Motor Sailers?

Discussion in 'Motorsailers' started by Viceroy, Apr 2, 2002.

  1. brian eiland
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    brian eiland Senior Member

    I can see where it would aid in damping roll, but not that much in extra driving power
     
  2. Guillermo
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    Guillermo Ingeniero Naval

    Yeap. Not that much, but pretty good for my really undercanvassed boat.
     
  3. MikeJohns
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    MikeJohns Senior Member

    Guillermo, Brian

    Here's a picture of the vessel romping along in the trades, I can see the extra knot here. The topsails an old gaffer flies are not so dissimilar , just getting as much up as possible in good clean air.

    This mule is a bit bigger in proportion to Marie's and cut for the job :)
     

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  4. Pericles
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    Pericles Senior Member

  5. brian eiland
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    brian eiland Senior Member

    Dear Pericles,
    Is that a computer rendering, or an actual photo? The sails just look too perfectly set?
     

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  6. Pericles
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    Pericles Senior Member

    Brian,

    The vessel exists only on a hard drive, but, what a vessel!

    BTW, what's the name for the triangular sails set above the staysails?

    Regards,

    Pericles
     
  7. Guillermo
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    Guillermo Ingeniero Naval

    Perry,
    I think those are called 'trysails' in english (not storm trysails, but mast trysails), but I'm not sure.
    Were quite common in schooners and even in steamers.
    Cheers.
     
  8. Pericles
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    Pericles Senior Member

    Guillermo,

    Trysails! Of course! I think I may have known that, but the old brain box is sometimes faulty on recall. I was going to call them "Leg of Mutton" sails, because of their shape.

    Thanks for that.

    Pericles
     
  9. RHP
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    RHP Senior Member

    A trysail was certainly the storm'sl abaft the mast working in combination with the storms'l on the forestay on a sloop, I cant say whether the same name applied to the full size working sail pictured. Really she's a wishbone schooner without the wishbone by the look of it thanks to modern materials and technology.
     
  10. brian eiland
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    brian eiland Senior Member

    MacLear boomless cutter

    MacLear & Harris designed a boomless cutter build by Palmer Johnson I believe. It was a vessel in the range of 80-90 feet

    Does anyone have, or know where I might find a photo or two of her??

    Frank Maclear was a big fan, and a pioneer of boomless sailing rigs
     
  11. MikeJohns
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    MikeJohns Senior Member

    Brian

    She was called Falcon II.

    LOA 62' LWL 50' 5" Beam 16' 3" Draft 8' Displ 92,000 lb SA 1823 sq ft Built in Aluminium by Palmer Johnson for B Heineman of Chicago.

    All sails are roller furling, the Canadian designer Simpson had a similar design both seem to have performed very well .

    Cheers
     

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  12. brian eiland
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    brian eiland Senior Member

    Angantyr

    Thanks Mike, I wasn't aware of that one.

    I remember a big strong looking cutter called "Angantyr" that was built for a gentlman here on the Chesapeake Bay. But it had a boom. It also had twin tandem centerboards.

    I believe there was a larger version of this design built as a boomless vessel, wherein the mainsail was sheeted to the three backstays??
     

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  13. MikeJohns
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    MikeJohns Senior Member

    I know Angantyr very well and viewed her recently with a view to purchase, she was on the hard in an industrial area in Houston and she'd been half gutted, the rudder had been extended most horribly and the teak decks had been glassed over.

    The nav station was perched in an annex half way up the companionway and she was a bit dark down below, so I wisely but reluctantly passed her by.

    I'm aware of a smaller version but not a larger one.
     
  14. brian eiland
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    brian eiland Senior Member


  15. RHP
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    RHP Senior Member

    What a beautiful yacht, thanks for posting. I have previously tried to find a website dedicated to MacLear and Harris but couldnt find anything. Is there a site i've missed or a book of designs at all?

    Mike, where did you find Angantyr, any web reference?

    Cheers
    Richard
     
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