Multihull One Design-ORMA 70

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by Doug Lord, Apr 26, 2010.

  1. oldsailor7
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    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    I just wish that Francis Herreshoff could see all this.
    I think it would make him feel very proud.

    Victor Tchetchet was reduced to tears when he saw a Kraken 40 in New York in 1969. What would he think of the Tris of today :?:
     
  2. Silver Raven
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    Silver Raven Senior Member

    gooday Paddy - Like you - I've spent a tad bit of time - on what I thought was - reasonably quick - in those times - very quick - - as to what 'L. Francis' - himself - would have thought - I can't even imagine to think - I know (maybe like others) - I would need at least 3 prs of diapers on - to even look at those magnificant machines. Imagine 30 kts to windward in 12 to 14 kts of breeze - BUGGER ME - I'd be wetting myself - - so "himself" the "Lord" of multihulls - would - I'd imagine be - sitting up on the windward aft wing - with the biggest grin - IN THE WHOLE WIDE WORLD - on his dial & Gawd - bless him & thank him for the ride he's taken us all on. WOW Thanks for mentioning his real & still here - presence ! ! I-WANNA-GO-SAILING-ON-1-OF-THEM ! ! !

    Ciao, james
     
  3. Corley
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  4. Gary Baigent
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    Gary Baigent Senior Member

    Pretty sure the commentator is Dutch, multi lingual though.
     
  5. Corley
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    Steve Ravussin's Race for Water MOD70 slowed last night the reason was daggerboard damage caused by an impact with a container the boat appears otherwise undamaged.

    story below:

    With the exception of Race For Water suffering from a damaged centreboard (as a result of a collision with a container last night), the four MOD70s are sailing within just a mile of each other! The pace is picking up despite the sea state that is growing and becoming more chaotic due to the Gulf Stream and and as the trimarans are propelled at at a further two knots of speed: 715 miles covered in the last 24, an average 29.79 knots ... For now the fleet hangs on to the front as the crews continue to swallow up the miles across the Atlantic at high speeds to reach the Scilly Isles.

    Latest video from the MOD70's

    http://bcove.me/zgpcte5e

    and on youtube

     
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2012
  6. Corley
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    Latest news updates from the Krys Ocean Race website:

    http://www.krys-oceanrace.com/en/

    Video on day 2 (in French)

    http://bcove.me/mcgqrxo9

    Here is the english version on youtube



    Living on the edge:


    Even the most battle hardened crews have been finding the very wet going and relentless high speeds tough as the MOD70 fleet devour the Atlantic miles en route for Brest. With winds of up to 35kts, it was the hours either side of midnight last night which saw the speeds again peak at well over 30 knots for sustained spells, making life exhausting for the five teams as they pushed the red line constantly.


    It was during these most demanding conditions that Yann Guichard and the crew of Spindrift Racing which includes Pascal Bidégorry – the skipper who set the current Atlantic record – slid inexorably into the race lead on their slightly more northerly routing.

    Through Monday Spindrift racing lead over Sébastien Josse’s young crew on Groupe Edmond de Rothschild and Michel Desjoyeaux’s FONCIA has climbed progressively. From 3.6 miles at 2200hrs UTC last night, by afternoon Spindrift were 23.1 miles ahead, still showing a speed which remains quicker than the next two boats.

    Managing the crew physically and mentally starts to be critical after the first 48 hours of racing. Adrenalin and sheer motivation will only fuel the crews for so long. All have reported how hard it is to snatch any kind of restful sleep. Guichard said early this morning that his crew had their first freeze dried meal since they left New York on Saturday morning (local time):
    “We got to eat properly until last night when we made our first freeze-dried meal: it is pretty rock and roll below! We have to keep our strength up and getting any sleep is proving to be quite difficult.” Guichard reported.

    Conditions were due to ease slightly as Monday rolls on, with the SW’ly breeze expected to drop back to a more manageable 25 kts and with it some of the sea state which at times has been quite problematic.

    Michel Desjoyeaux’s FONCIA remain firmly in touch, calculated at less than half a mile behind Groupe Edmond de Rothschild on the midday rankings, but had dropped a dozen miles during the afternoon.

    The fleet leaders had less than 2000 miles to sail to Brest with Spindrift reeling off an incredible 639.9 miles 24 hours run to 1300hrs UTC today.

    Forecasts suggest that the high speed chase to Brest will continue for another two days at least, with the MOD70’s enjoying a dream debut spurred by a fast moving front which has really proven ‘to order’.

    After leading during the first 24 hours of the KRYS OCEAN RACE Sidney Gavignet’s Musandam-Oman Sail has been forced to back off on their assault after their port foil failed during Sunday night. Gavignet reported today that they have had to retrieve the foil into the boat and have consequently been sailing slower than their rivals.

    “We were going between 30 and 32 knots in about 25 knots of breeze when we noticed the boat had slowed down and the bow was digging in deeper than usual,” explained Gavignet.

    “We didn’t feel anything and couldn’t see any reason why it did happen. It is not good news - we are now sailing at 70% of our potential – the other boats are going at 30 knots but we are at around 25 which is disappointing but there is nothing we can do until we get the boat to Brest and have a look. Until then, we will just keep going."

    Stève Ravussin’s Race for Water are also compromised after damaging their centreboard during the first night of racing and were lying fifth, around 20 miles behind Musandam-Oman Sail.

    Quotes:
    Sébastien Josse, skipper Groupe Edmond de Rothschild:
    “We have had 30 to 35 knots with quite a few squalls and quite a rough sea with 3 to 3.5 metre swell/waves. Things should ease off a bit towards the end of the day; well, ease off is a relative term, as we should get 20 to 25 knots and maybe 2 to 2.5 metre waves. Either way it will be a lot easier to sail. There are patches where the sea state is very disorganised and then others where it is more regular. We are doing out best, getting past this rougher bit so that we can then sail at our optimum. To ease off we can open the angle a bit and keep in a couple of reefs and sail with our Solent. We have not set a speed limit, but rather work by the feeling of the helm and the sea state, and gusts need to be dealt with by the helm. We must avoid putting the boat under too much stress.”

    Michel Desjoyeaux, skipper FONCIA:
    “ We are going fast and it is very, very wet. At the helm and in the cockpit you get swamped by the waves coming over the boat, so then as soon as you get in below deck it is wet there too as you need to go below to get your foul weather gear off. Wind conditions became stronger over night but have eased off a bit now. On the strategic front, there is not much we can do as we are pretty much all following the same option. We are keeping ahead of this front, which is not bad really because we can maintain the pace and go fast. For the foreseeable future we stay with these conditions as we keep ahead of the front. Then we will see how things develop in two to three days time.”

    40.7 peak speed recorded on Groupe Edmond de Rothschild:

    If the breakneck pace is dropped very slightly on Monday afternoon, the helmsmen have pressed up to incredible speed helped by the magical combination of following, steep seas, 25-30kts of breeze and the Gulf Stream . But as they KRYS OCEAN RACE crews contemplate their third night at sea, average speeds are around 28 knots and the best distance in 24 is now 712 miles!

    From on board Groupe Edmond de Rothschild Antoine Koch writes today:

    "All is well on board Groupe Edmond de Rothschild, except that it is very difficult or virtually impossible to type! Life is more complicated inside the boat than on deck. It's also wet, but we do not see the waves come, when the boat nose dives, which happens about once every hour - it makes beautiful great surfs ... Moving around takes a really long time and are difficult ... Other than that, this transatlantic Express remains true to its word, and the speedometer rarely goes below 30 knots. Florent has improved the boat's speed record: 40.7 knots ... See you soon!"
    Antoine Koch

    711.9nm in 24hr period:

    Since the start of the KRYS OCEAN RACE the MOD70 fleet accelerated to reach extremely high speeds. The distance covered over successive 24 hour periods is quite remarkable. Spindrift racing claims the greatest distance covered with 711.9 miles, followed by FONCIA at 710.7 miles and Groupe Edmond de Rothschild with 708.6 miles.

    An incredible battle is on, who will top these distances? Place your bets!
     
  7. Corley
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    Latest news from the race website:

    http://www.krys-oceanrace.com/en/news.html

    Latest video on MODTV (in French):

    http://bcove.me/oww0x1qp

    The Gift that Keeps on Giving


    For the leaders of the KRYS OCEAN RACE the frontal system that they have ridden since Saturday night continues to prove the gift, which keeps on giving.


    Before leaving New York, initial predictions suggested that the five MOD70’s would benefit for at least three to four days, but as the leaders now contemplate negotiating the north east side of the Azores high pressure system, it now seems likely they will have every chance of curving progressively towards Ireland, the Scillies gate and then to the finish line in Brest with hardly any reduction in speed.

    Sébastien Col, tactician and helm from FONCIA, even suggested today that the most favourable weather files had them reaching the finish with no gybes.

    With the S-SW’ly winds still hitting over 30kts this afternoon, their fourth since leaving Manhattan, the speeds of the three leading MOD70’s continue to be impressive. Spindrift racing have clocked up another day of more than 700 miles on the mid afternoon rankings, holding their average speed just under 30kts.

    So far Spindrift racing’s remarkable 711.9 miles sailed over 24 hours, set Monday, is the highest run yet.

    Yann Guichard and his team, which has lead since Sunday night, still managed to increase their margin on the chasing duo today. With around 1300 miles to sail to the finish, Spindrift racing was holding an advance of 50 miles this afternoon ahead of Seb Josse and crew on Groupe Edmond de Rothschild with FONCIA 13 miles behind them in third.

    Foncia’s Sébastien Col told the live radio call today that their best option should present itself as they pass over the Azores high pressure system. Depending on its evolution as the more southerly boat of the leading trio, FONCIA may find a better, reaching angle sooner whilst their two opponents may find themselves slowed, on a more downwind, open angle.


    But patience has, to some extent, been part of the FONCIA strategy, Col acknowledging on today’s radio vacation with KRYS OCEAN RACE HQ in Brest, that both Spindrift racing and Groupe Edmond de Rothschild have continued with better wind strength and angle.

    Col said: “ We are slightly slower than them and just have to try to sail the boat as fast as we can. With this little disadvantage we try to cross the high pressure not too far behind these two guys, and then try to catch places after.”

    The mood remains stoic, mostly upbeat on fourth placed Musandam-Oman Sail. They have adapted well to their compromised predicament, managing to replace their damaged port foil with the starboard one, a delicate manoeuvre in 25-30kts of wind which required all the strength of three crew plus one helping the lift on a halyard. Though they had tried to sail without a foil, they had found the boat liable to nosediving. But in their new configuration they were making a decent 26 knots average this afternoon, but were some 122 miles behind FONCIA.

    The leading boats are expected Friday, spearing right into the first day of the massive Tonneres de Brest maritime festival.

    The 20th anniversary international gathering of mariners and craft of all shapes and sizes is expected to attract somewhere around 800,000 visitors to Brest’s seven kilometres of waterfront festivities and runs 13th to 19th July.



    Quotes

    Sébastien Col, FONCIA, tactician, trimmer, helm: “Today FONCIA is sailing just above Spindrift and Groupe Edmond de Rothschild, our target is the waypoint to the north of the high pressure which we will reach in approximately 24 hours. We are sailing a little slower than Groupe Edmond de Rothschild and Spindrift because we are a bit more south than them and have a little bit less wind and they have a better angle and so that means we are slightly slower than them so just have to try to sail the boat as fast as we can. With this little disadvantage we try to cross the high pressure not too far behind these two guys, and then will try to catch places after. We are targeting only one gybe to approach the Scilly Islands. One of the best routages we have actually shows that we have no gybes, and so that even suggests it will be very fast for the end of the race.”

    Ryan Breymaier, No 1, Musandam-Oman Sail: “We are going well at the moment - pretty much full speed. When the foil failed, we had to take it out because there was a lot of turbulence and drag and the boat was very slow – about 22 knots – though when it came out completely, the bow dug in a lot so we had to reduce sail. We didn’t feel comfortable trying to change the foil from one side to the other during the night but now we have the foil from the starboard side on the port side, which makes things normal again. The guys are getting tired as it weighs 100kgs and takes three crew plus one on the halyard every time we change it over, but hopefully we will only have to do it twice more during the race.”

    Shifting up

    Because of a small shift to the SW Michel Desjoyeaux and his crew on FONCIA have made two gybes over the course of an hour to move up to Spindrift’s course. At the same time so too Sébastien Josse and his team on Groupe Edmond de Rothschild have also taken the chance to get more north too, following more directly in the leader’s track, anticipating a small veering shift to the SWW when the fleet reach a ridge off the Azores high.
     

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  8. Corley
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  9. Silver Raven
    Joined: Oct 2011
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    Silver Raven Senior Member

    "A" & then again "A" - - O.K. As in # 1 - 'break-through - French - again !!

    Gary - Corley - Doug -- Is it 'cause' - I'm looking for "IT" or is it - "because I know what I'm looking for" - - just to try & show y'all - what-it-is-that-I-see ???

    Look at the c/b of 'Spindrift' - closing-in-on" Brest coast. Come-on - - you's guys have a look at a - - SUPA C/B - I get what they have done - I'll do it next year on the 'little-toy' - THAT'S WHERE WE SHOULD ALL BE HEADING - me thinks - - that's the next - horizon - - break-through. I M H O - Blinken heck - got all of my 6(ex) feet - stuck in me mouth - eh - - he he he. Ciao, james -- Look carefully - guys - cause that's the next real break-through. C - - jj
     
  10. Corley
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    Latest news from the MOD70's. Not long to go now. Good to see Pascal Bidegorry has a new gig with Spindrift Racing.

    Scilly gains?


    Gains by the chasing duo Groupe Edmond de Rothschild and FONCIA which were revealed when the leading MOD70 Spindrift racing reappeared last night from undercover ‘ghost mode’ may continue through the first part of today but Spindrift’s Pascal Bidégorry seemed confident that their crew have enough in hand in an improving forecast to finish first across the Petit Minou finish line this afternoon.


    But the finish of the first KRYS OCEAN RACE will be closer than it was anticipated yesterday.

    Before they disappeared into ghost mode yesterday Spindrift racing had 69.2 miles of a lead over the second placed Groupe Edmond de Rothschild, but this morning that had been cut to just 35.9 miles.

    As all three MOD70 teams passed the longitude of Fastnet Rock, off the southern tip of Ireland in the small hours of the this morning - sailing roughly the same track - Yann Guichard and the Spindrift Racing crew had a lead of 1 hour and 25 min ahead of Seb Josse’s Groupe Edmond de Rothschild with Michel Desjoyeaux in third with his FONCIA crew at only 30 minutes behind them.

    Bidégorry, racing in the lightest wind since leaving New York Sunday, 12kts, said

    “ Once we round the Scilly Isles, we should pick up the southwest breeze that will come in stronger and be more stable for the approach to Ushant. Now we are just ahead of the low and had to get over a small ridge, which means the others have managed to catch up on us. For now we should be pretty much on a direct route from now on though.”

    The leaders were around 50 miles from the Scilly Isles gate at 0630hrs UTC, after which they have around 120 miles to sail to the finish line.

    This morning Spindrift Racing had temporarily outrun the leading edge of the front which has propelled them at high speeds all the way across the Atlantic, and so were in much lighter breezes when Bidégorry spoke to the early morning radio call with KRYS OCEAN RACE. But after squeezing through a small light airs ridge, they should be caught again by the stronger winds for a high speed finale, close reaching to the finish.

    After finishing the MOD70’s will remain offshore before making a grand entrance into the Tonnerres de Brest festival tomorrow afternoon.

    Pascal Bidégorry, Spindrift racing:

    “The wind has dropped down to 12 knots over night. Once we round the Scilly Isles, we should pick up the southwest breeze that will come in stronger and be more stable for the approach to Ushant. Now we are just ahead of the low andhad to get over a small ridge, which means the others have managed to catch up on us. For now we should be pretty much on a direct route from now on though.


    I look at the weather too with Yann as well as being at the helm, this is still a boat and we have to sail it! Sometimes you are at the helm on a one and a half hour watch and the last fifteen minutes can be really tough. It is not easy keeping your eyes open with the bucket loads of water constantly spaying in your face. My eyes are knackered!


    There are not that many boats this size that can cross the Atlantic in so few days.

    It is really nice to get the feeling of the old 60 footers, I think we had all forgotten just how wet it is on board and that we live en up living like dogs on board, there are not comforts. Now we are a bit drier, we all had to get changed after two days because it started to smell. It was like a mouldy smell, not just from the foul weather kit but also from the boat itself. Not very nice!


    We should get to the finish this afternoon, hard to put a time on it because it is not until we get passed the Scilly Isles that we will know for sure, but anytime from 2pm onwards to say four in the afternoon. There should be a wind rotation and then there are a few rocks to deal with too…


    It is dawn and not all that much to eat on board…we have really rummaged around and can’t find anything. But then we just get on with the sailing and grab whatever is going.”
     

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  11. Gary Baigent
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    Gary Baigent Senior Member

    You mean this twisted foil that they're swapping across? Well good luck building it ... and fitting it into your case. By the way, it's a foil not a centreboard. Cheers.
     

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  12. Doug Lord
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    Doug Lord Flight Ready

    Mod 70

    From Scuttlebutt last night:

    MOD-ERNIZING OCEAN RACING
    By Ryan O'Grady, Sailing World

    "The fastest boats." Check. "The world's best sailors." Check again.
    Newport, R.I., had it all last week, but I'm not talking about the
    America's Cup World Series. Overshadowed by the wings rising over Fort
    Adams were the world's real fastest sailors. Hiding in plain sight at
    Newport Shipyard were the sailors of the MOD 70 circuit.

    Russell Coutts may think his AC45 is fast, but Spindrift co-skipper Pascal
    Bidegorry sailed over 900 miles in one day on Banque Populaire V. He's not
    the only one; most of the Transatlantic record-breaking crew is spread
    throughout the five-boat fleet. Current Jules Verne Trophy holder Brian
    Thompson is on Mussandam-Oman Sail. His 45-day lap of the planet is still
    awe-inspiring. Double Vendée Globe winner Michel Desjoyeaux, skipper of
    Foncia, is also present.

    There's no marketing hype needed here, though maybe there should be. Even
    as an estimated 60,000 sailing fans packed Fort Adams, less than 1% of them
    knew that the reigning royalty of ocean racing was at their doorstep, and
    that a tour of some of the fastest boats to ever cross an ocean was free
    for the asking.

    The first Multi One Design 70 trimaran hit the water last year. Designed to
    replace the old ORMA 60 trimarans with a faster, more cost effective
    platform, the MOD 70 class was supposed to be the multihull's answer to the
    Volvo Ocean Race; fully crewed ocean racers on a global circuit. The
    comparisons end there, though. A Volvo 70 is a brute of a boat. Just
    sitting at the dock, the boat seems to say "I eat sailors for lunch."
    Everything on a Volvo 70 is big and powerful.

    The MOD 70, though, is an exercise in refinement. Everything on the boat is sleek and sexy, from the ultra narrow hulls to the slick canting wing mast.
    Since there's no lead to drag around in a MOD 70, it can generate a greater
    power-to-weight ratio than a VO 70. In fact, the entire 6.9 ton
    displacement of a MOD 70 is less than the 8.2 ton weight of a Volvo 70 keel
    assembly. Things then become more manageable. The gennaker on a MOD 70 can be dragged around by a single (strong) person. Moving the Code Zero on a Volvo 70 requires you and a bunch of your friends.

    On paper, this class has it all. Yet, halfway through the inaugural Krys
    Ocean Race from New York to Brest, France, who's watching? According to
    YouTube, just 500 people. Anyone who loves ocean racing should be glued to
    their Internet connections. In the first 24 hours of the race, the fleet
    averaged 640 miles in 24 hours, with some boats breaking the 700-mile mark.
    Let's put that into perspective. On the first full day of the first
    official MOD 70 race, every boat sailed faster than any monohull in
    history! So why isn't there a greater following? --
    Read on:
    http://www.sailingworld.com/blogs/racing/mod-ernizing-ocean-racing

    =====================================
    Could the lack of interest be due to the fact that these are one design boats? In the ORMA 60's there was always the risk of "crash and burn" with the various teams and their "go-fast" secrets. With that gone does it affect interest more than the business managers supposed it would? I know it affects my interest......
     
  13. Corley
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    Three out of the five MOD70's have now finished with Musandam/Oman sail set to finish soon, Race for Water still has about 400nm to go. Spindrift Racing maintained their lead to come in first Spindrift wos the Krys Ocean Race for Mod 70's in four days 21 hours 08 minutes 37s, for an average of 25.03 kts on this 2950 miles race course, followed by Edmond De Rothschild and Foncia. Spindrifts initial decision to take a more northerly track paid off.
     

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  14. Corley
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  15. Silver Raven
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    Silver Raven Senior Member

    Gooday cobber & Thanks a bundle ! ! WOW They SURE are the 'real goods' 25 plus kts average for 2900 plus miles - golly-gosh.

    Sorry that Doug has lost interest - maybe Gary, you & I should make him a 18' model - to go 'get-wet-on' - Me thinks it would shrink - big-time - that lovely pond - where they just took some pics.

    I'm waiting for you people to tell me much more about the c/b on 'Spindrift' - cause - as I see it - it's a 3 piece c/w the center bit - raise & lower section.

    Corley - there's you c/b for sure - if you want to 'kick-***' when you launch your own 'rocket-ship.

    Come-on fellas - I need some feed back here - - Please - tnx, james
     
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