multitools

Discussion in 'Boatbuilding' started by whitepointer23, Jan 20, 2015.

  1. whitepointer23

    whitepointer23 Previous Member

    I think one of these would be terrific for cutting out sections of wood with out having to drill pilot holes. if anyone uses one I would like to know how good it is and what thickness it can handle. thanks.
     

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  2. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Buy a good one or you'll just be dealing with a hand shaker, but yep, use them pretty frequently for all sorts of stuff.
     
  3. whitepointer23

    whitepointer23 Previous Member

    Thanks for that. I will get a good brand.
     
  4. michael pierzga
    Joined: Dec 2008
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    Location: spain

    michael pierzga Senior Member

    Yah...like Par says get a good one. Cheap ones just buzz....kinda like cutting a piece of wood with an electric toothbrush.

    The gold standard is Fein, top quality very expensive.

    Ask your local tool supplier for alternatives. ive used a Bosch, it worked well. Im sure there are others.

    Also make sure the the accessories like cutting blades and sanding shoes are availble locally. Nothing worse that having to special order a new blade from china.
     
  5. waikikin
    Joined: Jan 2006
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    Location: Australia

    waikikin Senior Member

    I have a bosch for home. I resisted getting one for a bit... but soon woke up! At work we have Fiens, seem to be pretty good.
    Also you can buy a converter "nut?" from a tooling manufacturer that converts their blades to others, the nut is $1 & their blades cheaper.... I think I got mine from big W but haven't looked or seen one for a bit, maybe triton tools?
    Last used a fein on Monday, probably the only style of tool that could blind cut into jarrah in the time it took, on the bottom of this object there was no room hold a chisel let alone swing a mallet, you gotta try real hard to cut a finger off with one too...
    Jeff.
     
  6. SukiSolo
    Joined: Dec 2012
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    Location: Hampshire UK

    SukiSolo Senior Member

    Agree with both PAR and Michael. I have the Fein (German) and use it quite a lot. Good on wood and FRP/GRP repairs, it can get in where it is hard to get a hand tool. Good for roughing out a patch neatly, sanding a laminate back, removing a rotten wood core internally etc etc. There are a lot of good accesories for it including some carbon trimming stuff. Check the range of accessories. The OE metal/wood blades are actually fairly durable on glass so replacement is not too frequent, unless you hit a lot of S/S screws.... Also many sanding velcro pads of decent quality are quite cheap. It is possible to work with it for some hours without getting 'white finger'...;)

    I've tried the Worx and the Bosch, they work OK but not quite as smooth or neat in operation, ie tool change.

    As for thickness, I've chopped out a Mirror internal transom solid mahogany 22mm (7/8") but on a diagonal so longer. Through 38mm ply and glass on the back of a Dory outboard mount. Through 12mm solid glass/epoxy. Rarely work on solid 100mm thick timber stuff so haven't tested that...;) good round the house too for electrical sockets and cutting flush down the skirting board.

    You might need the grunt of a mains version btw, the lead is pretty long and flexible on the Fein so useful. It also packs back in the box pretty well too. Of course we have the 230v ones over here!, unlike our American cousins.
     
  7. whitepointer23

    whitepointer23 Previous Member

    38mm of ply is pretty good. Where i burnt my boat I want to stagger the replacement sections and I thought one these tools would be ideal . The topsides are oregon so not hard to cut.
     
  8. whitepointer23

    whitepointer23 Previous Member

    Jarrah is a good test. As much as I love jarrah being ex southwest w.a. it is a mongrel to work with.
     
  9. waikikin
    Joined: Jan 2006
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    Location: Australia

    waikikin Senior Member

    Ha, I was working on a boat we got(some say stole...) from over there, have to give a little reciprocating sweep in the cut............

    Jeff.
     
  10. whitepointer23

    whitepointer23 Previous Member

    I know a few people around albany that have heaps of jarrah stashed away for their retirement fund. ITs been hard to get since they cut all the quotas back.
     
  11. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    I have a Bosch, but the Rockwell F50 is a good one too, both being reasonably priced compared to the Fein, which is ridiculously priced. It's all about how many amps the motor has, the sweep of the oscillation and the speed of the oscillation. Get the one with the biggest motor, the widest sweep and most oscillations within you budget. I like the Rockwell because of the grip and tool free blade removal. I know lots like the cordless versions, but I've found these to be the weak kneed, redheaded step children of the corded versions.
     

  12. whitepointer23

    whitepointer23 Previous Member

    I had a look at some today. The makita had the biggest motor. I can get a fein on ebay for $226 which I thought was ok. This is a cord one. I don't want cordless.
     
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