My Design - Trifoglio 25' - Suggestions & Opinions

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by DVV, Nov 20, 2020.

  1. Doug Halsey
    Joined: Feb 2007
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    Location: California, USA

    Doug Halsey Senior Member

    Sure. Those photos I posted are all Moths (11' long). But I don't see anything wrong with larger ones (the ones with higher freeboard anyway). Here's a 20' scow that my uncle built & sailed frequently in the 1940's.
    As noted in other posts, scows are at their best when planing (usually not close-hauled), but many scows still perform nicely going to windward.
    I don't understand what you mean by this, but I don't think scows are any more difficult to sail than skiffs, generally speaking.
     
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  2. cracked_ribs
    Joined: Nov 2018
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    Location: Republic of Vancouver Island

    cracked_ribs Junior Member

    Pretty amazing that he built that in the 1940s. I would have guessed a few decades later, just because the overwhelming impression is that someone said "hey, what do you want to do with the Volvo 240 that has no engine or running gear?" and he responded, "well, there are vehicles that run without motors...how are we set for sailcloth?"
     
  3. Doug Halsey
    Joined: Feb 2007
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    Location: California, USA

    Doug Halsey Senior Member

    I've got absolutely no clue what you're saying.

    But, nevermind, I did some more digging into family history and it looks like he built the boat in 1939.
     
  4. cracked_ribs
    Joined: Nov 2018
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    Location: Republic of Vancouver Island

    cracked_ribs Junior Member

    It's just funny that this unique boat of 1939 looks so much like a 1980 sedan.

    It must have seemed incredibly futuristic at the time.
     
  5. DVV
    Joined: Nov 2020
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    Location: Italy

    DVV Junior Member

    This is a Colvin design, quite extreme, but I like it. Based on an old chinese junk (hanshaw bay fisher/trader). The bottom side of the bow seems to be curved (sides lower than center)

    zimage_0024.jpeg d3bb42bc1346a4234520ee26537c1d98.jpg
     
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  6. DVV
    Joined: Nov 2020
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    Location: Italy

    DVV Junior Member

    Update:
    Lots of work done. Added details, added dimensions and offsets.
    Almost ready to start building the balsa model, just need to design a Jig to use.
    Here some details of the internal structure.

    DVV Schermata 2020-12-18 alle 17.17.39.png Schermata 2020-12-18 alle 17.19.02.png
     
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  7. DVV
    Joined: Nov 2020
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    Location: Italy

    DVV Junior Member

    Schermata 2020-12-18 alle 17.58.53.png
     
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  8. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    Is 20 degrees where you have the highest righting moment or where you don't have any more positive stability?
     

  9. DVV
    Joined: Nov 2020
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    Location: Italy

    DVV Junior Member

    I hope that's where I have the highest righting moment. If it was where I dont have any more positive stability I'm afraid I would capsize the boat just by jumping into her! :)

    Anyway, it was wrong. Max GZ is at 40°, and AVS 126°.

    Maximal GZ : 0.686 m
    Heeling angle for GZ maximum : 40.0 degr
    Heeling angle at which righting lever=0 again : 126.2 degr

    I'm afraid that's a bit too much, I think I'll have to go back to add some weight or depth to the keel...

    EDIT: No. I think I over reacted. 40° is quite fine, I dont think I need to modify any keel, its fine like this.
     
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