more rudder questions

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by rayman, Oct 16, 2011.

  1. rayman
    Joined: Sep 2009
    Posts: 130
    Likes: 6, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 59
    Location: brisbane

    rayman Senior Member

    I have recently bought a small (19'4") cruiser/racer and will set it up to cruise the Queensland coast. It has a reverse angled stern and an outboard mounted rudder which I want to change. What is/was the advantage of the foreward raked rudder? and transom? I want to make a verticle mount with a little balance and a kick-up blade because I just know I am going to bottom out somewhere sometime and don't want to tear the rudder off.:confused:
     

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  2. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    The keel is deeper than the rudder. If you need a kick-up one, the boat will be pounding on the bottom.
     
  3. Doug Lord
    Joined: May 2009
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    Location: Melbourne, Florida

    Doug Lord Flight Ready

    You could add a kick-up rudder with a little balance fairly simply but making the rudder vertical will triple the amount of work for very little gain. I don't see that angle as worth the hassle of straightening it. While it's always possible the rudder will hit- that keel seems like some fairly good protection.
    Have any others in your class made the changes you want to make?
     

  4. CutOnce

    CutOnce Previous Member

    Unless you build an extension to the transom which allow vertical mounting of the pintles and gudgeons, you will have a rudder that has most of it's area forward of the hinge axis. This would be unstable and will try to move off centerline constantly. By doing this you will also be killing resale value on your boat by moving the design away from the designer's intent.

    Gonzo is right - you will be grinding your keel down before your rudder touches, so why bother? If you are looking for a shallow draft beachable reef-friendly boat, the fixed keel is going to be a problem.

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    CutOnce
     
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