need 40-65' tugboat plans.

Discussion in 'Boatbuilding' started by SRSS, Aug 16, 2011.

  1. SRSS
    Joined: Aug 2011
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    SRSS Junior Member

    Anyone know where i could get some 40-65' tugboat plans? nothing too modern I'm probable going to be using steam power and a big single prop, steel hull, Its going to be used for personal use but i wouldn't rule out making some money with it doing some towing or salvage work... also might add I'm going to be using this ship in the great lakes too!!
     
  2. Quatsino Boater
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    Quatsino Boater Junior Member

    if you're serious here is a Canadian Naval Architect firm who specializes in marine transportation including tugs for near and offshore work. Robert Allan LTD. These guys have at least 10 different classes of tugs and literally have hundreds of tugs world wide under their belt.

    Link http://www.ral.ca/

    tugboat specific link http://www.ral.ca/designs/tugboats.html
     
  3. SRSS
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    SRSS Junior Member

    wow those are some nice tug's!! I don't think they are the kind of DIY kind of tugs i was looking for in a build though, little bit to modern, and probable way out of my budget range lol. I was also planing on using steam power too!!
     
  4. Submarine Tom

    Submarine Tom Previous Member

    You may want to mention these details (and more) in your original post...

    -Tom
     
  5. Tad
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    Tad Boat Designer

    SRSS....

    You need to fill out your question a bit....you know...get people interested.....

    What are you going to tow? Where? How much power do you intend on installing? What is the engine (I assume you are building that as well?)? What material and construction method do you intend on using?
     
  6. Tad
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    Tad Boat Designer

    I'll assume you are thinking of something like this......

    2e98ae50.jpg
     
  7. SRSS
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    SRSS Junior Member

    Yeah i updated my original question thanks for the tips!

    Yeah something like that nice cutter bow and fantail stern classic tugboat lines :D. I'v seen lots of small tug plans of that style floating around the net like that but none of the big ones!!
     
  8. Tad
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    Tad Boat Designer

    This is a hybrid yacht/tug....she looks pretty much like a WestCoast log tower but is lighter and has shallower draft than a real tug.

    Tug44.jpg
     
  9. SRSS
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    SRSS Junior Member

    do you have any more info on this tug?
     
  10. Tad
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    Tad Boat Designer

    See the arrangement below......The lower deck is divided by 3 watertight bulkheads, lazerette aft, engine room midships, and foc'sl with 4 berths and head forward. On the main deck there is a pilothouse forward with two high seats, next aft is an entrance lobby on starboard with skipper's cabin to port, small deck head also on port, and galley with dining area aft. The afterdeck has the towpost forward and room for deck chairs , etc....

    Tug44arrang.jpg
     
  11. BATAAN
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    BATAAN Senior Member

    Tad, nice boat! What's the power, fuel consumption and top/cruising speeds?
     
  12. Tad
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    Tad Boat Designer

    Bataan,

    Today new 50' log-towers have 1000 HP, 20'+ of beam, draw 10.5' of water, carry 9000 gallons (imp.) of fuel, and turn twin 68" props in nozzles with 4.5:1 reduction gears. 30 years ago a tug this size would have had a 12v-71 (400HP) with 4:1 reduction turning a 52" prop........

    This is not a "real" tug and with the designed draft and keel has room for a maximum prop diameter of about 42-44".... A 6-71 (180HP) with 3.5 :1 reduction will turn a 38" dia. prop, push her at cruising speed of 8knots, and probably get her up to maximum speed of 8.5 Knots.....As you can't currently buy a new 6-71, I would look at John Deere, but this boat could easily handle far larger and heavier engines....Cat 343's are available cheap these days and are a great engine....

    8 knots cruising will require about 130HP and 6.25gph, but 7 knots is only 50Hp and 2.5 gph.......
     
  13. FMS
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    FMS Senior Member

    If Tad had not posted such a beautiful and appropriate design already, I would have suggested looking through the Boats & Harbors classifieds at old small tugboats to repurpose http://www.boats-and-harbors.com/
     
  14. Tad
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    Tad Boat Designer

    The trouble with old tug hulls (if you can find one that's not totally rusted out) is the volume is gigantic to carry the huge machinery and tankage that was required back in the day....substituting smaller machinery and tankage will require a large ballast addition, and why haul ballast everywhere you go?

    GovRose.jpg
     

  15. BATAAN
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    BATAAN Senior Member

    Have to agree with TAD here. This tug was originally steam and over the 121 years she has been afloat has been fitted with lighter and lighter engines, until the bilge is full of many tons of heavy old broken iron castings to keep her near her lines.
    In the early days of motor tugs, some were long and lean and have been successfully converted to sail with acceptable results, but still make mediocre motor yachts.
     

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