with, i.e. Class rules. Hence, if you can find out how it was installed, any previous testing to justify the methodology/arrangement and if surveyed/witnessed. If all ok...it will be as strong as if bolted through.
     
  3. Flash Gordon
    Joined: Aug 2014
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    Location: Australia

    Flash Gordon Junior Member

    thanks the surveyor examined thoroughly {i was paranoid} and his conclusions (fully seaworthy) and inquiry with builder suggest it was done to industry standard. But can never be certain! hence the trepidation thanks again very helpful!
     
  4. FAST FRED
    Joined: Oct 2002
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    Location: Conn in summers , Ortona FL in winter , with big d

    FAST FRED Senior Member

    I would surely carry a plan B , should the sperts be in error.
     
  5. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    I haven't seen many motorsailors that didn't require some sort of storm light and port covers. The exposed glass is just too big, for serious off shore passage making. I've seen stoved in well fixed lights, busted right out on the best equipped and built yachts, so the cheap insurance, particularly with today's weather forecasting, provided by a good set of covers, just makes way too much sense. Yeah, they'll lay in a locker 99.99% of their lives, but the day you need them, you'll really need them.
     

  6. Flash Gordon
    Joined: Aug 2014
    Posts: 14
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    Location: Australia

    Flash Gordon Junior Member

    Storm Covers

    Thanks, you have convinced me. I suspected I would need a board to cover the large wrap around forward facing pilot window and designed a system, but hoped I could skimp on the side windows (very excessively heavy plexi?? and is well braced and only a little bigger than conventional windows). I will now fit a similar system (wedged plates under strong through bolted handrails) to the side windows. I have only used storm batterns once and forgot how scary the incident was (wont bother you with details). Thanks again.
     
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