Need fast, EFFICIENT, commuter boat

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by MattM, Aug 26, 2004.

  1. YankeeBoater
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    YankeeBoater Junior Member

    The Aussies by the way, take even the little Quinnies into some big water ;-). I think the little 140 Estuary Angler, with 30-40HP to motivate her, the windshield to keep out spray and a bimini overhead to shield you from those rainy Oregon autumn days... would work out great right from the factory.
     
  2. RThompson
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    RThompson Senior Member

    You may want to have a look at Craig Loomes wave peicing tri's

    http://www.cld.co.nz/welcome.htm

    Goto: design portfolio/Wavepeicer Tri's/6m test model.

    There's video of it somewhere making 25-30kt's through reasonable swell with barely a nod to the waves. through not over them.

    Rob
     
  3. D'ARTOIS
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    D'ARTOIS Senior Member

    The only solution where speed and distance can be combinedis using a W.I.G.E. kind of boat.
    We have discussed this before in the Forum and I think that pictures are still there. I have no pictures right at hand but there are plenty examples of low HP and high speed.
    The only biut is that a WIGE needs pretty flat water to operate on it's top speed. I don't know the area but waves higher that 0.50 mtr will make the flight
    uncomfortable.
    On the other hand, with a 28 hp engine a top speed of 60-70 knots is not impossible.

    Just to give an idea.
     
  4. YankeeBoater
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    YankeeBoater Junior Member

    Hmmm

    Hmmm - interesting to say the least - that is different alright. Very impressive - what he's been able to achieve at a technical level, and yet, in my opinion, he won't sell many of these. The hull is very narrow, and the passenger-accessible area is completely enclosed with a thin band of glass to see outside. There really is no external deck to speak of. That's not a recipe for success for pleasure boating, commercial or sport fishing, skiing, tour-boating, or even rescue applications.

    While the outriggers must do a lot to keep the boat upright, if it ever pitchpoles or capsizes in the extreme conditions that I assume it's made for, they will also make it virtually impossible to right again.

    One thing I can imagine would be good on this boat is ride in rough water - if it travels more on a horizontal line through waves rather than over them, that should improve comfort in rough conditions.

    Finally, I can't imagine a custom boat like this will be real cheap. I am not in the market for an extreme conditions type boat, but if I was, I'd rather have something like a Coast Guard Lifeboat. It's fully enclosed like the Wave-Piercer, but is self-righting and has a large interior space for people as well as usable outside decks, and is a well proven practical design.

    I have to wonder what the target customer profile is for that boat? :confused:
     
  5. marshmat
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    marshmat Senior Member

    I'm rather tempted by the hydrofoil idea. Foil-assisted cats might be something to look at as Greg suggests. Long, thin monohull shapes (length/beam on the order of 5/1 or more) might also have something to offer. But I do think that your combined goals of speed, economy and rough-water performance are going to be exceedingly difficult to meet.
     
  6. yokebutt
    Joined: Aug 2004
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    yokebutt Boatbuilder

    Matt,

    How about a carbon fiber catamaran with hydrofoils? You could even hang a long-tail propulsion unit between the hulls with a large surface-piercing prop to make it efficient. Go talk to Steve Rander, he's just down the creek from your place.

    Yoke.
     
  7. RThompson
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    RThompson Senior Member

     
  8. Sean Herron
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    Sean Herron Senior Member

    What the...

    Hello..

    Here is a bit of strange from my head based on that Diogene bit...

    SH
     

    Attached Files:

  9. Redsky
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    Redsky Senior Member

  10. marshmat
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    marshmat Senior Member

    Looks like an old BF.109, with amas and an outboard... kewl :)
    I'd go with a different paint scheme myself....
    Sean, how would the stability be on that thing at speed, with all that lift in the stern?
     
  11. mark424x
    Joined: Feb 2006
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    mark424x Junior Member

    A couple thoughts.

    - some have mentioned the foil cat. There is a lightweight 6.5m RIB with the hysucat foil. There used to be an importer in Ventura, CA - but their website has been down for a long time. Try http://www.stealthyachts.com/ They pop up occasionally on the used market, but there weren't than many brought into the states. I think you'd get better efficiency with a single outboard. I have no idea how this compares with the jetski.

    - If the jet ski is close to working - get a newer 4 stroke quiet ski. I know it's cold, but get yourself foul weather gear, some fleece, and a helmet. That will be cheaper and lighter than a fiberglass cockpit to sit in - think of it as riding a motorcycle.

    Whatever you do, you have to keep the weight and drag to an absolute minimum.
     
  12. jonr
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    jonr Senior Member

    Sounds like what you want is a seaplane. A "light sport" license is easier to get and you will get great mileage and speed.
     
  13. blackdaisies
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    blackdaisies Senior Member

    I'm researching the swath boats that have boasted 60 percent more fuel efficiency, plus they are faster and stable on rougher waters. Somewhere out there, there is a webpage that for what ever reason I can't find again of a man building a small 10 or 15 foot swath with thin tubes as his pontoons. It looked to be about 4 feet wide at the most. The tubes are rounded or pointed slightly and a small platform built between them.

    Swaths are just under water pontoon boats and because the pontoons are already under water, there is no wave resistance to them. The pontoons have a thin wall, or in the small swath's plans a thick piece of metal running horizontal across the pontoons about double the length of width of the pontoon, and the platform is attached to the wall.

    http://www.unols.org/publications/manuals/SBCompendium/11SWATH.pdf

    Hope that might help.
     
  14. blackdaisies
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    blackdaisies Senior Member


  15. eponodyne
    Joined: Aug 2007
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    eponodyne Senior Member

    I'm so glad somebody bumped this thread.

    SEAN, GET THAT LITTLE BOAT BUILT!!!
     
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