names or types of work skiffs ? (panga, downeast, chesapeake, seine, etc.)

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by lobsterman, Mar 26, 2015.

  1. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Don't do that, AnthonyW, I want to see what the "saffers" are up to ! :D
     
  2. AnthonyW
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    AnthonyW Senior Member

    Apologies!
     
  3. AnthonyW
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    AnthonyW Senior Member

    In the interests of being less grumpy - will add some SA local working boats people use for crayfish fishing - sort of 'skiff' ish.
     
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  4. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    I'd like to know the history of the "ski" boats ( power cats), particularly the timeline as to when they came into vogue over there.
     
  5. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    This is a GRP boat ( "Hooker Dory") that has found favour with "trout" fishermen on the Great Barrier Reef. The trout in this case is a prized market fish, the Coral Trout (Plectropomus leopardus). The typical operation has a 'mother ship' (not really that big to warrant the term 'ship') and a number of these 'dories' which fan out over reasonably long distances, before returning with their catch, which may be held in tanks live for a lucrative Asian market, or iced or frozen for other markets. These boats are actually deep-vees, which may not be ideal for drift line fishing stability-wise, but offers a more tolerable ride through the frequently choppy waters, over distances that would be wearing in lighter, flatter-bottomed alloy boats. They are sometimes seen being driven standing up with an extension on the outboard tiller arm, probably to navigate better around reef patches and breaks. I think it likely that the distances being covered in search of productive fishing, is what has made them preferable to the quite seaworthy, but harder-riding alloy boats. And the trade winds are pretty constantly blowing out there. But at 5 metres, it is a small boat in a big sea.
     

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  6. waikikin
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    waikikin Senior Member

    I'm sure you're correct, launches can be largish, putters were known as launches where I grew up, skiff implied sailing as in Twelves, sixteens & eighteens. That's the cool thing around language, Boats & ships, the transport of people & the referencing of other cultures words & meanings with adaptations were enabled by the craft & craftsmen that built & sailed them to others shores.......

    I've just picked up some ply, have most of the frames glued up for a boat that was designed for Timorese by a bloke in New Zealand... I'm not sure what he calls it besides trover but I'm calling it a utility skiff for my own purposes because it'll carry some weight but not be too heavy or big, I'm planning to use as a tender/commuter boat to get to my yacht with that I can trailer with gear already loaded in it from home, as a small work/push boat, an inshore fishing craft, a snorkel/dive boat.. pretty much like a box trailer/ute/"pick up" with some nice juicy fendering. Maybe I'll call it a skiff utility vessel....

    Jeff
     
  7. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

  8. waikikin
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    waikikin Senior Member

    That's the one.

    "Trover"


    For the list,
    It's constant in section from midships back & can be lengthened to around 6m or shortened to 3.6, I'm building to plan but dont like the detailing around the outboard cutaway & might stretch the longti seats to full length of boat, once it's done(could be a while) I'll see how it goes, my Dads got an old 6hp but i'm thinking 10-15 hp four stroke, just depends on what turn$ up. My youngest Son is giving me a hand with it.
    Jeff
     
  9. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Looks like it might be tippy in the light condition.
     
  10. lobsterman
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    lobsterman Junior Member

  11. Pericles
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    Pericles Senior Member

  12. boatbuilder41
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    boatbuilder41 Senior Member

    there were many boats similar to this boat built by tremblay.. they were purpose built boats often used for commercial fishing in shallow water. sheffield and chiefland boats were similar in apperance . these boats can operate in just inches of water. when run at certain speeds ....normallyabout 1/3 throttle... the boat will push a swell ahead of the boat. then with a little getting usef to. you can climb on to the swell and the lower unit of the outboard motor will actually be riding in this swell of water being pushed ahead of it making a super shallow water boat. i have actually run this type of boat with the stern of it bumping the bottom and the prop never touching bottom. many were built by fisherman themselves. power trim has the opposite effect on these boats.. it takes some getting used to... but it is a great boat for its purpose... a work boat for sure
     
  13. boatbuilder41
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    boatbuilder41 Senior Member

    for some odd reason i could not get my pic to upload
     
  14. AnthonyW
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    AnthonyW Senior Member

    South African West coast boats

    For interest. Used for crayfishing etc. Called 'Bakkies' here.

    Then again we allso call pick-up trucks 'Bakkies' here. (Means small recepticle)
     

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  15. AnthonyW
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    AnthonyW Senior Member

    And more modern incarnations....

    West coats crayfish boats (Kreef bakkies). Operate typically off the West coast - waters not very sheltered, and many local fisherman can't swim. Most drop crayfish traps, but some line fish from them. Fairly small and vulnerable, and to address this the South African regulations for flotation requirements has been dramatically increased.
     

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