Monohull verses Multihull powersailers / motorsailers

Discussion in 'Motorsailers' started by brian eiland, Aug 8, 2004.

  1. sabahcat
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    sabahcat Senior Member

  2. TeddyDiver
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    TeddyDiver Gollywobbler

    Trawlers aren't motorsailers, anyway not with the standards I've used to.
    Schionning on the other hand has a quite nice range of sailing cats, from what's more a racer like to proper ocean cruisers and motorsailers and almost everything btw.
     
  3. sabahcat
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    sabahcat Senior Member

    Click on sail for endeavourcat, they are motorsailers

    First pic endevour motorsaler
    2nd pic Pescott whitehaven cruising cat

    I wouldnt consider any schionning to be a motor sailer, they can happily sail at windspeed up to about 15 knots+
     

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  4. Manie B
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    Manie B Senior Member

    This thread has had some very interesting points
    and i am rather glad that i read it
    i firmly believe that a proper sailing cat still makes for a very efficient motor cat even without mast or sails
    same motion and very light on fuel at 10 knots

    here are the underbridge shapes from HELL

    i didn't know whether i should laugh or cry - so i did both

    farkit i cant believe it :mad:

    go to schionning - that is proper design :D
     

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  5. Fanie
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    Fanie Fanie

    If you're 20 you need one 20 year old.

    If you're 40 you need 2 twenty year olds

    if you're 60 you should go for 3 twenty year olds.

    It's not for what you think.
    It's so they can do stuff you're too old to do :D
     
  6. TeddyDiver
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    TeddyDiver Gollywobbler

    Couldn't agree more :D
    A motorsailer can do it's hull speed with sails or motoring.
    A trawler, cat or mono, with some rags hanging on top doesn't make it a motorsailer.
     
  7. brian eiland
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    brian eiland Senior Member

    Powersailer with Aft-Mast Rig

    Seems as though this subject thread has gone dormant...too bad as there was a lot of interesting material here.

    Per one of the words in the title of this thread 'Powersailers' I thought I would bring up this 40 powersailer from Thailand.
    http://tinyurl.com/catamaran-power-sailing-HK40

    It utilizes that aft-mast arrangement I've touted for a long time. Seems the Hong Kong owner is quite happy with it. There are several more being built. In fact I've been told the second one is being launched today, and that I will receive some new photos soon.

    Here's the first one
     

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  8. sabahcat
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    sabahcat Senior Member

    One has to ask how much diesel-miles you can buy for the cost of the mast, sails, furlers, chainplates etc.
     
  9. brian eiland
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    brian eiland Senior Member

    But one also has to ask about the unlimited range that the sailing option offers. Are there that many 'strickly powerboats' you are willing to, or capabile of crossing oceans with??
     
  10. sabahcat
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    sabahcat Senior Member

    Do you really think that particular vessel is one?
    I think it more designed to cruise around the land of cheap diesel and not much wind.
    That being the case, my comment stands.;)
     
  11. DennisRB
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    DennisRB Senior Member

    What a great post. Yeah I know its 5 years old but you nailed the concept and reality of motor sailing.

     
  12. brian eiland
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    brian eiland Senior Member

    Time spent "on the wind"

    Another interesting observation from the log books of an ocean cruising sailor:

    "Mike, a number of years ago I went through the log book of my trip through the S. Pacific to New Zealand and back. In 174 days at sea over 5 years the ketch Saga spent about 10 days actually on the wind. While there were certainly times when it would be good to go up wind better, taking a boat to sea that is hard to sail just to optimize those 10 days would be stupid.

    During the same cruise I spent about 34 days with the chute up, where I didn't use the mizzen because it didn't do anything but slow me down. I was sailing about 160 to 170 degrees apparent wind.

    The conclusion I have to come to for a cruising boat is that one should optimize reaching so long as the boat isn't un-safe. Lee shores are still dangerous."

    Beau

    This came as a response to this quote:
    BTW, this posting came from a really good subject thread entitled
    http://www.boatdesign.net/forums/boat-design/why-yawl-ketch-instead-sloop-27141.html
     
  13. DennisRB
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    DennisRB Senior Member

    This is only true for a retired cruiser who waits all year. Cruisers who only have holidays when they can get them need to sail upwind. I just sailed from Adelaide to Newcastle via Bass Strait and we were on the wind more than half the time. Of course if I had unlimited time I would have waited for more favorable winds.
     
  14. brian eiland
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    brian eiland Senior Member

    I'm not sure of his wait time in this case, but he has spent a lot of time at sea:

    As to ('this retired cruiser's') experience sailing:
    - 47 years at sea
    - 15 years driving schooners professionally
    - 105 days at sea last year, 32 so far this year, thousands of days under sail over the last four decades on every sort of sailing craft
    - longest trip in the last few years a 5 year trip around the Pacific
    - sailed everything from a banks dory to a 158' schooner
    - built everything from a pram to a 50' yawl
    - built in wood, steel, fiberglass, the only thing I passed on was cement
    - raced extensively


    I can appreciate that you had a cruise that developed into a lot of windward work, but a great majority of the accounts I read don't seem to support lots of windward work.
     

  15. DennisRB
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    DennisRB Senior Member

    That is an impressive history and BeauVrolyk certainly is a very experienced seaman who deserves respect. However the time spent to windward was not as a portion of that entire history. It was of a portion of a 174 days at sea over 5 years on the ketch Saga. 5 years being long enough to pick favorable winds when going through the S. Pacific to New Zealand and back. Cruisers who might get a month or 2 off will probably want to end up in the same place they started (home port), and they will be very lucky indeed if the wind always blows the way they are going over such a small rigid time frame. I cant wait until I have unlimited time so I almost never have to sail upwind. But until then its mostly up to the weather.

    Also, have you considered that many cruisers who might say they never sail upwind do so because their yachts are simply so terrible at it that they pretty much don't even have that option? The Roberts Spray that my sailing buddy owned made its way to Australia from South Africa, Asia and the Pacific Islands. Now I can guarantee they didn't do any windward work as this poorly performing yacht simply could not do it. We promptly got rid of the yacht as it was entirely useless for any trip we tried to do on it due to not having the time to wait for perfect winds. When you get 2 weeks off you cant wait for the winds to change. The boat we used on the Adelaide to Newcastle trip could sail to windward OK and because of that we made it as far as we did. The Spray would still be in Adelaide for 8 months until the trades change.
     
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