Naval architecture by distance learning.

Discussion in 'Education' started by Damian3716, Feb 4, 2014.

  1. Damian3716
    Joined: Jun 2007
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    Damian3716 Junior Member

    Hi, can anybody tell me if there is a school/university out there that does a naval architecture degree by distance learning. I'd love to fulfill a dream that I was too young and stupid to follow when I was 18, but as I now have a family to support, leaving work and attending a conventional university is out of the questions.
    I have done quite lot of online research about this and there has been the odd course mentioned on various sites and forums but they all seem to.be wild goose chases so far. I'm not too hopeful that there's anything out there for me but I know if there is, you're the guys to ask.
    Thank you in advance.
     
  2. Ad Hoc
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    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    Damien,

    A degree level distance learning is not common, most are "diplomas", or basic "introduction" type courses.

    I know Southampton Uni is about too, or now has, set up distance learning degrees. It may be worth contacting them, if you haven't done so already Same for UCL. With these being in the UK too, a visit may be once or twice a year would not be out of the question too if you need to "pop" over to their campus for some hands on tutoring etc.

    Just a thought..
     
  3. Damian3716
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    Damian3716 Junior Member

    Thanks for the suggestion Ad Hoc. Ive looked at the websites and I'm pretty sure mither does naval architecture by distance learning. I've also checked the RINA website and can't see any courses on their list that are distance learning. I think I'll have to resign myself to the fact that naval architecture degrees just can't be achieved by this method. There is always Westlawn, though.
     
  4. DCockey
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    DCockey Senior Member

    If you have an appropriate engineering or scientific degree MTEC has a distant learning program which can result in a Master of Science degree in Marine Technology from Newcastle University, University of Southampton or University of Strathclyde. http://www.mtec.ac.uk/index.html "Streams" include Naval Architecture, Small Craft Design, Offshore Engineering, and Marine Engineering.
     
  5. Damian3716
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    Damian3716 Junior Member

    Unfortunately I don't have a degree. Like I said, I was young and stupid and already knew everything so decided I didn't need to go to university...hind sight's a wonderful thing eh?
     
  6. The Loftsman
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    The Loftsman The Loftsman

    Hindsight!

    Hi Damian,
    It is one of these things for sure when you kind of miss the boat, and as far as I am aware most if they do offer courses will want you to already have some kind of degree to start with although just how much store is put on them today is a matter for conjecture, good luck in your search and we were all young and stupid at some time.

    Cheers



     
  7. Damian3716
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    Damian3716 Junior Member

    You're right there Loftsman. At least in that sense I'm not alone.
    Westlawn it is I think. Plenty to get my teeth in to.
     
  8. Alik
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    Alik Senior Member

    'Naval architecture' at school where not a single naval architect (with recognized degree) is teaching?? Not possible.
     
  9. Damian3716
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    Damian3716 Junior Member

    Who said it was? If I study with them it will be in place of a degree course. Thanks for the mini lecture though, very helpful.
     
  10. dgerr
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    dgerr Senior Member

    Westlawn Institute has trained more practicing small-craft naval architects than any other school in the world. It is exactly the kind of training suited to a person who wants to study part time from their home. Though Westlawn teaches small-craft naval architecture (vessels under 60 meters, 200 ft.), many of our alumni end up working on much larger craft such as the management of cruise ship repairs and modifications:
    http://www.westlawn.edu/news/Masthead28/index.html

    Or the management of 281-foot motoryacht projects:
    http://www.westlawn.edu/news/Masthead19/index.html

    Or being the project engineer in charge of a team of engineers involved in U.S. Navy shipbuilding, as well as polar tankers and articulated barges.
    http://www.westlawn.edu/news/index.asp?displayfile=Reiher.htm

    To quote our graduate in charge of other engineers in ship-design work:

    “As a Project Engineer, I supervise a staff of designers who have attended various institutions. None match the background and depth I got from Westlawn. I would like to find Westlawn students interested in ship interiors, outfitting, and/or HVAC to employ here at Jamestown.

    Has my Westlawn training been useful?

    Yes, worth every penny, every hour of extra effort.”​

    Graduates have also had long and successful careers running their own design firms, often specializing largely in commercial vessels, such as:
    http://www.westlawn.edu/news/Masthead22/index.html#/14/

    Others alumni have founded their own major boatbuilding firms, such as Rod Johnstone founder a chief naval architect of J-Boats:
    http://www.westlawn.edu/gallery/alumni_gallery.asp?userid=9

    And Gerry Douglas president and chief naval architect of Catalina Yachts:
    http://www.westlawn.edu/news/Masthead16/index.html

    This is only a tiny fraction of the successful Westlawn-Institute alumni working in the boating industry. See:

    Success Stories:
    http://www.westlawn.edu/who/success.asp

    Testimonials:
    http://www.westlawn.edu/who/testimonials.asp

    Alumni Design Gallery:
    http://www.westlawn.edu/gallery/gallery.asp

    Of course, be sure to read the back issues of Westlawn’s online quarterly technical journal, The Masthead:

    http://www.westlawn.edu/news/index.asp#Newsletter

    There are a couple of people on this forum who say negative things about Westlawn, but the facts speak for themselves. Don’t let a few naysayers keep you from following your dreams as hundreds of successful Westlawn alumni have already done.

    Dave Gerr, CEng FRINA
    Director
    Westlawn Institute of Marine Technology
    http://www.westlawn.edu/
     
  11. Baltic Bandit

    Baltic Bandit Previous Member

    Right but westlawn is not a degree program
     
  12. Damian3716
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    Damian3716 Junior Member

    thanks for the advice and encouragement, Dave. I have done my research on Westlawn and have emailed a question or two and have pretty much made up my mind to enroll as soon as my finances allow. It seems that sone people may have misread my previous and thought I said I was young and stupid now.
    I asked advice on any naval architrcture courses that members may know of. I did not ask for opinions on Westlawn's credentials, which, incidentally, happen to be pretty damn good. I know full well that it is not a degree course and never suggested it was. What I said was that I was considering studying with them as it seems that I have missed the boat on completing a naval architecture degree. To be perfectly honest, even if I did find a distance learning degree course, I wouldn't necessarily decide to enroll on that rather than the Westlawn course.
    To those who have offered genuine advice, thank you. To those who have used my post to put down what is clearly a very professional organisation and made no attempt to answer the question I posted....never mind
     
  13. Alik
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    Alik Senior Member

    Dave, we understand the position of Your school in the industry and it looks impressive until You start making dubious/incorrect statements. I understand this is for marketing, but being a marine professional requires some respect to the colleagues and Your perspective students.

    This is often repeated but not supported by any figures. There are schools like Southampton Uni teaching small craft design. There are schools in Russia and Ukraine, working from 1970s and some courses exist since 1930s with their graduates working in small and high speed craft design; these guys designed all that hydrofoil/WIG craft and naval small craft! Then, there is a small craft course in Istanbul Uni that is quite old. Then, there are schools in China having hundreds of small and high speed craft grads every year - have You ever been there, have You seen their textbooks? And there are much more; there is one boatbuilding school in here Thailand that is very old and they teach traditional boat design for decades, also marine electrical and engines, etc. All these guys work in the small craft industry! So I do have doubts that Your statement is correct; Westlawn with its one and half instructors can't simply compare with level of tuition in the establishments I mentioned.

    As to 'small craft naval architecture', this is another unsupported claim You often use on the forum. Note, 'naval architecture' is not written in any Westlawn's diploma and not mentioned on its website, because the use of title naval architect in most of jurisdictions is regulated by law. But on the forum You use it unofficially - as unlikely to have any legal issues.

    Important is that naval architecture can not be taught by someone having no degree in naval architecture - exactly Your case.

    So be correct with Your statements and good luck!
     
  14. FMS
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    FMS Senior Member

    Please provide the names of these schools in Russia, Ukraine, Thailand, and China.

    In the absence of numerical graduation & employment figures, Damian can compare the list of recognized alumni and employers who have employed these school's graduates and determine what is most congruous with his personal goals.
     

  15. Alik
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    Alik Senior Member

    OK, You can start Your checking from National University of Shipbuilding in Nioklaev, Ukraine - they have small craft course for decades.

    But this is not the point.The point is that Westlawn is repeatedly using some unsupported statements for their marketing, and this is really disappointing.
     
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