my trimaran houseboat

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by playsa, Apr 7, 2015.

  1. SaugatuckWB
    Joined: Jan 2014
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    Location: Saugatuck,MI

    SaugatuckWB Junior Member

    Here's what I've done for non-skid. Use oil based porch paint (or any gloss exterior oil based for metal, pipes, industrial use).Tape off around the edges of the deck and any hardware. Apply a coat of paint to the whole surface and then sprinkle sand on it until it is completely covered, like 2mm deep. Let it dry. Sweep, blow and vacuum off the excess sand and then give it another one or two coats of paint.

    This is very durable and gives a nice comfortable grip. You can paint it a couple more coats over the years before the sand is covered with too much paint to give a good non skid surface.

    I think the key is good fine uniform sand. You cant have a bunch of large grains, shells, etc in it like you'd find on some beaches like in Florida or what you'd buy for concrete mix. I use Lake Michigan sand which is excellent quality, and free to anyone with a shovel around here. I sift it through a window screen, then wash it a couple times to float off any organic matter and let it dry. If there is a foundry nearby they will have good sand for molds.

    Latex paint on my tour boat decks has not held up as well as oil, not even remotely.

    This is as cheap as it gets and lasts about 5 years before repainting.
    I'd use light grey.
     
  2. Pericles
    Joined: Sep 2006
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    Location: Heights of High Wycombe, not far from River Thames

    Pericles Senior Member

    playsa,

    The information you seek is on the website for which I gave you the link. Here are links to some of the data sheets listed on the left of the two relevant pages. Compared to standard Protectakote the UVR version offers a greater tensile strength, significantly greater resistance to UV light and a 50% shorter drying time.

    http://www.protectakote.co.uk/protecta-kote-uvr.html

    http://www.protectakote.co.uk/downloads/uvr-product-info/view.html

    http://www.protectakote.co.uk/downloads/uvr-msds-/view.html

    http://www.protectakote.co.uk/protecta-kote-anti-slip-coating.html

    http://www.protectakote.co.uk/downloads/product-information/view.html

    http://www.protectakote.co.uk/downloads/protectakote-msds/view.html

    Good luck.

    SaugatuckWB,

    Here's a link from #7 covering the use of paint & sand & brown sugar!

    http://www.pbo.co.uk/gear/deck-paints-test-17514
     
  3. playsa
    Joined: Apr 2015
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    Location: constanta, romania

    playsa Junior Member

    how do you name this product of deck boat paint?
    the white paint with those little black heads?
    I have this on a little boat of mine, and I thought that I may use it on my trimaran houseboat
     

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  4. Pericles
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    Location: Heights of High Wycombe, not far from River Thames

    Pericles Senior Member

  5. playsa
    Joined: Apr 2015
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    Location: constanta, romania

    playsa Junior Member

    for me doesn't seems to be abrasive. it is like another paint over that white one, but they are combined somehow
     
  6. playsa
    Joined: Apr 2015
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    Location: constanta, romania

    playsa Junior Member

    In this moment on my houseboat I have pvc windows; they are heavy and ugly and I do not like them at all. So I have an offer from UK for this boat windows. And I am thinking to change them.
    but the problems might be: the new ones, considering they are not insulated, will I have trouble with them like the sweating glass?
    Because the PVC ones have double-glazed unit, and boat windows that I am trying to buy, they are single-pane windows.
     

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  7. Pericles
    Joined: Sep 2006
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    Location: Heights of High Wycombe, not far from River Thames

    Pericles Senior Member

    playsa,

    If you wish to use your house all through the year, the double glazed windows would be best. Single glazed windows are best for boats only used during the summer, when condensation of water vapour will not happen (if the summer is hot :D). You might not like your existing windows, but I could live with them. :p Beers & BBQs will make anything look good.
     
  8. playsa
    Joined: Apr 2015
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    Location: constanta, romania

    playsa Junior Member

    thank you Pericles.

    For the deck covering, I decided to use International Interdeck (I found it in Romania)
    I attached photos with my deck (made of Fiberglass), the lighter half is freshly washed.

    From the product information they say how to apply the coat on BARE GRP and GRP. What products are this? I searched on google but the results didnt enlightened me.
    http://www.yachtpaint.com/LiteratureCentre/Interdeck_GBR_ENG.pdf

    Before applying Interdeck, the seler recommended me to apply Pre Kote. Do I need the last one product or I can just apply Interdeck without any other problems?

    LE: sorry I forgot to upload the photos
     

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  9. Pericles
    Joined: Sep 2006
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    Pericles Senior Member

    GRP means Glass Reinforced Plastic, which you call Fiberglass. Bare means uncovered or stripped of previous coatings, including the gelcoat. Follow the Surface Preparations guide for your Fiberglass. Wash with Supercleaner or similar to remove oil, dirt & grease & allow to dry. Abrade (scrape or wear away by friction) with 3M or similar 180-220 grade paper. No primer necessary according to the INTERDECK instructions you linked to.
     
  10. playsa
    Joined: Apr 2015
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    Location: constanta, romania

    playsa Junior Member

    what wood would you use for kitchen furniture? also to be lighter and strong
     
  11. Pericles
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    Pericles Senior Member

  12. SamSam
    Joined: Feb 2005
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    Location: Coastal Georgia

    SamSam Senior Member

    [​IMG]

    Before painting the deck you should elevate the cleats with wood blocks covered in fiberglass or some other solution. As it is, the toe rail will cut into your mooring lines very easily and the toe rails will get all bent out of shape.

    Also, with the boat fenders/tires tied to the handrails, as shown on the bow (and I suppose the sides), when the boat works up and down at the dock or against anything else, like another boat, there is a very good chance the hand railings will also get all bent out of shape too. Best is to tie them to cleats, or at the very least tie them to the bottom of the handrail post, which is much sturdier. Again, you would have to make provisions so the toe rail won't cut the fender ropes.

    I just noticed this, sorry.
    That was just regular house paint, for painting outside decks on a house.
     
  13. playsa
    Joined: Apr 2015
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    Location: constanta, romania

    playsa Junior Member

    couple of days ago after I painted the half of my deck with Interdeck from International, I met some problems as you can see in the photo I attached
    The deck surface is not so flat as I expected to be, even after I abraded with 180 then with 240. So I still have those little cracks in the fiberglass that the coat didnt manage to cover them
    how can I solve this situation on the other half of my deck, to be perfect flat
     

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  14. SamSam
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    Location: Coastal Georgia

    SamSam Senior Member

    not sure what you're referring to. if there are actual cracks in the fiberglass, they have to be repaired.

    if you're referring to the small pits in the fiberglass mat, they should have been filled first and then the deck sanded and painted. you can probably still do that, but then you have to paint it again.

    if you're referring to the overall flatness of the deck, like humps where the honeycomb panels meet or where layers of glass overlap, you need to use a combination of filler and a long sanding board, repeat that pr5ocess a few times and then primer and paint.

    180-240 paper is way too fine a grit. use 80 or 120 grit. shining a light on the surface horizontally will show up imperfections easily. like when it's dark, lay a flashlight on the deck and then move it around. all the pits and bumps will show up as light and dark areas easily seen.
     

  15. playsa
    Joined: Apr 2015
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    Location: constanta, romania

    playsa Junior Member

    SamSam you gave me a nice answer.

    I attach again another pic of my deck, made with gopro, and you can see more clearly what I am talking about. So it is about those small pits in the fiberglass. You said they should have been filled first. With what can I fill them? What would be the most appropriate solution? Can I fill those small pits with resin?
     

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