Modern Hi Tech Viking Ship Development Class

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Johan Strydom, Jan 23, 2021.

  1. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Also the sides of the boat.
     
  2. Johan Strydom
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    Johan Strydom Junior Member

    Thank you for the links, beautiful boats. My thinking is still vague. It looks like I have to think of this size boat.

    http://www.balta.fr/tangara/p3.jpg

    https://api.europeana.eu/thumbnail/...ediaLib/588/media-588070/large.jpg&type=IMAGE
     
  3. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    The first has no provision for oars. The second is a typical coastal boat. Neither fulfills your SOR.
     
  4. Rumars
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    Rumars Senior Member

    In simple words, the boat weight (and resistance) increases faster than you can add horsepower. It's a problem that can be solved by lighter and stronger materials only up to a point, afterwards the hp/kg ratio diminishes and the boat gets progressively slower. That's why olympic rowing boats look that way, it's the minimal amount of boat necessary to float the rowers in calm conditions. You can build a viking design in carbon foam and it will weigh less and be potentially faster then the wood original, but that's all. And this still does not adress all the other factors like behavior a sea, etc.
     
  5. clmanges
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    clmanges Senior Member

    I can't think of a way to make this work. The oarlock has to be attached immovably (fore/aft) to the hull in order to serve as a fulcrum to transmit the oar's motive force to the boat.
     
  6. bajansailor
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    bajansailor Marine Surveyor

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  7. Johan Strydom
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    Johan Strydom Junior Member

    Thank you very much for this. It is wonderful to see that my thinking can be a reality, I wonder when they thought of that. Dudley Dix said it was done long ago. I took it one step further. Maybe I should share that with them.
     
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  8. sharpii2
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    sharpii2 Senior Member

    Viking ships had sails and keels for a reason. The keel allowed at least rudimentary upwind sailing. And, of course, the sail was large enough to propel the ship.

    I don't think they were really galleys, but sailing ships with oars. The oars were likely for getting on and off the beach, and for getting up creeks and rivers when there was little or no wind.

    Suppose you stipulate five requirements for these boats

    1.) they can not have an engine or an electric motor for propulsion.
    2.) they must embark from a beach, then land on a beach.
    3.) they must be monohulls.
    4.) they must be able to cross at least 3,000 kilometers of open sea.
    5.) the crew must be able to set up and take down the mast(s) with no outside help, even while on quiet water.

    If I were to speculate what these boats might look like, I would expect to see something with a flat bottom and a well rounded bilge, with maybe a deep fore foot, a deep detachable rudder, a Beam of around 8 ft, and a length of maybe 60 ft. There would probably be a crew of 20 or less.

    It would have at least two masts, maybe three, and would probably carry lug or sprit-peak sails.

    This being a race, there will be an automatic incentive to make the boat as long as practical. Longer length means less power to get the same speed. Very useful for very limited power, mechanical (oars), and limited sail.
     
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  9. Johan Strydom
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    Johan Strydom Junior Member

    It had been done.
     
  10. Johan Strydom
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    Johan Strydom Junior Member

    Thank you for making it very clear. The design of the hull would be totally open for optimizing. The above water part can shaped to minimize wind resistance. The power available can be more effectively used. The options may be to accept additional power sources, wind or even power, or limit the distance. Average time for a marathon is 4 h. The distance can be based on that. What is the maximum size boat that human power can still be significant. It is clear that a racing 8 size boat will be hard to beat, if speed is the only requirement, though a cat might be better option at sea.
     
  11. Tiny Turnip
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    Tiny Turnip Senior Member

  12. Tiny Turnip
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    Tiny Turnip Senior Member

    The Boat https://www.rannochadventure.com/roxy/the-boat



    [​IMG]

    edited to add video and spec.
     
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  13. Johan Strydom
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    Johan Strydom Junior Member

    Yes Viking longships was primarily designed for sailing. Adding a keel will ad resistance, when relying on human power. I will use dagger boards, that can also be used when needed to prevent leeway. A motor might be needed for safety. Beaching is an interesting angle I have not considered before. The keel serves then as a skid, and to protect the hull. Well worth considering. 3. Why do you insist on monohulls? With the Polynesian double canoe, the stability problem is solved. For human propulsion the hull shape should be as rounded as possible to reduce surface area. For sailing you need more hull stability. I am thinking of using removable, inflatable outrigger(s).
    Thank you. I enjoyed that. Good video. Looks like they are really moving. I do not think it will last long at see. Thank for sharing.
     
  14. Johan Strydom
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    Johan Strydom Junior Member

    WOW. Thank you Tiny Turnip. 8 berths ! This will keep me busy for a while. All these boats seem to have similar LOA. Racing 8, Dragon boat, whale boat, Bantry Bay Gigs, Femboring. 36'- 39' So I should think of 40' LOA max.? beam 6'
     

  15. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Carbon Based Life Form

    With bilge keels you reduce draft and it can sit levelish on the strand at low tide.
     
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