need epoxy reccomendation

Discussion in 'Materials' started by vaporvette, May 19, 2011.

  1. vaporvette
    Joined: May 2011
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    vaporvette Junior Member

    I am looking for a thick foam like epoxy to hold some wood to fiberglass. The kind I have is too viscous and because the valley shape of the hull it wont build up high enough to make solid contact with all the wood. What kind of epoxy should I use that will fill a 2" gap? Thanks.
     
  2. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Most epoxies are not viscous enough is what you mean. This is because you have to add reinforcements, which we call fillers. There are several different materials you can add to epoxy to change it's physical properties, including making it thicker.

    A 2" gap should be filled with more then just thickened epoxy. Maybe cutting some hunks of wood will do, but the best advise you can get is to log onto the West System and System Three web sites and download their user guides. This will cover the various filler materials and many of the techniques.

    Can you provide a picture of the gap you're attempting to fill? If not a descriptive account of what you're trying to do would be helpful.
     
  3. vaporvette
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    vaporvette Junior Member

    Actually It's probably around a 1" gap now that I think about it. And thanks for correcting me on viscosity,that's two brain farts in one post :rolleyes:
    I don't have any pics tonight but will upload some soon. thanks
     
  4. vaporvette
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    vaporvette Junior Member

  5. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    The hardener you use depends on the temperature you'll be working in. Since it's summer, even in northern California, you'll probably want 206 or 209 to provide the working time necessary to apply the goo. 205 will kick off so fast you will not have time to apply it before it gels up.

    You're going to want both 403 and 406 in the thickened mixture. 403 is tiny little 'glass fibers, which will bond very well to the boat and 406 is silica which is a thickening agent, so you can control viscosity. Pour in 403 and mix until it's about like catchup, then add silica and mix until it's like peanut butter. This thick mixture can be packed in under the wood. It's important to also make "fillets" which are ramps of sorts around where the goo is stuffed. check out the user's guides to see how fillets are made.

    When the fillets are made, but still wet, apply some fabric over them with considerable overlap on the stringer and the hull shell (6" minimum). This will help tie everything together and make a strong bond. My fabric recommendation is 12 ounce, 45/45 biax, two layers thick at least.
     
  6. vaporvette
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    vaporvette Junior Member

    Here are a few pics of what I have,It's a very small amount of epoxy needed and was hoping for a cheap solution and not to have to buy a whole system of stuff.( I will be buying more fiberglass resin,will that work?)I am going to glue the two 2x1"'s to the floor and screw a battery tray onto them.

    gap(prob 3/4" max)
    [​IMG]

    2x1's
    [​IMG]

    batt. tray
    [​IMG]
     
  7. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    The cheap and lighter solution is to make a wood wedge to fill the gap.
     
  8. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Epoxy and for that matter polyester 'glassing operations are a system, not just a single product. It's like a bowl of cereal, without the milk it's just not going to work.

    It is possible to buy thickened epoxy from many of the major formulators, usually in a twin tube, cartridge format. Some can be used in a conventional caulking gun, some have their own. This can be convenient, but it's a much more costly way of getting thickened epoxy. They charge a lot for the packaging, the thickeners and the handiness.
     
  9. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    For filling voids and large gaps in non structural applications I use CHOCKFAST.

    Its Good for deep pours, up to two inches, without exotherm damage. Check with youre local marine engineering company....they use it to fit propshaft logs and engine mounts

    http://www.chockfast.com/itwproducts.html#Anchor-Chockfast-2821
     
  10. bntii
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    bntii Senior Member

    I use the Mas epoxies- also won't boil off if used in thick fills.
    Just mix with some thickener so it won't slump- wood flour, milled fibers, colloidal silica etc.
    Laying a bit of glass along the sides will act as a dam when putting in place to keep everything tidy.
     
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  11. BPGougeon
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    BPGougeon Junior Member

    Hello,

    Just to be upfront, I do want to say that I work for WEST SYSTEM. That said, we have an excellent solution to your problem: Six10. Six10 is a two part prethickened epoxy that comes in a standard size caulk tube that will fit in any ordinary caulk gun. This product comes out of the tube pre-measured, pre-thickened and pre-mixed. Six10 sells for about $20. You can learn more at www.westsystem.com under specialty epoxies. If you need assistance please call our tech staff toll free at 866-937-8797.

    Good Luck,

    Ben Gougeon
     
  12. vaporvette
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    vaporvette Junior Member

    Thanks Ben, I saw that stuff and watched the promo video for it and they didn't use any or even crack it open to show the viscosity. A smaller tube would be nice too.
     
  13. BPGougeon
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    BPGougeon Junior Member

    The epoxy comes out very thick. If applied to a vertical surface it will not run or slump at all. The nice thing about six10 is the tube is filled under vacuum so there is no air in the mixture. When mixing epoxy and fillers manually its almost impossible to mix them with out incorporating some air.
     
  14. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Well, hello Ben, welcome to the forum. It's nice to see the next generation in the family business. So, what do they mean when they call you the "special projects guy"?
     

  15. BPGougeon
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    BPGougeon Junior Member

    I actually work in the marketing department. I think "Special projects guy" was a nice way of saying "This guy is supposed to be in his office, but is always in the boat shop building stuff."
     
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