Monohull Sailboats Built For Ocean Passages

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by Pehola, Jan 28, 2015.

  1. Pehola
    Joined: Jan 2015
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    Location: Chicago area

    Pehola New Member

    I know there's no shortage of opinion about what boat can make an ocean passage. I hope this thread doesn't turn into that debate. I'm looking for opinions more from an engineer's or NA's perspective. Real facts would be great.

    I've been in some rough weather and have always found it more enjoyable when I wasn't worried about the boat making it through. When I first started sailing 40 years ago, the jarring that rattles through lesser-built boats didn't bother me so much. Now it's been there, done that and I want to move into a boat I have more confidence in.

    We'll be headed off cruising soon and could see trans-ocean crossings in our future. We're shopping for that boat now and hoped to get some feedback as to which builders to aim for in that search.

    So far, we've seen an Alden 48, Hylas 44 & 49, Taswell 49, Bowman 48, Tayana 48 and Oyster 485. My SO has been looking at Contest, Najad, Hallberg-Rassy and even a Kaufman 49 as boats of interest. Thank John Kretschmer for the last one. These are all used boats under $400K asking.

    After the seeing the Oyster, I got stuck. Structurally, it impressed me like no other I've seen yet. And below, I just loved it. My SO wants to keep looking though.

    What feedback can you provide that will help narrow our focus? Things like inherent problems, sailability in certain conditions, structural issues that have arisen over time - things like that.

    Thanks!
    Julie
     
  2. JosephT
    Joined: Jun 2009
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    Location: Roaring Forties

    JosephT Senior Member

    Hi Julie, some the hulls you describe are on the web site below. This site is not the end all list of boats, but it's a good reference point to examine features of bluewater hulls.

    http://bluewaterboats.org/about/index/

    Each boat will be have a bit differently in light airs, following seas, etc. so it's good to read up on the performance of each. For offshore passages there's a pretty good list of items to consider. The route you take also makes a big difference, as does the types of harbors you enter (shallow draft or deep?). Also, if you plan to venture into the Southern Ocean, Northern Pacific or North Atlantic you had better consider a very solid boat with a good motion comfort & capsize ratio.

    The Oyster 485 looks like a solid boat and has a good design review. That's the kind of stuff you're looking for.

    http://features.boats.com/boat-content/2000/08/perry-design-review-oyster-485/

    Once you've narrowed down your list, the next step is to compare individual performance parameters. The sail calculator is a nifty tool for that. Just select any two model boats and compare their specs. For long passages the motion comfort is something that's quite important.

    http://tomdove.com/sailcalc/sailcalc.html

    Once you compare a bit further if you have any specific questions just post them here and I'm sure you'll get some good input.

    Fair winds,

    Joseph
     
  3. Pehola
    Joined: Jan 2015
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    Location: Chicago area

    Pehola New Member

    Thank you, Joseph. :)

    Our plans are to start in the Bahamas, so we have to consider draft. From there we may go farther south into the Caribbean. We've also been talking about heading over to the Med at some point in the next few years. But neither of us is interested in seeking out cold weather so we plan to stay out of the higher latitudes.

    From what I've read, Oyster manages pretty well in producing a comfortable boat with decent speed. My dad had a Columbia 45 and while that was comfortable, it needed a good wind to get it moving. I'd rather sail to the next destination.
     
  4. JosephT
    Joined: Jun 2009
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    Location: Roaring Forties

    JosephT Senior Member

    You're welcome. Most boats in the UK built well. As with any prospect boat before you plunk down the cash be sure to get a survey done from an independent, reputable surveyor.

    http://namsglobal.org/find-a-marine-surveyor/
     
  5. Sybarite
    Joined: Feb 2015
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    Location: France

    Sybarite Sybarite

    Hi Julie,

    Have a look at the French Amel range, especially the Amel Super Maramu (53'). Simple solutions, no physical effort required, Rolls Royce quality construction.
     

  6. JSL
    Joined: Nov 2012
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    Location: Delta BC

    JSL Senior Member

    I have designed sailboats between 33' and 70' that have gone offshore, crossed the Pacific (Vancouver to Australia) and around the world (40' & 44' steel). A lot depends on the number of people aboard, their skills, and each needs some 'personal space'.
     
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