My cruising centerboarder

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by Gvidon, Aug 16, 2019.

  1. Gvidon
    Joined: Jan 2019
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    Location: Los Angeles, CA USA

    Gvidon Junior Member

    Folks, I've arrived: I've retired from the military after having served for 27 years and I think I'm ready to realize my live's dream and spend some years living/cruising on a sailboat. My primary area of cruising interest is the Adriatic sea, the Mediterranean and the Black sea. I would like to invite forum's input as to my (preliminary) choice of the "dream" boat - Maurice Griffith's design Barbican 33. I know for sure that my dreamboat will be a shoal draft sailboat (not more than 4") Beyond that, it should be about 32"-36" so as to provide relatively comfortable liveaboard. It should be safe and sturdy and it should be within my budget - give or take $25K. I also looked at Tartan 34 CB and it is a very interesting boat. I know there are superior contemporary models, by Jeanneau, Shannon, Seahawk and Feelings, for example. But these are significantly beyond my budget. So, am I on the right track, am I missing something?
     
  2. Deering
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    Location: Juneau, Alaska

    Deering Senior Member

  3. Gvidon
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    Gvidon Junior Member

    Thanks for your response. I'll check out those forums. i understand that British boats are usually well built and Barbican 33 sure looks like a seaworthy sailboat.
     
  4. philSweet
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    Location: Beaufort, SC and H'ville, NC

    philSweet Senior Member

    Centerboarders are a pain as liveaboards because of the case. I'd get a decent keelboat. Why do you want 4' draft? That knocks out 99% of boats in your size and price brackets. Just go shopping based on price and don't worry about draft specs, you can work with that. I sail a 7' draft boat around the Bahamas. Seaworthy liveaboards aren't that common at that price, I'd just keep all options open at this point.

    There's a Mariah for sale on the left coast - 1977 Pacific Seacraft Mariah Sail Boat For Sale - www.yachtworld.com https://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1977/pacific-seacraft-mariah-3193090/?refSource=browse%20listing
     
  5. Gvidon
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    Gvidon Junior Member

    I mostly agree with you. Every boat is a compromise. As I stated in my initial post, I plan on sailing In European waters. Many years ago I had a chance to sail along the shore of what used to be Yugoslavia. The fact that that boat had a draft of only 4” helped a lot. Are you familiar with Barbican 33? It has a long keel and might be able to sail without the centerboard altogether.
     
  6. philSweet
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    philSweet Senior Member

    I am familiar with Griffith's work in general, but not that particular boat, and I have his book Dreamboats.
     
  7. Gvidon
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    Gvidon Junior Member

    What attracted me to this particular design were the long keel, generally sweet lines, the fact that this model was being built well into the 90's and that many Barbican 33 are available within my price range. There is nothing extreme about this boat and it seems like a very capable vessel. I was hoping to find folks here who were familiar with this model, perhaps even sailed on it themselves. I can just see myself in that comfy cockpit navigating around the Greek islands...
     
  8. JosephT
    Joined: Jun 2009
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    JosephT Senior Member

    I have not seen this particular boat before. It doesn't appear a lot of them were built. The boat review below raises some questions about its sailing performance to windward, which should not be taken lightly if you're trying to get some place. You may be doing more motor sailing than you anticipated. If you're Ok with that it doesn't seem too bad of a boat choice.

    "I tested this design in difficult conditions out of Plymouth when it was new. She lacked power for her displacement and had a tendency to hobbyhorse and go nowhere to windward in a lumpy sea.

    The accommodation was OK in a traditional way and reasonably well built."

    "I sailed one owned by a friend of mine in the Med. and concur with the others here. It was pretty awful in just about every respect I'm afraid. I won't say it was the worst boat I've 'sailed' in the last 38 years, but it comes very close. There are far better boats about for the same sort of money IMHO."

    Ref: Barbican 33 http://www.ybw.com/forums/showthread.php?52822-Barbican-33

    For a boat of the size & budget you might want to take a look at the Pearson 35. Definitely take into consideration the offshore handling capabilities and availability of parts.

    Ref: Pearson 35 boats for sale - YachtWorld https://www.yachtworld.com/boats/category/type/Pearson/35
     
  9. Gvidon
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    Gvidon Junior Member

    Funny that you would mention Pearson. I'm looking at Pearson 35 (traditional lines) and Pearson 36 (much more modern) even as we speak...BTW, Barbican 35 is also an interesting design even though it is not a centerboarer.
     
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  10. JosephT
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    JosephT Senior Member

    Another consideration is the electrical system. Bring from the US you'll have an easier time with onboard electronics & gear. If you buy one from UK or Europe you may run into comparability issues. Lots of good boats out there so take your time, size up all your requirements and pick the right one. Be sure to get a survey before buying. If you can find one with a shallow draft, good sailing performance, solidly built for offshore performance, and low hours on the engine & gear that's what you're looking for. I'm also a big fan of wooden interior trim and brass trim. To each his own. Happy shopping!
     
  11. Gvidon
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    Gvidon Junior Member

    You’re right - there are a lot of good and inexpensive boats here in the states. But my plan is to sail in European waters and I don’t think I would trust myself to cross the Atlantic Ocean to get to Europe at this time.
     
  12. JosephT
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    JosephT Senior Member

    Definitely read-up on your navigation charts for the area, plan your routes and polish them off by loading up the applicable Navionics apps on your portable tablet & smart phone. These apps sync up via Wifi to most newer chart plotters. Also, I recall sailing Europe requires an International Proficiency Certificate (ASA 104 equivalent). Just apply for it and they'll send it in the mail. Thus, highly recommend completing your ASA 101, 103 & 104 ratings be completed before you depart. If you've already made these plans sorry for the brain dump!

    https://asa.com/international-proficiency-certificate/

    I have sailed the North, Irish & Mediterranean seas, but have not yet sailed the Adriatic (Croatia, Italy). It's on my bucket list for the next year or so.
     
  13. Gvidon
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    Gvidon Junior Member

    I’ve heard (and read about it) that Turkish coast is a dreamland for sailing - beautiful, friendly and very inexpensive.
     
  14. JosephT
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    JosephT Senior Member

    Both Greek & Turkish coasts are great. Lots of islands in between too.
     

  15. Rumars
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    Rumars Senior Member

    It will be difficult to find what you want at that budget. For your future searches use "deriveur integral" as keyword. A little bit smaller than what you want would be a Gib'Sea 302 DI (only the DI version has a centreboard) and a little bit bigger the Trismus 37 ( TRISMUS Voilier de voyage http://trismus.populus.ch ).
    Links to current listings:
    Vente Gib Sea 302 DI occasion - Voilier Dériveur Intégral à Morbihan, France | Youboat FR https://www.youboat.com/fr/d/voilier/gib-sea/gib-sea-302-di/239953
    Vente Aluminium Et Technique Trismus 37 occasion - Voilier Cotre à sete, France | Youboat FR https://www.youboat.com/fr/d/voilier/aluminium-et-technique/trismus-37/179454

    If 25k is your total budget I would forget the centreboarders and go conventional fixed keel. Draft is not a problem, if you go to Croatia 90% of the sailboats will be fixed keel and the rest catamarans.
    How much budget do you actually have to buy and outfit the boat?
     
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