Modified Prism (Hanuu's Boatyard)

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by minno, Feb 8, 2015.

  1. minno
    Joined: Aug 2014
    Posts: 88
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    Location: Canada

    minno Junior Member

    Hi All

    I'm considering building a 2 sheet Prism from the plans on Hanuu's Boatyard and am looking for a bit of advice.

    it's a one sheet dory with 16" sides and bottom and about 10' long

    this'll be a row/sailboat by itself, and the center of a stabilized monohull eventually.

    it needs to be as light as possible, hand wheelable by one guy, I figure 100 pounds max, I'd prefer 80, but then I'm a dreamer :)

    I'm using 1/4" ext fir plywood and spruce chine logs (these are already in my shop so non negotiable :) )

    I WILL NOT be using any fiberglass beyond tape to finish the outside of the chines and maybe to make the frames holding the mast a bit more secure.

    What I'd like to do is either widen the bottom panel to 24" and put a 32" extension in the middle, or leave the bottom panel at 16" and put an 8' extension in the middle.
    I'm not sure if having two joins in the middle would be sturdy enough, even with frames over them.

    I'd like to put in a daggerboard but I'm not sure where it should go, would two be better?

    Rockered or not? just interested in what makes the best sailboat, I don't care how quickly it turns, I'm retired and have all the time in the world and the whole pacific to turn in so I can use 40 acres if I need to :)

    I'm planning on a cat rig, seems the easiest rig to handle, until I get the pontoons done I'll use a short mast and a tiny sail just to learn on.

    I'll probably have lots more questions, once I figure out what I should be asking :)

    Take Care

    minno
     
  2. tdem
    Joined: Oct 2013
    Posts: 130
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    Location: NZ

    tdem Senior Member

    A dory, which this almost is, isn't a very good sailboat. You want something with good initial stability. Why use this design as the starting point?

    With your description of requirements, the Woods design Duo springs to mind:

    http://www.sailingcatamarans.com/in...ats-and-dinghies-/420-duo-10ft-sailrow-dinghy

    Two sheets of plywood, light weight and simple. Add a couple of outriggers and it turns into the Tryst 10 trimaran:

    http://www.sailingcatamarans.com/index.php/designs/27-trimarans-under-25/428-tryst-trimaran
     
  3. minno
    Joined: Aug 2014
    Posts: 88
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    Location: Canada

    minno Junior Member

    you're right, the duo would be a much better boat for me, and I suppose having a full set of plans might save me at least $50 worth of frustration.

    I like the prysm because it's so simple to build, a definite plus for a first boat.

    the original plan was to build one prism to get a boat in the water, and then build a second one and a deck to join them into a cat, seemed too short to sail so...

    guess it needs some more thought, I really like the Duo, it looks fun and functional. Thanks for the link :)

    Take Care

    minno
     
  4. minno
    Joined: Aug 2014
    Posts: 88
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    Location: Canada

    minno Junior Member

    Hi :)

    I bought the duo plans and this is what I've done so far, thanks again Tdem for the link to the Duo, it's almost perfect for me :)

    Minno
     

    Attached Files:

  5. tdem
    Joined: Oct 2013
    Posts: 130
    Likes: 5, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 41
    Location: NZ

    tdem Senior Member

    Looks really good! Have you launched yet?
     

  6. minno
    Joined: Aug 2014
    Posts: 88
    Likes: 0, Points: 6, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Canada

    minno Junior Member

    Thanks :)

    I've put about 50 miles on her, about 8 on the cart and the rest on the water, took a while to learn to keep a straight track but she cruises along pretty good.

    Put a crab trap out a couple days ago, I can pull it in over the transom with about an inch or so of transom still showing above the water.

    I've got the outriggers built, they're a bit rough, but were great practice for all the skills I've never used before, should have them on in a week or so and then I can start on the sail rig.

    minno
     
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