NA at Memorial University?

Discussion in 'Education' started by H_sailor, Feb 4, 2007.

  1. H_sailor
    Joined: Jan 2007
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    H_sailor New Member

    Hi,
    I'm currently in a Mech Eng diploma program and would like to go into Naval Architecture after I finish. I would like to go Memorial University in Newfoundland and was wondering if there are any people that have or are going through their NA program?
    What did you think of the program? What is the difference between the Marine institutes Bachelor of NA compared to Memorials degree of NA? How is this program regarded in the industry?
    Thanks
    Seamus
     
  2. DavidJ
    Joined: Jun 2004
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    DavidJ Senior Member

    First off the Marine Institute program is a diploma program, not a bachelor.
    Having said that they are currently talking of revising the program to make it a degree and a diploma(like Lakehead University or the Marine Institutes Ocean Instrumentation program). Also graduates have the option of making it into a bachelor of technology with an additional year. That option only adds arts classes and Business things so it doesn't actually make a better Naval Architect, but it could be useful for gov't work.

    The Memorial Program on the other hand leads to an engineering degree. So, like other engineering programs you would be eligible to write your Peng exam after some time in industry(I do know of at least one graduate of MI's program that has a Peng, but you have to work longer). The Memorial program has mandatory COOP with workterms alternating between school semesters. So this time is reduced from other programs, however, the program itself takes longer.

    I don't have much information about Memorial's program. I have been told that its main focus is ocean engineering, such as offshore stuctures and not as much ships, could be wrong though.
     
  3. DavidJ
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    DavidJ Senior Member

    I am currently in the second year(of three) of the Marine Institutes Naval Architecture program. The program is fairly small and it has a high failure rate. It isn't hard academically, but it is very intense. Last year they only graduated 4 students, this years final class currently has near 20. My class started with 14 and we are already down to 11. Of those 11 we have 3 students who actually started at Memorial. They all switched for different reasons but the main thing was the difference between the schools. Memorial is engineering, Marine Institute is applied Naval Architecture. Memorial is theory, MI is practical. Students at Memorial don't see a boat or ship until at least 3rd year, while at MI everything we do is about ships.

    Having said all that the program is very highly respected in industry and there is a lot of demand for NA's these days. I don't think anyone has trouble finding work. I started sending out resumes for summer work at the beginning of January and a week later I had a job. The first two places that got my resume were interested. I wasn't even interviewed.

    Most graduates head to the gulf of Mexico because demand is high and so is the pay. One student who failed last year found work at a shipyard in Alabama. He is back here to finish the program now and he told us that the first week he arrived there he got five offers to go to Texas. 40 dollars an hour is a rate I hear a lot and you can work as many hours as you want. 80 to 100 grand a year is not impossible for a new grad. There are many grads working in BC and Washington state, though the money wouldn't be nearly as good. 97% of Transport Canada's safety inspectors are grads of the MI program.

    Where you want to go all depends on what you want to do. If you want to be an engineer, then get an engineering degree. If you want to be a Naval Architect, the Marine Institute is a better avenue. If you are only interested in small boats and yachts I would recommend Westlawn or the Landing school, both would be cheaper in the long run and they cover more yacht type stuff.

    Memorial produces engineers. Since you are already working on a mech. dipl. I would recommend doing one of the bridging programs to a school to get a mechanical engineering degree instead of starting over to go to Memorial. Then just look for work experience at shipyards and design offices. Since there are so few schools with Naval Architecture programs, companies invariably end up hiring many mechanical engineers.
     
  4. H_sailor
    Joined: Jan 2007
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    H_sailor New Member

    Thanks for getting back to me David. I was wondering what the Bachelor of Tech actually was. I understand the drop out rate we lost 50% in our first year.
    I am more interested in design of yachts specifically sailboats. The end goal would be to work at a design firm or start one that focused on the racing scene or any designs pushing the boundaries.
    You say that at MI you get into boats earlier, do you get to use the tank at Memorial for testing models?
    I thought of going to UBC to finish my degree and specializing in fluid dynamics, but wasn't sure if that would give me the right skills for design of yachts.
    Thanks Again
    Seamus
     
  5. DavidJ
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    DavidJ Senior Member

    With a diploma in Mechanical engineering you would be just as qualified to take the bachelor of technology. Actually somebody with a nursing diploma can take it.

    Yes we do get to use the tow tank at Memorial. We use it a bit in second year when we learn how to gather test data. Then again in third year as part of a composite class we build a model and then test it.

    I have a friend who did the mechanical engineering fluids option at UBC and he works at the large tow tank here. Once again, he is an engineer, not a naval architect. The UBC program would be fairly similar to MUN's and would be just as good an option(especially if you could do it quicker).

    I really don't think either program here would be ideal for doing cutting edge sailboat design. You can choose to do projects on sailboats and yachts, but neither program has much on them. Not that you couldn't get there from here, but you could get there from mechanical engineering to(or civil, or industrial design, or any of the other roundabout ways people get there). I think an engineering education combined with one of the yacht specific courses would be ideal.
     
  6. H_sailor
    Joined: Jan 2007
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    H_sailor New Member

    Thanks for the inside scoop. I have some more research to do, the landing school looks like it would be a good addition to my diploma and a lot quicker path.

    Thanks
    Seamus
    Highland Grad 05
     

  7. zeroname
    Joined: Oct 2008
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    zeroname Naval Architect

    hy

    Anyone can write about the MEng program in NA at Memorial university, canada? i see its for 2 years program and Research Based program. I will finish my Bachelor next year .. So need information for Msc/MEng program.
    someone please Discuss about the Education quality and future after finish Meng from Memorial university , obviously as Naval Architect.
     
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