Multihull Wave Piercing Power Boat

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Powerhouse, Apr 22, 2005.

  1. Powerhouse
    Joined: Apr 2005
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    Powerhouse New Member

    Hi Everyone,
    I would like to build an aluminium Powerboat 18-20ft that is maximum width for Towing, I also want something that looks spectacular. As yet I have been unable to find suitable plans and in fact can find very little on Wave piercing Multihulls. I don't want a Cat as they are generally expensive to run. What I would like is something based on the Australian Hydrofield (Jaguar, Fibreglass), this is basically a Monohull with very distinct and efficient "wings" giving you the choice of single or Multi Engines, Big forward storage for a Cabin, Soft riding Hull, extremely efficient for low fuel costs and an extremely stable working Platform. The wave piercing hull seems to be gathering momemtum and from what I understand gives a better rough water capability as it lengthens the Keel. The wings enable the boat to ride on the foam generated.

    My question is- Can someone direct me to a site or designer that can help me with my quest.

    Thanks
    Powerhouse
     
  2. mackid068
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    mackid068 Semi-Newbie Posts Often

    Hm. Wave piercing? All you need is a V-hull type powerboat with chines (B-whaler style hull).
     
  3. intrepid71
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    intrepid71 Junior Member

    I don't think wavepiercing multihull boats in the 18-20 ft range exist. I'm not sure the concept will scale down very well. At first I thought you were talking about a scaled down version of Incat's fast ferry shape. Your description of wings and riding on foam doesn't really follow. All wavepiercing cat designs I have seen have the main hull out of the water. If the main hull is in the water then it creates drag and is exposed to pounding from waves, so you gain no advatage. You might as well stick with a monohull shape in that case.
     
  4. Cian Groves
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    Cian Groves Junior Member

    Hi Powerhouse,
    Maybe you are thinking about an air rider tri hull, I know the designer is quite well know here in Australia. You can find more info on kits of these hulls on the following link: http://www.marinekits.com/catalogue.php?catid=1.

    Please note I am not an employee of this company.

    Cheers,
    Cian
     
  5. Eric Sponberg
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    Eric Sponberg Senior Member

    Contact my friend Roger Hatfield at www.goldcoastyachts.com in St. Croix, US Virgin Islands. Gold Coast has built some small wave-piercing ferries (smallest on their website is 39') and I have ridden on one of them. Pretty neat.

    Eric
     
  6. mackid068
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    mackid068 Semi-Newbie Posts Often

    I'm still confused by wave-piercing's meaning.
     
  7. intrepid71
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    intrepid71 Junior Member

    Wave-peicing means that the hull or hulls are designed to penetrate through waves rather than riding over them like a traditional hull. The idea being that this will reduce pitching, heaving and slamming accelerations. A wave-piecing hull typically will have a very fine entry and most importantly, will have limited buoyancy forward. In the case of a catamaran design, limiting the forward buoyancy means the the hulls will be slender and often protude well forward of the structure that connects them to the main body, giving them a needle shape. The link to Gold Coast Yachts earlier in the thread illustrates this shape well.
     
  8. brian eiland
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    brian eiland Senior Member

    Experimental Navy Hull

    There was an old experimental hull form that was worked on down here in Annapolis, and it had some association with the Naval Research Labs. It worked very well if I remember correctly. But I can't recall the name of the thing. I think it had a 'delta like' center hull of some sort.
     
  9. Powerhouse
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    Powerhouse New Member

    Powerhouse Multihull

    Thanks for your input, much appreciated
    David
     
  10. Cary
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    Cary Junior Member

    I remember having a chat about wave piercing monohulls back in 1972 with Sonny Levy. I came to the conclusion that if you want to go fast, then fly....fly...fly....
     
  11. intrepid71
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    intrepid71 Junior Member

    There is no question that "flying" is faster. Water produces far more drag than air. The problem is that what goes up must come down. A small boat launching off waves at high speed makes for a brutal and possibly dangerous ride.
     
  12. Cary
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    Cary Junior Member

    Poking holes in waves increases the possibility of swapping ends, flipping, and submarining. Not if the flying boat can hover, fly in surface effects and fly like an aerial sports car, it can also land on land. I know because I'm trying to get one developed.
     
  13. intrepid71
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    intrepid71 Junior Member

    Well, if you can build a boat that can hover, fly in ground effect and land on land, I say cool. You are talking about a technology jump that does make "wave-piercing" seem irrelevant. That said, a properly designed wave-piercer may offer some advantage for those with non-flying boats.

    Anyway, good luck with your project.
     
  14. Cary
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    Cary Junior Member

    Sonny and I were exchanging sketches in the Florida Room of the publisher of Southern Boating magazine way back in 1971-72. Volvo built a boat a few years that looked very similar to the sketches. I poked a hole in a wave in one of our 26' runabouts. Basically, it has to do with a sharp froward entry. Wave mechanics can be very tricky.
     

  15. DiverDown
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    DiverDown Junior Member

    Wig

    I've always thought it would be interesting to have an Ekranoplan/Wing In Ground motoryacht...imagine 200 knots..
     
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