Multihull Collision Survivability

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by Skint For Life, May 12, 2011.

  1. boradicus
    Joined: May 2013
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    Location: USA

    boradicus Senior Member

    That would be perfect!!! I like the double action foot/hand pump too. Less going wrong is a good thing when things have already gone wrong :^).
     
  2. buzzman
    Joined: May 2011
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    Location: Australia

    buzzman Senior Member

    Please forward; Tweet, Facebook, email...

    OK, so I figure we need to do something to get this off the ground. A switched on friend suggested the idea of "crowdfunding" to get seed funding to initiate prototype development.

    Analysis indicates the Quirky site is the most appropriate to engineering type ideas.....so I created a Profile and Uploaded the idea, using one of the pics from Ian Farrier's site as the graphic.

    If the idea ever gets beyond the drawing board he will be acknowledged and rewarded, as is only right and proper.

    Frankly, I'd be happy if he took over the project if it gets that far.....I just want one for *my* boat.... lol

    So in the interests of assisting multihull sailors everywhere, can you all please Tweet, Facebook, email this link and ask all your contacts to 'Vote' for it, so it gets some interest on the site.

    That, apparently is the first step in generating funding....

    http://www.quirky.com/ideations/527033
     
  3. buzzman
    Joined: May 2011
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    Location: Australia

    buzzman Senior Member

    OK, so that was a waste of time - got zero response on the Quirky site. Guess if it's not geek or sexy crowdfunding won't work....

    BUt I postd the request on a few othe sites and one of them sparked a debate here:
    http://crew.org.nz/forum/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=22249

    It got off to a shaky start, but after it settled down and the naysayers pushed off, quite a few good ideas popped up.

    I'm now thinking, as a a result of the to-ing and fro-ing on crew.org thread that the idea of permanently mounting the airline in the mast and having the cylinder at deck level is not the best way forward.

    I'm now thinking that an integrated airbag unit hauled to the masthead on the fore edge of the mast is the best bet.

    Mainly because it could be lowered for re-arming; inspection; repair etc, which would make it a whole lot easier to use - and probably be more reliable than one permanently mounted on the mast.

    Have a look at the thread and post any comments here...
     
  4. redreuben
    Joined: Jan 2009
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    Location: Beaconsfield Western Australia

    redreuben redreuben

    Just thinking aloud after watching the Firebird video, with dyneema rigging wouldn't an emergency shroud release be pretty effective at capsize prevention ?
     
  5. buzzman
    Joined: May 2011
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    Location: Australia

    buzzman Senior Member

    Define emergency rig release..?? With pic, pref..

    Or do mean "knife"..??? lol
     
  6. hump101
    Joined: Oct 2004
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    Location: Brittany, France

    hump101 Senior Member

    I've looked at using an air-bag up the mast, but am now looking at using a double skinned, close cell foam filled, aerofoil section top of the mainsail. This has some disadvantages: weight, windage, increased heel at equilibrium, etc., but has some advantages as well, like it is passive, in place all the time (though lower when reefed), and allows me to split the sail around the shroud, so I can dump the top section even when downwind.

    I'm combining this with suitably placed buoyancy on wings and tramp, plus a dump system on the sheet, track, and shroud, all controlled from an accelerometer. In theory it will make the cat much less likely to capsize, and then rightable once it is over, but it will be a big ask in any reasonable sea state without a tender to control the orientation of the boat when capsized.
     
  7. boradicus
    Joined: May 2013
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    boradicus Senior Member

    Here's a wild idea. Create a vertically symmetrical set of hulls with gyro-stabilized cabin space that can roll upside down. Have a spare mast, and a set of hull releases for your topside mast and rigging so after the weather calms you can recover the top mast but still have your spare with your spare set of sails just in case. All you have to do then is release the stays and the mast, and despite some minor turbulence on the hull where the lines and the mast attach (which you could fix with plastic caps made to fit when you get to port, you have an upside down boat ready to sail. Just shut all your cabinets up when the weather gets bad and strap yourself in so you don't get knocked about too badly. Basically the same concept as a mono, but you are a multi =). But this is more for capsizing than for collision, unless you can somehow intentionally turn over the hull... which might be possible if one side is sinking or riding low due to collision damage. It would be weird..
     
  8. hump101
    Joined: Oct 2004
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    Location: Brittany, France

    hump101 Senior Member

    This idea was proposed in an AYRS publication back in the 70's or so, except the single mast could be swung around the main beam 180 degrees via the bow to take up it's new position. Not sure it was ever built, though.
     

  9. buzzman
    Joined: May 2011
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    Location: Australia

    buzzman Senior Member

    Would the shrouds have to be Dyneem, por could a traditional stainless steel quick release Hyfield type lever do the job with stainless rigging?

    Or does the amount of slack needed for the boat to right mean that these levers do not provide enough...??
     
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